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L.W. Grace Realty: Magic at Your Fingertips

Commander / EDH BRG (Jund) Elementals Landfall Tokens

MTGBurgeoning


LORD WINDGRACE

Legendary Planeswalker — Windgrace

+2: Discard a card, then draw a card. If a land card is discarded this way, draw an additional card.

−3: Return up to two target land cards from your graveyard to the battlefield.

−11: Destroy up to six target nonland permanents, then create six 2/2 green Cat Warrior creature tokens with forestwalk.

LORD WINDGRACE CAN BE YOUR COMMANDER.

In this Lord Windgrace EDH/Commander deck, we are creating a "lands matter" theme. There will be landfall synergies and numerous ways to get lands onto the battlefield from our hand, library and graveyard. Additionally, there will be a graveyard sub-theme included in this deck in order to take greater advantage of Lord Windgrace's first two planeswalker abilities. As has been customary with the MTG Burgeoning deck-building series, the first 12 cards are provided and then it's up to the MTG Burgeoning community to build the rest of the deck. So let's begin with the first dozen!

Here is an MTG Burgeoning YouTube video discussing the first 12 cards added to this deck:

  1. Lotus Cobra: Lotus Cobra can create an obscene amount of mana just by sitting on our side of the battlefield. Its landfall trigger is one of the most powerful in Magic: the Gathering. This deck list will include many, many fetch lands which will work double-duty in triggering Lotus Cobra's landfall ability. A fetch land comes into play, we add one mana of any color to our mana pool, we sacrifice the fetch land, search our library, put a land into play, we add one mana of any color to our mana pool. If this land is untapped, we net three mana that turn. For the purposes of foreshadowing, the next 12 cards added to this deck will only make Lotus Cobra stronger: Ways to get lands into play in volume and from everywhere. With the various ways we will be able to play lands and how frequently, Lotus Cobra can ramp us several turns ahead of our opponents.

  2. Scute Swarm: Scute Swarm is a win condition. A bonkers, ludicrous, unreal win condition. Its landfall ability is extremely powerful and if left unchecked Scute Swarm can spiral out of control until the battlefield is swarming with creature tokens, leading to imminent victory. Whenever a land enters the battlefield under our control, we create a 1/1 green insect creature token. Eh. Not much to see here. HOWEVER...if we control six or more lands, then create a token that's a copy of Scute Swarm instead. We will EASILY control six or more lands. Also, as we redundantly foreshadow once more, the next 12 cards added to this deck will only make Scute Swarm stronger: Ways to get lands into play in volume and from everywhere. With the various ways we will be able to play lands and how frequently, Scute Swarm can create a plethora of creature tokens and lead us to victory.

  3. Moraug, Fury of Akoum: Moraug, Fury of Akoum is a game-ender. Each creature we control gets +1/+0 for each time it has attacked this turn. Moraug, Fury of Akoum's landfall ability synergizes with its first ability magnificently, like peanut butter and jelly. Whenever a land enters the battlefield under our control, if it's our pre-combat main phase, there's an additional combat phase after this phase. At the beginning of that combat, untap all creatures you control. Each land that enters our battlefield during our pre-combat main phase nets us an additional combat phase. SCORE! After putting mulpiple lands into play and sending a swath of creatures into multiple combats, each time the power of each creature increasing by one with each subsequent combat, we should be able to overwhelm our opponents. FINISH THEM!

  4. Valakut Exploration: This is a SNEAKY good enchantment from Zendikar Rising. Whenever a land enters the battlefield under our control, we exile the top card of our library. We may play that card for as long as it remains exiled. Card advantage!! Yes, we can play lands as long as we have land drops available. #WeWillHaveMultipleLandDropsAvailableEachTurn. Oh, but we're not finished yet! At the beginning of our end step, if there are cards exiled with Valakut Exploration, we put them into our graveyard and then Valakut Exploration deals that much damage to each opponent. Card advantage and...direct damage!! YAY RED! The card advantage is awesome. We should be ramping full-steam ahead, which will allow us to cast additional spells from exile with Valakut Exploration as well as play additional lands. The additional burn to our opponents is a nice bonus, particularly if there are lands heading to our graveyard at the beginning of our end step. With so many ways to get those lands out of our graveyard and into play, either directly or indirectly, our graveyard provides us with more spells to cast AND an additional land-drop outlet!

  5. Omnath, Locus of Rage: Omnath, Locus of Rage creates a 5/5 red and green elemental creature token whenever a land enters the battlefield under our control. Also, this elemental has a nifty little death trigger that will Lightning Bolt any target: Whenever Omnath, Locus of Rage or another elemental we control dies, Omnath, Locus of Rage deals three damage to any target. Netting a 5/5 creature token each time a land enters the battlefield under our control is a tremendous value. Besides, we can't have a dedicated "lands matter" deck without Omnath, Locus of Rage!

  6. Rampaging Baloths: More creatures! Rampaging Baloths creates a 4/4 green beast creature token whenever a land enters the battlefield under our control. These creature tokens are not as beefy as the elemental creature tokens created by Omnath, Locus of Rage, but netting a 4/4 creature token each time a land enters the battlefield under our control is a great value nonetheless.

  7. Tireless Tracker: Whenever a land enters the battlefield under our control, Tireless Tracker allows us to investigate (we create a colorless Clue artifact token with ", sacrifice this artifact: Draw a card."). Whenever we sacrifice a Clue, we put a +1/+1 counter on Tireless Tracker. Since we are not playing , we do not have access to Tatyova, Benthic Druid or Aesi, Tyrant of Gyre Strait. Tireless Tracker is our best way to generate card draw from lands entering our battlefield.

  8. Avenger of Zendikar: The big, bad voodoo daddy! When Avenger of Zendikar enters the battlefield, we create a 0/1 green plant creature token for each land we control. We will create A LOT of plant creature tokens. Additionally, whenever a land enters the battlefield under our control, we may put a +1/+1 counter on each plant creature we control. We will put A LOT of +1 +1 counters on our plant creature tokens. Avenger of Zendikar is a very powerful creature outside of a "lands matter" deck, and its power grows exponentially when included in a deck like this one.

  9. Scapeshift: Scapeshift allows us to sacrifice any number of lands, then search our library for up to that many land cards and put them onto the battlefield tapped. This mass-landfall-triggering-enabler can be game-ending. Imagine if Moraug, Fury of Akoum is under our control with a swath of creatures. Imagine if Lotus Cobra and Valakut Exploration are paired on our board. Imagine the lands we can put onto the battlefield. Fetches? Utility lands? Additionally, Scapeshift fills our graveyard with lands which can act as an additional land-drop outlet. Scapeshift's versatility is amazing in a deck that cares about lands.

  10. Crucible of Worlds: Crucible of Worlds permits us to play lands from our graveyard. ANY land. Another fetch land? Check. No problem. Scapeshift fills our graveyard with lands. Crucible of Worlds brings them back to the battlefield. Imagine the value of having additional land drops with a fetch land in the graveyard and Crucible of Worlds under our control. Play a fetch land from our graveyard, trigger multiple landfall abilities, sacrifice it, put a land from our library into play, trigger multiple landfall abilities. Play a fetch land from our graveyard, trigger multiple landfall abilities, sacrifice it, put a land from our library into play, trigger multiple landfall abilities. Play a fetch land from our graveyard, trigger multiple landfall abilities, sacrifice it, put a land from our library into play, trigger multiple landfall abilities. Play a fetch land from our graveyard, trigger multiple landfall abilities, sacrifice it, put a land from our library into play, trigger multiple landfall abilities. Lather. Rinse. Repeat. POWER.

  11. Life from the Loam: Staying with our graveyard theme, Life from the Loam returns up to three target land cards from our graveyard to our hand. This sorcery also has dredge 3, so if we would draw a card, we may mill three cards instead. If we do, then we return this card from our graveyard to our hand. Cast Life from the Loam and return lands from our graveyard to our hand. Play lands. Dredge 3 Life from the Loam, mill cards from our library (lands) and return Life from the Loam to our hand. Cast Life from the Loam and return lands from our graveyard to our hand. Play lands. Dredge 3 Life from the Loam, mill cards from our library (lands) and return Life from the Loam to our hand. Cast Life from the Loam and return lands from our graveyard to our hand. Play lands. Dredge 3 Life from the Loam, mill cards from our library (lands) and return Life from the Loam to our hand. Lather. Rinse. Repeat. POWER. Life from the Loam is going to do work in this deck!

  12. Ancient Greenwarden: Okay, so, yes, this exists. This creature exists. Someone decided to create a creature from a combination of Crucible of Worlds and a landfall-centric Yarok, the Desecrated and slap these abilities on the body of a 5/7 elemental with reach for . WHAT!?!! SERIOUSLY??! Thank you...? Ancient Greenwarden may prove to be the single, most powerful card in this deck list. WE DOUBLE EACH LANDFALL TRIGGER. How mind-boggling is this? Create two creature tokens by...putting a land into play. Generate two mana of any colors by...putting a land into play. Gain two additional combat phases by...putting a land into play. Put two +1 +1 counters on every plant creature token we control by...putting a land into play. Double the number of Scute Swarms twice by...putting a land into play. Ancient Greenwarden strengthens a "lands matter" deck like no other card in Magic: the Gathering's history.

And that's the way the news goes. The MTG Burgeoning community will shape the rest of the deck. Leave suggestions for the next 12 cards to be added here or in the comments section of Episode #250 (see above) from MTG Burgeoning's YouTube channel. Our next focus? Ways to get lands into play in volume and from everywhere.

Good luck, and thank you in advance!

Here is an MTG Burgeoning YouTube video discussing the next 12 cards added to this deck:

  1. Reshape the Earth: Insanity. Unadulterated, unreal, mind-boggling insanity. These are some words that can be used to adjectify Reshape the Earth. We pay . We search our library for up to ten land cards and put them onto the battlefield tapped. Notice the text. It says: “Search our library for up to ten land cards.” It doesn’t say: “Search our library for up to ten BASIC LAND CARDS.” Any. Ten. Lands. Imagine the possibilities: Dark Depths, Vesuva, Thespian's Stage, Urza's Tower, Urza's Power Plant, Urza's Mine, Ancient Tomb, Temple of the False God, Field of the Dead and Command Tower. Vesuva becomes a copy of Urza's Tower, Dark Depths or Field of the Dead. Or: Gruul Turf, Golgari Rot Farm, Rakdos Carnarium, Guildless Commons, Evolving Wilds, Fabled Passage, Terramorphic Expanse, Prismatic Vista, Bloodstained Mire and Verdant Catacombs. The ten lands enter the battlefield and trigger each of our landfall abilities ten times. These lands see each other enter the battlefield simultaneously, and due to the enter the battlefield triggers of Gruul Turf, Golgari Rot Farm, Rakdos Carnarium and Guildless Commons, we can return to our hand any four of Evolving Wilds, Fabled Passage, Terramorphic Expanse, Prismatic Vista, Bloodstained Mire and/or Verdant Catacombs, allowing us to play them, trigger our landfall abilities, tap them, sacrifice them, search our library, put these lands onto the battlefield and trigger our landfall abilities again. With at least four available land drops on our turn we can trigger each of our landfall abilities 18 times!!!! There aren’t enough adjectives to describe this sorcery from Zendikar Rising. Trust me. I tried!

  2. Nahiri's Lithoforming: Nahiri's Lithoforming DOES IT ALL! We sacrifice X lands. By doing so, we get land cards into our graveyard which will act as an outlet for future land drops. For each land we sacrifice, we draw a card. This puts more lands into our hand. We may play X additional lands this turn. We get X additional land drops, possibly from our graveyard! Lands we play will enter the battlefield tapped during our turn, but that’s inconsequential. For the purposes of this deck’s intended construction, Nahiri's Lithoforming draws us X cards and lets us play an additional X lands (our sacrificed lands will find their way back onto the battlefield). Land drop enabler. Drawing cards. Playing extra lands. All from one red sorcery. POWER.

  3. Splendid Reclamation: Speaking of land cards in our graveyard, Splendid Reclamation returns all land cards from our graveyard to the battlefield tapped. Similar to Nahiri’s Lithforming, the last ability is insignificant to us. Triggering our landfall abilities is the primary focus of this deck, and any land entering the battlefield under our control will achieve this goal, tapped or untapped.

  4. Realms Uncharted: This sneaky-good instant from Rise of the Eldrazi allows us to search our library for any four lands with different names and reveal them to an opponent. That opponent chooses two of these land cards to go to the graveyard and we put the other two lands into our hand. As noted earlier, we anticipate putting land cards into our graveyard. We plan to use our graveyard as an additional outlet for playing lands. By casting Realms Uncharted, we, in effect, will provide ourselves with four lands to play, triggering our landfall abilities. How about searching for four different fetch lands?

  5. Azusa, Lost but Seeking: She may be lost, but she has found a home in this deck! Azusa, Lost but Seeking allows us to play two additional lands during our turns. TWO MORE LAND DROPS! In a deck that wants to put as many lands onto the battlefield as possible, Azusa, Lost but Seeking gifts us with two extra land drops each turn. Have some lands in hand (or in the graveyard) prior to casting her because she will be a target for immediate removal.

  6. The Gitrog Monster: DISCLAIMER: This is not THE The Gitrog Monster CEDH deck. No. Not at all. The inclusion of The Gitrog Monster is due to its versatile abilities. At the beginning of our upkeep, we sacrifice The Gitrog Monster unless we sacrifice a land. This frog horror can fill our graveyard with land cards, for which, as aforementioned, we have planned. We may play an additional land on each of our turns. Another land drop! Finally, whenever one or more land cards are put into our graveyard from anywhere, we draw a card. Let’s review. The Gitrog Monster ensures possible land drops by creating a sacrifice outlet for our lands. It allows us to play an additional land during our turns AND it provides card draw. As mentioned earlier in this description, The Gitrog Monster’s inclusion into this deck is warranted based on its synergistic abilities with the focus of this deck.

  7. Exploration: As creatures are so easy to remove from the battlefield, it is important that we include other card types that will allow us to secure the type of deck synergy for which we are planning. Enter: Exploration. A very affordable-to-cast enchantment lets us play an additional land during each of our turns. That's it. Nothing more to add here.

  8. Wayward Swordtooth: Wayward Swordtooth lets us play an additional land during each of our turns as well. Its 5/5 body is impressive, as long as we have the City’s Blessing (if we control ten or more permanents, we get the City’s Blessing). We will have ten or more permanents. A 5/5 creature that lets us play an additional land on our turns for is excellent value.

  9. Mina and Denn, Wildborn: Hopefully a theme has become inordinately present during this subsection of cards: PLAYING ADDITIONAL LANDS! Mina and Denn, Wildborn provides another additional land drop. However, their other ability can be very valuable as well. If we tap and return a land we control to our hand then target creature gains trample until end of turn. Enabling trample on a creature is okay, but providing an outlet to put a land onto the battlefield by returning a land we control to our hand is much, much more valuable!

  10. Ramunap Excavator: This is a walking Crucible of Worlds. Or, is it more appropriate to say it’s a “slithering” Crucible of Worlds? Either way, Ramunap Excavator lets us play land cards from our graveyard and provides another graveyard option if Crucible of Worlds is, or more likely, WHEN Crucible of Worlds is targeted for removal.

  11. Burgeoning: Our YouTube channel’s namesake! Whenever an opponent plays a land we can put a land onto the battlefield. This enchantment forces our opponents to think twice about playing their lands each turn, unless they wittingly allow us to spiral out of control by dropping land after land after land. That’s what good opponents do. They play the cards in their hands. They play the lands in their hands. They ignore the real estate piling up on our side of the battlefield while triggering every possible landfall ability in sight. Perchance to dream!

  12. Sword of the Animist: According to EDHREC.com, Rampant Growth is the fourth-most played sorcery in the EDH/Commander format over the past two years. Its modest power/toughness boost notwithstanding, it’s Sword of the Animist’s Rampant Growth attack trigger that is the most attractive feature of this card…aside from the amazing art by Daniel Ljunggren. Whenever equipped creature attacks we search our library for a basic land card and put it onto the battlefield tapped. This is another land outlet in a deck that wants as many as possible.

And that's the way the news goes. The MTG Burgeoning community will continue to shape the rest of the deck. Leave suggestions for the next 12 cards to be added here or in the comments section of Episode #264 (see above) from MTG Burgeoning's YouTube channel. Our continued focus? Ways to get lands into play in volume and from everywhere.

Here is an MTG Burgeoning YouTube video discussing the next 12 cards added to this deck:

  1. Roiling Regrowth: An improvement over Harrow, Roiling Regrowth puts a land into our graveyard and fetches-out two tapped basic lands from our library to the battlefield. If we have an available land drop and a play-a-land-from-our-graveyard enabler, then the sacrificed land from Roiling Regrowth creates an additional land outlet. Under this scenario, we can net three separate landfall triggers for the investment of and at instant speed.

  2. Harrow: The only functional difference between Roiling Regrowth and Harrow is that Harrow requires us to sacrifice a land as part of the spell's casting cost. If an opponent counterspells Harrow, we lose the spell, the sacrificed land and the mana invested. If left alone, Harrow replicates the return of Roiling Regrowth: Three potential landfall triggers for and at instant speed.

  3. Springbloom Druid: Functionally, Springbloom Druid is a walking Roiling Regrowth. When it enters the battlefield, we may sacrifice a land. If we do, then we search our library for up to two basic land cards and put them onto the battlefield tapped. Similarly to Roiling Regrowth and Harrow, Springbloom Druid creates a potential scenario of netting three landfall triggers for . It's not at instant speed, but it leaves behind a 1/1 body for chump-blocking and future recursion.

  4. Crop Rotation: Our trend of getting lands onto the battlefield from our graveyard and library continues with Crop Rotation. As an additional cost to cast this spell, we must sacrifice a land. We search our library for a land card, and put that card onto the battlefield. Notice the text. It says: "ANY land card." It doesn't say: "any BASIC land card." We provide an additional land-drop outlet by sacrificing a land and put any land from our library onto the battlefield. Once we unveil the list of lands for this deck, the significance and power of Crop Rotation will be more evident, therefore further justifying its presence in the 99.

  5. Skyshroud Claim: We can search our library for up to two Forest cards and put them onto the battlefield. Skyshroud Claim does not tap these lands and does not restrict us to fetching-out basic lands. ANY TWO Forest CARDS. Stomping Ground, Overgrown Tomb, Cinder Glade, Sheltered Thicket, Bayou and Taiga are Forest cards.

  6. Kodama's Reach: This ramp spell is so good it was reprinted with a different name. For we search our library for up to two basic land cards, reveal those cards, put one onto the battlefield tapped and the other into our hand. Putting a land into our hand enables a land-drop outlet. Casting Kodama's Reach should net us two landfall triggers.

  7. Cultivate: See Kodama's Reach.

  8. Creeping Renaissance: This is another way to get land cards from our graveyard and back onto the battlefield, eventually. When we cast Creeping Renaissance, we choose a permanent type. We return all cards of the chosen type from our graveyard to our hand. We can also cast this spell for its flashback cost of . We don't HAVE to choose land as our permanent type. The option to select other permanent types is an added bonus to this spell. For the purposes of this deck's focus, we will most likely choose "land."

  9. Living Twister: This elemental from War of the Spark offers interesting abilities. We can pay , discard a land card and deal two points of damage to any target. This could be beneficial in Shocking mana dorks, Generals/Commanders and/or Planeswalkers. This ability is enhanced if we can play land cards from our graveyard: Pay , discard a land card, Shock something, play that land. Living Twister's second ability is even more powerful. We can pay and return a tapped land we control to our hand. No lands to play with three available land drops this turn? Tap a Forest, pay , activate Living Twister's ability, return the Forest to our hand and play it. Tap a Forest, pay , activate Living Twister's ability, return the Forest to our hand and play it. Tap a Forest, pay , activate Living Twister's ability, return the Forest to our hand and play it. Living Twister provides another way to get lands onto the battlefield and trigger our landfall abilities in addition to adding a relevant source of removal.

  10. Oracle of Mul Daya: This green elf shaman from Zendikar allows us to play an additional land on each of our turns. Unfortunately, we must play with the top card of our library revealed, but we may play lands from the top of our library. I despise sharing information about my deck with my opponents. I will not include Oracle of Mul Daya in a lot of decks because of this brazen flaunting of each card on top of our library. In this deck, Oracle of Mul Daya's more beneficial abilities are just too strong to ignore. She gives us an additional land drop and another outlet for playing lands. This completely encapsulates the theme of this deck. Oracle of Mul Daya's presence in this deck is warranted whether I like it or not...and I don't.

  11. Nylea's Intervention: As we wind down our "Lands Lands Everywhere" theme, next up is a sorcery from Theros Beyond Death. Nylea's Intervention provides two modes from which to choose. For we search our library for up to X land cards, reveal them and put them into our hand, or Nylea's Intervention deals twice X damage to each creature with flying. There may be instances in which Nylea's Intervention's second mode is selected. However, its primary purpose is to fill our hand with lands.

  12. Borborygmos Enraged: This massive cyclops from Gatecrash synergizes well with this deck. We can discard a land card and Borborygmos Enraged deals three damage to any target. Similar to Living Twister, if we have a play-a-land-from-our-graveyard enabler, then we can discard a land card, Lightning Bolt something and then play that same land from our graveyard. Additionally, whenever Borborygmos Enraged deals combat damage to a player, we reveal the top three cards of our library. Put all land cards revealed this way into our hand and the rest into our graveyard. Borborygmos Enraged can get lands into our graveyard with a Lightning Bolt bonus AND get lands into our hand. These abilities help to strengthen an already strong theme in this deck. Under the right set of circumstances, Borborygmos Enraged can be a win condition. Imagine a scenario with Borborygmos Enraged, Living Twister, Azusa, Lost but Seeking and Crucible of Worlds under our control. Tap a Forest, pay to activate Living Twister, return the Forest to our hand, discard it with Borborygmos Enraged, Lightning Bolt any target and then play the Forest from our graveyard. Repeat this process twice more and net three Lightning Bolts and three separate landfall triggers. VALUE!

And that's the way the news goes. The MTG Burgeoning community will continue to shape the rest of the deck. Our next focus? Removal! Leave suggestions for up to 12 removal spells here or in the comments section of Episode #271 (see above) from MTG Burgeoning's YouTube channel.

Thank you in advance!

Here is an MTG Burgeoning YouTube video discussing the removal spells added to this deck:

  1. Assassin's Trophy: This spell destroys any target permanent an opponent controls at instant speed. Gifting the controller of this permanent with a free basic land is not optimal, but there are myriad problematic and troublesome cards wherein swapping a basic land for its destruction is preferable.

  2. Beast Within: This spell destroys any target permanent. The controller of the permanent receives a 3/3 green beast creature token. This creature is much less important than destroying a problematic permanent.

  3. Deathsprout: Murder + Rampant Growth = Deathsprout. This instant provides the best of both worlds as we can destroy a target creature search our library for a basic land card and put it onto the battlefield tapped, thereby triggering our landfall abilities.

  4. Putrefy: Destroy target artifact or creature and it can't be regenerated. Removal options are always favorable.

  5. Krosan Grip: This is our insurance against the combo player who is trying to win the game by abusing an overpowered artifact or/and enchantment. The split second mechanic is SO underrated. As long as Krosan Grip is on the stack, players can't cast spells or activate abilities that aren't mana abilities. This provides us the opportunity to destroy a target artifact or enchantment without fear of countermagic.

  6. Hagra Mauling  : Most likely, Hagra Mauling   is an over-costed Murder. Although it is possible, it is unlikely that an opponent does not control any basic lands, meaning that we will destroy a target creature for . However, if needed, we can flip Hagra Mauling   into Hagra Broodpit   and play it as a land, thereby triggering our many landfall abilities. Options!

  7. Pernicious Deed: Originally printed in Apocalypse, Pernicious Deed is one of the most powerful removal spells in the format. We pay , and then sacrifice Pernicious Deed in order to destroy each artifact, creature, and enchantment with converted mana cost X or less. If equals , then we wipe out every creature token on the battlefield in addition to all of those Mana Crypts.

  8. Necromantic Selection: For , we destroy all creatures and then we return a creature card put into a graveyard this way to the battlefield under our control. Any. Creature. Destroyed. This. Way. It's a black zombie in addition to its other colors and types. We get back our best creature. Or we get one of our opponent's best creatures. Or we get the best creature on the battlefield. This pseudo-recursive ability makes Necromantic Selection a very versatile removal spell. We have a creature under our control at the end of our turn, something that generally is lacking after casting a board wipe.

  9. In Garruk's Wake: The converted mana cost is high but so is the reward. In Garruk's Wake destroys all creatures and planeswalkers we don't control. This selective board wipe will leave our opponents vulnerable to our swaths of creatures and help to ensure a hassle-free combat.

  10. Blasphemous Act: For the purposes of clarity, we will never cast Blasphemous for more than , most likely. Creatures run rampant in this format, and it's reasonable to think that turning a Mountain sideways in order to deliver 13 points of damage to each creature is easily achievable.

And that's the way the news goes. The MTG Burgeoning community will continue to shape the rest of the deck. There are upwards to 12 slots remaining in the deck. What do we add? More ramp? More lands matter cards? More recursion? More removal? More landfall triggers? Leave suggestions for up to 12 more spells here or in the comments section of Episode #279 (see above) from MTG Burgeoning's YouTube channel.

Thank you in advance!

Here is an MTG Burgeoning YouTube video showcasing the final 13 spells included in this deck:

  1. Ashaya, Soul of the Wild: This elemental from Zendikar Rising makes nontoken creatures we control Forest lands in addition to their other types. This allows our nontoken creatures to enter the battlefield and trigger our landfall abilities. Including 40 lands in this deck is not enough. Including multiple modal double-faced cards (MDFCs) from Zendikar Rising that can be played as lands is not enough. So, naturally, we had to make every creature in the deck a Forest land. Lord Windgrace is taking the concept of "lands matter" very seriously! Additionally, Ashya, Soul of the Wild's power and toughness are each equal to the number of lands we control and its converted mana cost is only . Imagine if it had evasion...

  2. Retreat to Hagra: Retreat to Hagra is an enchantment that provides two options for its landfall triggers. Either target creature gets +1/+0 and gains deathtouch until end of turn or each opponent loses one life and we gain one life. Most likely the latter option will be chosen as each opponent is drained and we receive an uptick in life. Under the right circumstances, we can consider Retreat to Hagra a win condition by utilizing its second landfall option (think: Ancient Greenwarden).

  3. Radha, Heart of Keld: Radha, Heart of Keld is a 3/3 for and has three abilities attached to her. Her first ability gives her first strike if it's our turn. Her second ability allows us to look at the top card of our library any time and permits us to play lands from the top of our library. Lastly, if we pay , then Radha, Heart of Keld gets +X/+X until end of turn, where X is the number of lands we control. All of this on a creature with a converted mana cost of THREE!??! It's Radha, Heart of Keld's second ability that is her most useful for the purposes of this deck. We have numerous spells that allow us to play additional lands during our turns. Radha, Heart of Keld provides an additional outlet for playing lands outside of our hand or graveyard. Having first strike during our turn is okay, and the temporary power and toughness boosts are valuable (albeit without evasion), but Radha, Heart of Keld's got it where it counts: She has her way with lands!

  4. Tectonic Reformation: Tectonic Reformation synergizes amazingly with the deck and can be sneaky, sneaky powerful. For just , each land card in our hand has cycling . Do we have Crucible of Worlds or Ramunap Excavator under our control? Pay , cycle a land, draw a card and then play the discarded land from our graveyard. Do we have Creeping Renaissance, Life from the Loam or Splendid Reclamation in our hand? Pay , cycle a land, draw a card and then cast one of the aforementioned spells to get the land back. This is all about card advantage! There are numerous ways to get lands out of the graveyard in this deck. Tectonic Reformation provides an outlet for putting lands into our graveyard and rewards us with a card each time. Lastly, we can cycle Tectonic Reformation for . Thank you Modern Horizons!

  5. Constant Mists: THIS IS MEAN. THIS IS NASTY. THIS IS EGREGIOUS. THIS IS CALLOUS. THIS IS MALICIOUS. THIS IS VILE. THIS IS DITRY. THIS IS.....not meant for meta-game play.....most likely. With multiple ways of playing lands in this deck readily established, Constant Mists can be cast over and over and over and over and over...again. We cast Constant Mists, sacrifice a land for its buyback cost, return Constant Mists to our hand and then, most conceivably, just play the sacrificed land during our turn, creating a loop of never-ending Constant Mists-casting. YAY! Fun.....? Countermagic could interfere, in addition to graveyard-hate cards like Leyline of the Void and Rest in Peace. However, in LGS and league-play, I'm willing to risk it. For the purposes of a healthy meta-game, I most likely will not risk it. MOST LIKELY.

  6. Zuran Orb: This card was printed over 25 years ago and has not seen a meaningful reprint since. TWENTY-FIVE YEARS! Zuran Orb is going to do magnificent things in this deck. It's a free spell as it costs to cast. Zuran Orb lets us sacrifice a land and gain two life. We get lands into our graveyard, enabling an outlet to play them from our graveyard, thereby triggering our landfall abilities. We gain two life each time...and it's free! Everything about this spell is free. Its mana cost. Its ability to sacrifice a land. F R E E. Maybe I'm beginning to see why Zuran Orb has not been reprinted in over 25 years...

  7. Wrenn and Six: Generally I stray from including planeswalkers in EDH/Commander decks. They are difficult to protect and their presence on the battlefield usually is fleeting. Also, the investment of mana resources for the minimal potential return prior to their imminent demise makes including planeswalkers difficult to reconcile. An exception has been made for Wrenn and Six. If we +1 Wrenn and Six, then we return up to one target land card from our graveyard to our hand. Perhaps we return a fetch land, play it, tap it, sacrifice it, search out library for an appropriate land card and put it onto the battlefield under our control. For the investment of , we triggered each landfall ability twice. This is very relevant to our deck. If we -1 Wrenn and Six, then we deal one damage to any target. Pinging a mana dork, a vulnerable, early-turn General/Commander like Rhys the Redeemed, Animar, Soul of Elements or Elenda, the Dusk Rose, or a fellow planeswalker is valuable. Lastly, if we -7 Wrenn and Six, then we get an emblem with "Instant and sorcery cards in our graveyard have retrace," which means we may cast instant and sorcery cards from our graveyard by discarding a land card in addition to paying their other costs. Planeswalker emblems do not leave the battlefield. Additionally, there is the bonus of discarding a land card in order to fulfill the retrace requirement, later prompting the land to be played from our graveyard. We can constantly cast removal spells like Assassin's Trophy, Beast Within and/or Deathsprout. We can continuously ramp by casting spells like Cultivate, Kodama's Reach and/or Realms Uncharted. Wrenn and Six's inclusion into this deck is warranted by its ability to strengthen our "lands matter" theme.

  8. Demonic Tutor: Best tutor in the format. We pay and put any card from our library right into our hand at sorcery speed. Immediate gratification! Imagine pairing a graveyard-residing Demonic Tutor with an emblem from Wrenn and Six...

  9. Eternal Witness: Eternal Witness is a great walking recursion spell: It also provides a body that can chump-block. If Ashaya, Soul of the Wild is under our control, she can trigger our landfall abilities AND we return a card from our graveyard to our hand. All of this for . VALUE!

  10. Bala Ged Recovery  : Here we have another modal double-faced card (MDFC). The front of this card is Regrowth. By adding an additional to its casting cost, we are given the option of flipping this card into Bala Ged Sanctuary   and playing it tapped as a land. The versatility of this card is very appealing to a deck that cares about lands in graveyards and lands entering the battlefield under our control.

  11. Sol Ring: Best artifact in the format. Best card in the format.

  12. Arcane Signet: Second-best artifact in the format. Second-best card in the format.

  13. Mana Crypt: The ramp potential of Mana Crypt is worth the 50/50 risk of taking three points of damage at the beginning of our upkeep (80/20 for me). Its price tag is steep, but under the right set of circumstances, a turn two casting of Lord Windgrace is possible with Mana Crypt on turn one.

And that's the way the news goes. Our list of spells is now complete! We have added 59 cards and have our General/Commander for a total 60 cards. All that remains is the installation of the land base. The MTG Burgeoning community will shape the construction of this land base. Forty land slots have been dedicated for this deck. Which lands do we add? Keep in mind that we MUST leave room for basic lands. We have numerous spells that search for basic lands in our library, so we must take that into account. Leave suggestions for these 40 lands here or in the comments section of Episode #286 (see above) from MTG Burgeoning's YouTube channel.

Thank you in advance!

Here is an MTG Burgeoning YouTube video discussing the installation of Lord Windrgrace's land base:

Here is an MTG Burgeoning YouTube video discussing game-play interactions and revisions to this Lord Windgrace lands matter deck:

Making an appearance on the UP & UP Series, MTG Burgeoning discusses some UPdates & UPgrades to this Lord Windgrace lands-matter EDH deck:

Verdant Catacombs replaces Bloodstained Mire (CHANGE MADE PRIOR TO THIS VIDEO).

Marsh Flats replaces Polluted Delta (CHANGE MADE PRIOR TO THIS VIDEO).

2 Snow-Covered Mountains replace 2 Mountains.

2 Snow-Covered Forests replace 2 Forests.

2 Snow-Covered Swamps replace 2 Swamps.

Field of Ruin replaces Strip Mine.

Agadeem's Awakening   replaces Nylea's Intervention.

Titania, Protector of Argoth replaces Nahiri's Lithoforming.

Tireless Provisioner replaces Springbloom Druid.

Wrenn and Seven replaces Oracle of Mul Daya.

In the following YouTube video, MTG Burgeoning showcases this Lord Windgrace build via a deck tech:

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96% Casual

Competitive

Date added 3 years
Last updated 7 months
Legality

This deck is Commander / EDH legal.

Rarity (main - side)

18 - 0 Mythic Rares

40 - 0 Rares

17 - 0 Uncommons

11 - 0 Commons

Cards 100
Avg. CMC 3.63
Tokens Beast 3/3 G, Beast 4/4 G, Cat Warrior 2/2 G, City's Blessing, Clue, Copy Clone, Elemental 5/3 G, Elemental 5/5 RG, Emblem Wrenn and Realmbreaker, Emblem Wrenn and Seven, Emblem Wrenn and Six, Food, Forest Dryad 1/1 G, Insect 1/1 G, Plant 0/1 G, Treasure, Treefolk */* G w/ Reach, Zombie 2/2 B
Folders MTG Burgeoning's EDH/Commander Decks
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