Forest

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Legality

Format Legality
1v1 Commander Legal
Alchemy Legal
Arena Legal
Block Constructed Legal
Brawl Legal
Canadian Highlander Legal
Casual Legal
Commander / EDH Legal
Commander: Rule 0 Legal
Custom Legal
Duel Commander Legal
Gladiator Legal
Highlander Legal
Historic Legal
Legacy Legal
Leviathan Legal
Limited Legal
Modern Legal
Oathbreaker Legal
Oldschool 93/94 Legal
Pauper Legal
Pauper Duel Commander Legal
Pauper EDH Legal
Pioneer Legal
Pre-release Legal
Premodern Legal
Quest Magic Legal
Standard Legal
Tiny Leaders Legal
Unformat Legal
Vintage Legal

Forest

Basic Land — Forest

: Add .

Catpocolypse on The Island Awakened

20 hours ago

@Profet93 After a bit of thinking, what are your thoughts on cuts for your suggestions?

-1 Jaheira's Respite +1 Greater Good

-1 Colossal Majesty +1 Sylvan Library

-1 World Shaper +1 Abundance

-1 Forest +1 Yavimaya Hollow

Interested on your thoughts about this, especially the possible World Shaper cut.

thesilentpyro on Casual Golgari Food

3 weeks ago

Remove:
4x Mortality Spear
2x Forest

Add:
1x Academy Manufactor
3x Binding the Old Gods
2x Boseiju, Who Endures

Also, manabase updated to reflect reality a little better.


I hate removing instants, but having crucial removal spells that can be found with Trail of Crumbs is important. It might be better to keep a pair of Mortality Spear in or go to 4x Wicked Wolf and replace the other three with Caustic Caterpillar or Green Slime, but testing will tell.

9-lives on Urzatron and Filter lands vs …

1 month ago

I'm wondering if Lotus Field combo works better or worse than using Urzatron with filter lands? Here's my manabase with Urzatron:

28 cards total

Here's the minimum manabase and cards to make Lotus Fields work:

36 cards total

Also, I can use filter lands themselves to make more colored mana. Urzatron with filter is even better. Lotus Fields requires that they are untapped artificially, which seems to giv the urzatron an advantage.

legendofa on Dominaria United Draft 1

1 month ago

Welcome to the club, DianeB!

My first question is, which format or formats are you most interested in? Since you say you're still new, I'll give a quick rundown of the biggest ones; feel free to skip over any you already know about. More general deckbuilding tips are at the end.


To start close to where you are now, Standard format uses only cards from the last several sets. Right now, the Standard-legal sets are Dominaria United, Streets of New Capenna, Kamigawa: Neon Dynasty, Innistrad: Crimson Vow, and Innistrad: Midnight Hunt. Every year, the oldest sets leave Standard and new sets are introduced, so the decks change regularly. Deck construction is minimum 60 cards, with no more than 4 copies of any card (other than the basic lands Plains, Island, Swamp, Mountain, and Forest.) There's also a 15-card sideboard you can use to modify your deck for a better matchup between games in a best-of-3 match. Entry costs for a tournament-level Standard deck are usually a few hundred dollars.

Commander, also known as EDH, is possibly the most popular official format right now, so it's easy to find a game. In Commander, the deck is exactly 100 cards. One of those cards is a Legendary Creature that's the "commander" of the deck, and has several special rules associated with it. You can't include any cards with a mana symbol that doesn't appear in the commander's mana cost or text box. For example, if you choose Tori D'Avenant, Fury Rider as your commander, you can't use any cards with , , or symbols. You also can't use more than one copy of any card other than basic lands; they all need to have different names. Commander has a lot of freedom in deckbuilding, can be done on any budget, and is very open to customizing and self-expression. It's typically a multiplayer format, played in four-person matches, but most people tend to be willing to go one-on-one as well.

I'm going to group Pioneer, Modern, Legacy, and Vintage together, as they're a little harder to get into. They use the same 60-card minimum, 4-copy maximum, 15-card sideboard deckbuilding rules as Standard, but they all have much larger card pools than Standard. These formats are "eternal," which means that they don't gain and lose sets like Standard. Pioneer allows every set released since Return to Ravnica (in 2012), Modern has every set from 8th Edition forward (released in 2003), and Legacy and Vintage both allow almost every card in the game. Tournament-level deck costs range from several hundred dollars in Pioneer to tens of thousands of dollars on Vintage.

Finally, there's Casual. Play with what you have, and have fun doing it. No tournaments, no big-money decks, just a group of players at a table trying to outmatch each other.


On to the general deckbuilding tips. First, try to keep your deck as consistent as possible. This is done by sticking to the minimum number of cards allowed in your deck, usually 60, and including as many copies of your key cards as you can. As an example, if you're building a deck with a focus on instants and sorceries, you might want to include four copies each of Haughty Djinn, Fires of Victory, and Impulse. This will give you the best chance to draw the cards you need.

Second is the idea of the "mana curve," which you can see as a bar graph on this page. There's a lot of math that goes into the mana curve, but the general idea is to maximize your ability to play appropriate cards at every point in the game. Very fast, aggressive decks have a very tight mana curve, and might not include any cards that cost more than two mana. More defensive decks that want to control a longer game usually go higher. Broadly speaking, decks with a tighter mana curve are strongest in the early game and try to win quickly, while decks with a wider mana curve try to prevent fast wins and play a longer game.

Related to the above is land count and balancing. Many new players don't include enough lands, thinking that they aren't really interesting and don't do the "fun stuff" of the deck. This is kind of like leaving dead batteries in a flashlight because it's not the "useful" part. Lands and mana are what make the deck go, and skimping on them results in an unreliable deck, where you can't do the "fun" stuff because you can't pay for it. In this deck, 25 lands seems about right. The faster, tight-mana-curve decks can get away with fewer lands. Most decks want around 40% to be mana sources like lands.

There are some more points, especially about choosing color and strategy, but this response has gone on long enough. This forum is usually pretty welcoming of questions and is very knowledgeable, so please ask. And above all, have fun!

estoner on I solved mana screw and …

2 months ago

I heard of that variant as well. They had the right idea, but didn't realize that when they remove the variance of drawing spells versus lands, that variance has to be relocated somewhere else to prevent breaking the game. Adding colorless lands to randomly "brick" your manabase achieves this, and Wastes are not only perfect because they lack basic land types and don't affect domain, they're already a part of the game.

From a lore standpoint, why are lands in your "library" to begin with? And conceptually, a player should have to build up from Wastes to something like a Tropical Island or a