Dragonskull Summit

Dragonskull Summit

Land

This enters the battlefield tapped unless you control a Swamp or a Mountain.

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Dragonskull Summit Discussion

RNR_Gaming on New secret lair Alert!

1 month ago

Anyways with that whole kickstarter thing going on I noticed that the professor hasn't made a video so in case anyone was wondering

Some regular guys non-foil/foil

Void Winnower - 16.07/20.46

Vengevine - 10.71/12.95

Collector Ouphe - 5.63/33.07

Goblin Settler - 48.71/N/a

Non foil: 81.12 Foil: 115.19

Foil: B / non-foil: C+

There's a good bit of value with this secret lair. Goblin settlers getting its' first foil printing is definitely noteworthy. Also, if you're into the Adventure Time art style you'll like be picking this up anyways.

Showcase: Streets of New Capenna

Atraxa, Praetors' Voice - 30.77/35.53

Breya, Etherium Shaper - 7.98/9.84

Yidris, Maelstrom Wielder - N/A/8.84

Non-foil: 47.59 foil: 54.21

Non-foil - D foil: C-

This grade pains me because I REALLY think the art on these is beautiful and they'll likely include a Kynaios and Tiro of Meletis in the same style as a bonus card but putting personal preferance and speculation aside the value just is not here.

Special Guest: Matt Jukes Foil Edition

Glacial Fortress - 3.71/11.25

Drowned Catacomb - 7.28/17.46

Dragonskull Summit - 3.79/6.96

Rootbound Crag - 3.81/6.55

Sunpetal Grove - 3.89/5.96

Non-foil: 22.48 foil: 48.18

Non-foil - F foil - D-

The value in these really speaks for itself.

Artist Series: Magali Villeneuve

Mother of Runes - 4.91/Varies

Death's Shadow - 6.12/10.19

Elvish Mystic - .45/9.97

Forest - N/A

Non-foil - 11.48 Foil: N/A

Non-foil - F Foil - D-

The biggest thing out of this lair is the foil Mother of Runes the prices fluctuates so much with the older foils it's hard to set an exact price to obtain a foil one; if we look at the previous secret lairs those versions of Mother of Runes are sitting at about 6-10 a piece.

Artist Series: Sidharth Chaturvedi

Concordant Crossroads - 46.87/N/A

Nomad Outpost - 1.06/5.74

Ghost Quarter - 1.12/16.90

Island - N/A

Non-foil: 49.05 foil: 69.51

Non-foil: D- foil: C

Essentially this lair is being carried by the fact that Concordant Crossroads only has 1 printing and has never had a foil printing. If you need one or would like to get a foil one knows your chance but outside of that its just some bulky cards with nice art.

Artist Series: Wayne Reynolds

Sram, Senior Edificer - .25/6.09

Torbran, Thane of Red Fell - .95/1.89

Depala, Pilot Exemplar - .23/1.65

Balthor the Defiled - 10.95/59.61

Non-foil: 12.38 Foil: 69.24

Non-foil - F Foil - C

This lair is also being carried by 1 card that has only 1 printing the rest is bulk.

Finally! Left-Handed Magic Cards

Sisay, Weatherlight Captain - .98/6.02

Empress Galina - 18.31/206.82

Geralf's Messenger - 9.89/34.48

Rograkh, Son of Rohgahh - .26/.41

Garruk, Caller of Beasts - 8.20/23.41

Non-foil: 37.64 foil; 271.14

Non-foil - C Foil: A

While Empress Galina is definitely the chase card out of this; it still has value in the other slots too outside of Roger - but even Roger is still highly playable.

Anyways, after doing all the math and putting this all together I appreciate the professor doing this and compiling it a video format. Also, which secret lairs if any are you planning to get?

Balaam__ on Rakdos Burn

2 months ago

I’d recommend either the Pathway lands  Flip or even Dragonskull Summit over Rakdos Guildgate and Cinder Barrens. They’re both very budget friendly and are faster and more effective than any ETB:tapped land.

wallisface on Black sac deck

3 months ago
  • Just trying to figure out how to do a Red-Black landbase cost-effectively (as the fetches are expensive as all hell, and the shocks aren't exactly budget-friendly either). I think the following would probably work pretty well as the landbase for the above-suggested deck:

22 Lands:

Lord_Grimm on Hell Boy

6 months ago

EJ!! Let's do this! This build is already tight, but here are my thoughts\suggestions...

Cards I'd consider cutting: Seize the Spoils, Reckless Endeavor, Daretti, Ingenious Iconoclast, Poison the Cup, Vengeful Reaper, Dream Devourer, Replicating Ring, Ward of Bones, Darksteel Forge, the flip tibalt guy, Ash Barrens, Cryptic Caves, Darksteel Citadel, Foreboding Ruins, Mortuary Mire, Zhalfirin Void

Cards I'd consider adding: Light Up the Stage, Chaos Wand, You Find Some Prisoners, Reckless Fireweaver, Valakut Exploration, Rakdos Charm, Murderous Rider, Praetor's Grasp, Rakdos Signet, Bojuka Bog, Luxury Suite, Blood Crypt, Haunted Ridge, Smoldering Marsh, Dragonskull Summit, Bloodstained Mire, Temple of Malice

I would also suggest swapping Red Elemental Blast for Pyroclasm... seems silly, but pyroclasm can be cast even if there are no blue targets. So may not be relevant, but could be randomly at some point.

Balaam__ on Vampire Party

7 months ago

Welcome to the game.

At first glance, there are two things that jump out.

1) This is not legal for the Modern format (Dirge of Dread and Vault of Whispers are emboldened in red to indicate they’re illegal in the format). This isn’t a big deal at all, as both can be substituted for different cards quite easily.

2) You could use some dual lands in your mana base. There are a huge variety of Modern legal lands that can produce and , some better (and therefore more expensive) than others. Top tier stuff would be Bloodstained Mire and Blood Crypt, but they’re also the most costly. Middle grade options are things like Blightstep Pathway  Flip or Haunted Ridge/Dragonskull Summit, and the cheapest (but still perfectly playable) duals would be lands that enter tapped—Bloodfell Caves, Cinder Barrens etc.

Any of the above would work here, the idea being to be able to play either a black or a red card as soon as possible, without having to wait because you don’t have the appropriate color.

Varamil on [Variant] Magic Noir

8 months ago

(printable version : )

Context

Mana management in Magic is not always optimal, and can even be very frustrating if the draw is really unbalanced. Moreover, if lands are vital at the beginning of the game, they usually pollute the deck more afterwards. On the other hand, this is part of the fun of the game and the art of creating effective decks in any situation.

If you really want to optimize a deck, I feel like you often have to use rare (and expensive) lands that allow you to clean up the deck (e.g., Wooded Foothills) or that provide mana in two colors of your choice (e.g., Badlands, Dragonskull Summit).

Anyway, that's the game, but I recently discovered another game that introduces a very interesting mana management mechanism: Mage Noir (check out their site). During my first play tests, I immediately liked the way mana was managed. There is no frustration of not having THE necessary color without swimming in mana, no problem of hand full of lands or no lands during many turns, and this system adds a very interesting tactical side.

The general logic is that each turn, players select 3 mana of the color of their choice. One part goes into their pool, but the other can be retrieved by the opponent on his next turn. So, you have to make your deal, but try not to favor your opponent.

I immediately thought that such a system, if it worked for Magic, would be very pleasant to use. So, I set about creating the variant described here.

Mana Pools

The principle introduced by Mage Noir is that each turn, the active player takes a certain amount of mana from the Infinite Pool and places them in the Channeled Pool. Then he can take some of this Channeled Pool to fill his Personal Pool.

A common feature of all the reserves presented below is that their contents are visible to all players at all times.

The Infinite Pool is composed of 6 mana colors, the 5 classic Magic colors plus the colorless "color" which becomes a color in its own right.

To make this mana pool, arrange the basic lands, face up, in 5 separate piles containing only lands of the same color (one pile of plains, another of islands...). For the colorless color, make a sixth pile with face-down cards (or any other type of card that you will not confuse with the 5 primary colors). These piles must be easily accessible by the players.

Ideally, you should have 20-25 lands in each pile, especially for the colors that are present in the decks that are played.

This pool is a common intermediate pool that will be replenished each turn by the players and after certain events. It is also in this pool that the players will draw to feed their Personal Pool.

It is composed of 2 distinct piles that can contain a varied number and type of mana. These 2 piles exist permanently even if one or both are empty. However, the identification or the positioning of these piles does not matter, they just have to be easily accessible to the players.

The details of its use are described in the paragraph New ability keyword: channeling X.

Corresponds to the classic Magic mana pool, the one that is replenished when you add mana to your mana pool, with the difference that it doesn't empty at the end of your turn.

Note that the direct consequence is that the notion of mana burn does not exist (anymore) in this variant of Magic (do I look old?).

This is a special mana pool used in special cases. It is mainly used to make certain mana of a player temporarily inaccessible. Each player has his own Stasis Pool.

See §Effects Involving Lands for full details, but in general, all effects that engage land or prevent land from being untapped will instead send mana from the Personal Pool into the Stasis Pool. How to recover this mana then depends on the effect.

Mana management

In this variant a new keyword appears: channeling X. It corresponds to an action which consists in:

  1. Take X mana from the Infinite Pool,

  2. Add them, one by one and alternately, to the two piles of the Channeled Pool, starting with the smallest pile. An empty pile is considered to be the smallest possible pile, and in case of a tie, the player performing the action chooses the pile.

This action cannot be interrupted from the moment it was started. No player (nor the player performing the channeling) may perform any other action until all the mana involved by the channeling has been added to the Channeled Pool.

If there is more than one mana involved (X ≥ 2), then the player performing the channeling chooses the order of adding mana

The X next to the keyword indicates the amount and type of mana the player can take from the Infinite Pool. It can be of several kinds:

  • A number: the player can take as much mana as the indicated quantity, distributed according to the colors of his choice, the mixture being completely possible. The colorless mana is a possibility as well as the "classic" colored mana.

  • Colorless mana (respecting the iconography of Magic: , ...): the player must take the indicated amount of colorless mana. He can't take white, blue, red, black or green mana instead.

  • Colored mana: the player must take a mana of the indicated color.

Here are some examples:

  • Channeling 2: the player chooses 2 mana of any color.

  • Channeling : the player takes 1 colorless mana and 2 blue mana.

On the side of the Channeled Pool, if for example the A pile contains 2 mana, and the B pile contains 3 mana, then for a channeling , the player can:

  1. Add to pile A

  2. Then to pile B

  3. And to pile A.

The order in the example could be or , but the A pile will always (in this case) have 2 more mana at the end of the action, and the B pile only 1 more mana.

The focus consists of taking X mana from the Infinite Pool and put it directly into your Personal Pool.

However, the mana thus recovered is returned to the channeled reserve at the end of the current turn if it has not been used (i.e. as for mana in the classic rules).

The same rules as for the channeling apply in terms of color restriction (ex: 2 ≠ ).

Ability to take X mana from a player's Personal Pool and place it in that player's Stasis Pool. Unless otherwise noted, the mana from the Stasis Pool returns to the player's Personal Pool during his next land clearing step.

The same rules as for the channeling apply in terms of color restriction (ex: 2 ≠ ).

The player who is the target of a dissipation must return X mana from his Personal and/or Stasis Pool to the Infinite Pool. If he does not have enough mana available, he must empty both his reserves.

The same rules as for the channeling apply in terms of color restriction (ex: 2 ≠ ).

During the untapping step, the active player additionally recovers mana from his Stasis Pool and places it in his Personal Pool, unless the mana was placed in stasis by an effect that specifies a particular condition for mana recovery (see §Effects Involving Lands).

After the draw step, during the beginning of the turn phase, a new step is added: the channeling. This step takes place as follows:

  1. The active player will make a channeling 3, it cannot be countered in any way.

  2. Players can then play instant, activate abilities (mana or not) following the classic Magic rules. Rituals and invocations (except flash) cannot be played.

  3. Finally, the active player chooses one of the two piles from the Channeled Pool and adds it to his Personal Pool.

The step is optional, but if it is done, it must be done in full. Moreover, if it is done, the player cannot play any more lands from his hand during this turn (except for the effect of a spell).

Thus, during the channeling, the active player must choose whether he prefers to place a land or to take mana from the Channeled Pool.

As soon as a card indicates that you can add any number of mana to your mana pool (lands, abilities, spells...) you must make a focus X instead, where X is exactly the mana indicated in the initial text.

So add to your mana pool becomes focus .

However, if the card that allows you to make a channeling is a land, you must sacrifice it and put it in your graveyard. Note that if an ability of a land is used and it does not generate mana, the land is not sacrificed, the land behaves as a simple permanent.

To pay the mana cost of a spell or ability, you must use the mana in your Personal Pool. The rules are as follows:

  • Colored mana has to be paid with mana of the same color,

  • Colorless mana has to be paid with mana of a different color than the card or with colorless mana. For example, the colorless mana of a red card cannot be paid with red mana, but a mixture of other colors can be used, not necessarily a single color. For multicolored cards, the possible colors are those that do not appear in the colored part of the spell casting cost (so for abilities you have to look at the spell casting cost and not the ability cost). The goal is to force monochrome decks to vary the amount of mana they channel, so that in the end they are not at an advantage over multicolored decks.

  • For artifacts, creatures with Devoid, or any other colorless card, the colorless mana cost must be paid with at least half the cost rounded up in colorless mana, with the rest of the cost to be paid with any colored mana. For example, an artifact with a summoning cost of 3 or 4 should be paid with 2 colorless mana and the rest in colored mana. As colorless mana becomes a color in its own right, the goal is to approach the same constraints as for colored costs.

  • Sunburst: no change except for colorless cards. For these, in order not to reduce the effect too much, the rule is adjusted. Colorless mana that normally must be used may be replaced by a colored mana if and only if only one mana of that color is used to pay the cost. For example, for a cost of with Sunburst, or can be used, but not . Colorless mana still does not count towards the effects of Sunburst.

This defines the mana to be used to pay the cost. The use of the mana thus spent depends on the type of card:

  • Cost to summon a Permanent: Mana stays with the permanent. Slide the spent mana under the permanent card. Ideally, you should put the cards in a staircase so that the mana attached to the permanent is always visible. If the permanent leaves the battlefield, the mana that was attached to it returns to the Channeled Pool following the same rules as for channeling (except that the mana does not come from the Infinite Pool).

  • Otherwise (spell, ability...): once the effect is resolved, the mana that has been spent returns to the Channeled Pool following the same rules as for channeling (except that the mana does not come from the Infinite Pool).

Remarks:

  • Ability color restrictions are based on the color of the card with the ability, even if an opponent has to pay the mana cost in the end. Ex: Mystical Dispute: the cost of must be paid with non-blue mana.

Adjustment of rules

As mana management is totally different and the interest of lands becomes limited (as they are single-use, see Activation of mana abilities), it is no longer necessary to build a deck with lands. As a result, the minimum number of cards that a deck must contain is reduced to 40 cards instead of 60 (lands usually represent about one third of a classic deck).

Regarding lands, they are still allowed but there is now a limit of 8 lands in a deck, and each land (identical name) can only be present 4 times. Moreover, as mentioned in §New game phase: Channeling, a land can only be put into play from the hand if the player has not channeled this turn.

Ideally, you should limit the cards to a maximum of 3, if you are making a deck specifically for this variant, but the goal is to be able to play easily, so the easiest thing to do is to just remove the lands from your existing decks and enjoy!

Nevertheless, a number of effects must be adapted to the new number of cards.

As mentioned in the previous paragraph, some general rules must be adjusted:

  • The starting hand is 5 cards instead of 7, but the (basic) maximum number of cards remains 7.

  • All effects based on the number of cards in a library must consider a number of cards divided by 2, rounded up. If the targeted player's library has less than 20 cards [...] becomes If the targeted player's library has less than 10 cards [...]. Or Put the top 3 cards of the targeted library under it becomes Put the top 2 cards of the targeted library under it.

  • By extension, all the effects of draw, mil, scry... also have the number of cards concerned divided by 2, rounded up.

  • Spell casting costs including a cost in : Since mana can be accumulated from turn to turn, it can be easier to cast overpowered spells. Therefore, the cost of mana in must be multiplied by 2, so (so if the cost was already , then it becomes !).

  • Effects involving a number of lands are generally replaced by a devotion on the associated color (affinity, crossing...). See §Effects Involving Lands for more details.

  • Number of lands of a color: replaced by a Devotion to the concerned color. For artifact lands consider a devotion to the colorless divided by 2, rounded down.

  • Basic Land Affinity: to determine the cost reduction, consider that you have as much land as the value of your Devotion to the color of the land concerned. Ex: Affinity with Swamps => the cost of the spell can be reduced by X colorless where X is your Devotion to Black.

  • Improvise: no change.

  • Land cycling: the player can perform a Channeling 2, but only using mana of the color of the indicated field. Ex: Mountain Cycling = Channeling .

  • Landfall: is triggered if a land has actually been put into play, or if an effect/spell that should have put a land into play is resolved (but has in fact been replaced by a focus, see the point above). Channeling and focus do not therefore by default trigger the ability.

  • Landwalk:

    • Possible as soon as a mana of the concerned color is attached to a permanent of the targeted opponent. Ex: Mountainwalk => creature cannot be blocked as long as there is Red mana attached to an opponent's permanent.

    • In the case of supertype (e.g., legendary land), then the creature cannot be blocked as long as the opponent has a permanent of the specified type (e.g., legendary creature/enchantment)

    • In the case of subtypes (e.g., snowy forest), then the subtype is ignored.

For the next effects, the following rules apply in general:

  • If the initial effect specifies a (combination of) land color, then the targeted mana must be of the same (combination of) color.

  • For artifact lands, consider colorless mana.

  • If the number of targeted lands is 2 or more, a combination of land and mana can be used respecting the indicated ratio.

  • If the effect requires a quantity to be resolved, the player must respect the quantity requested (either in land or in mana). If there is not enough land/mana the spell cannot be resolved.

On the effects side, they can be replaced by:

  • Tap X Lands (spell effect): stasis X. Ratio of 1 land to 1 mana.

  • Untap X Lands (spell effect): focus X. Ratio of 1 land to 1 mana.

  • Destroy X Lands: dissipation XX. Ratio of 1 land to 2 mana.

  • Sacrifice X Lands: dissipation XX. Ratio of 1 land to 2 mana.

  • Return X lands to his owner's hand: stasis XX. Ratio of 1 land to 2 mana.

  • Exile X land: dissipation XX. Ratio of 1 land to 2 mana.

  • Put X land into play (spell effect): focus X. If the lands arrive in play tapped, then the mana is placed in the Stasis Pool instead of the Personal Pool. Ratio of 1 land to 1 mana.

  • Exile: the mana attached to the exiled card (if it was in play) remains attached to the card during its exile, and returns with it if it leaves the exile.

  • Ingest: no change because it concerns only one card.

  • Mil: the number of cards is divided by 2, rounded up.

  • Monarch: no change because it concerns only one card.

  • Scry: the number of cards is divided by 2, rounded up

  • Ripple: the number of cards is divided by 2, rounded up.

  • Threshold: no change, the other adjustments mean that normally the cemetery does not fill up much faster.

  • Sunburst: no change except for the colorless cards (see §Pay a mana cost)

  • Surveil: the number of cards is divided by 2, rounded up.

It is likely that some cards will become too strong with the new mana mechanics, if this is the case then it would be wise not to use them. Here is a non-exhaustive list of such cards:

  • To be defined, feel free to send me cards that should be banned.

However, if possible, if by slightly adjusting the text of the card it is possible to return to an acceptable effect (compared to what it can produce with the classic rules), then it can be used. Here is a non-exhaustive list of such cards:

  • Mind Funeral: will probably mill the whole deck at once, but if we consider Mil 8 instead (so that 4 cards are actually discarded, see §Abilities) then the card becomes fully playable again. You can also consider rolling a die to discard 4+X cards.

  • Feel free to send me other cards that should be adjusted.

The main thing in these cases is to reach an agreement between players before starting the game.

Improve the game material

Mage Noir also uses cards to symbolize mana, but in the end using tokens of adapted colors makes the management much simpler: it takes much less space, it is easier to identify the mana, when tapping/untapping you don't need to manage the piles so that the mana remains visible...

Personally, I use colored plastic crystals, but cubes, discs, wood or plastic (metal?) are just as good, the trick is to have the right colors if possible.

Clearly, it's not necessary, but it makes the game much more enjoyable, I think.

Conclusion

These rules have been tested on a number of different decks: aggro, mil, tribal, discard, madness... but never played at a competitive level. I did not observe any noticeable imbalance, I even found that some "less good" decks managed to compete better against the other decks.

The mana management is less random, more balanced between players, there is really a tactical aspect on the choice of mana or on the fact to destroy a permanent. The mana curve is no longer linear, there are strong moments and weak moments, a bit like in a real fight, where when you have just cast a big spell, you are a priori a bit out of breath.

I've been away from Magic for a while, but this idea really motivated me to come back to it and in the end, I really enjoyed playing it again using this variant.

So, I hope you'll have fun testing it, and giving me feedback to improve it!

multimedia on Korvold Loves Treasure

8 months ago

Hey, well done on a budget, nice foil Goldspan and SL Dreadbore :)

Consider more ramp with Korvold? More one and two drop ramp sources:

Korvold is powerful as Commander when playing lots of ramp since it helps to cast him faster and then that ramp can fuel his sacrifice. This makes playing lots of redundant ramp actually a strength.


Animation Module + Ashnod's Altar + Korvold is a combo to draw as many cards as you want, make Korvold huge, make as much colorless mana as you want. Without the combo Module is a nice repeatable source of tokens for sac fodder because of Korvold.

Add Pitiless Plunderer to create tons of treasures. Plunderer and a different sac outlet such as Viscera Seer or Goblin Bombardment could replace Ashnod's Altar since it only costs 1 mana (1 treasure) to make a Servo with Module. Bombardment is an excellent low CMC budget sac outlet.

Ramunap Excavator lets you abuse lands as the permanent to sac with Korvold. Caustic Caterpillar and Seal of Primordium are upgrades for artifact/enchantment removal spells because they can sac themselves as well as be saced at instant speed. Plaguecrafter is a nice creature removal effect in multiplayer Commander who sacs himself.

Prossh, Skyraider of Kher as the high end has synergy with Korvold. It's a sac outlet and it makes Kobold tokens to sac. Farseek is an upgrade for Rampant Growth because you have Overgrown Tomb and Stomping Ground. Harrow is an upgrade for Cultivate because you sac a land to cast it.

Path of Ancestry, Jund Panorama, Karplusan Forest, Dragonskull Summit, Rootbound Crag, Cinder Glade, Smoldering Marsh are some budget land upgrades to consider.

If interested I offer more advice including suggestions of cuts to consider. Good luck with your deck.

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