Cyclonic Rift

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Legality

Format Legality
1v1 Commander Legal
Block Constructed Legal
Canadian Highlander Legal
Casual Legal
Commander / EDH Legal
Commander: Rule 0 Legal
Custom Legal
Duel Commander Legal
Highlander Legal
Legacy Legal
Leviathan Legal
Limited Legal
Modern Legal
Oathbreaker Legal
Pioneer Legal
Tiny Leaders Legal
Vintage Legal

Cyclonic Rift

Instant

Return target nonland permanent you don't control to its owner's hand.

Overload (You may cast this spell for its overload cost. If you do, change its text by replacing all instances of "target" with "each.")

hootsnag on Hurkyl, Tempo Master Wizard

1 week ago

Portent, Crawlspace, Web of Inertia, Dream Tides, War Tax, Glacial Chasm, Monastery Siege, Cryptic Command, Extract, Portcullis, Dissipation Field, Overburden, Archmage Ascension, Frozen Aether, Reins of Power, Rapid Hybridization, Siren's Call, Cyclonic Rift, Mission Briefing, Reality Shift, and Resculpt are just a few you could potentially use. You can very easily go creatureless if you want to. You just have to lean on different win conditions and use cards like Ward of Bones /etc.

Coward_Token on Brother's War Spoilers

4 weeks ago

Continuing my trend of complaining about color bleeding, I don't like that Emergency Weld is continuing Fortuitous Find's legacy of giving black (noncreature non-Vehicle) artifact recursion

I dislike Disciple of Caelus Nin too, because it's a needlessly harsh punishment for using Teferi's Protection, one of the few ways for go-wide decks to survive Cyclonic Rift.

Gleeock on Ruric Thar Anti control

1 month ago

Nice, I make a bunch of anti-control decks. My Atla deck is extremely focused on bringing out punishers & just rolling along regardless of countermagic or most stax (it doesn't care much about card draw & abilities aren't stopped as often as spells). Anyway, Ruric Thar, the Unbowed is pretty much my favorite creature cheat in that deck: Atla with Tobasco Sauce. It is one of the single best punishers of Cyclonic Rift that I have ever played

Ardees on Gates? Nine Fingers Keene Competitive

1 month ago

If you are aiming at 'competitive' in the technical sense of the term (as in 'cEDH' or 'competitive EDH'), like the title seems to suggest, I see many staples missing that unfortunately make the deck quite far from being competitive.

Artifacts: you should be running at least Mox Diamond, Chrome Mox, Mana Crypt, Sol Ring, Arcane Signet, Mana Vault, Jeweled Lotus, maybe even Grim Monolith and Lion's Eye Diamond.,

Tutors: you are missing Vampiric Tutor, Imperial Seal, and Worldly Tutor and Green Sun's Zenith if you run any combo, win, or strategy whatsoever based on creatures. You could also add Wishclaw Talisman and Solve the Equation, and, although not a tutor, Peer into the Abyss, which works quite nicely with Thought Vessel.

Lands: any competitive deck plays true duals, namely Underground Sea, Bayou, and Tropical Island. Same for shocklands and at least 6-7 fetchlands in a 3-color deck like this one. You could also consider lower the number of lands, depending on whether or not you want to keep the Gate strategy

Protection: any competitive deck that plays blue automatically plays top-end counterspells, namely Swan Song, Arcane Denial, Force of Will, Force of Negation, Pact of Negation, Fierce Guardianship, Mental Misstep, An Offer You Can't Refuse, and Flusterstorm. You are also missing key cards like Cyclonic Rift or Chain of Vapor. Needless to say, ideally a competitive deck playing blue also plays Timetwister: not a counterspell but a must card (yeah, the price is another topic of conversation).

Creatures: I understand the Gate theme but you are missing some high-value creature cards in here, most notably Dauthi Voidwalker, Malevolent Hermit  Flip, Lotus Cobra, Azusa, Lost but Seeking, Tatyova, Benthic Druid, Ramunap Excavator, Dryad of the Ilysian Grove, Oracle of Mul Daya, Elvish Reclaimer - to name a few. Much depends on the strategy of your deck, although don't let keywords aligned with your strategy (e.g. 'Gate') fool you into thinking some cards are good for that.

Enchantments: a few staples in the current competitive meta: Rhystic Study, Mystic Remora, Sylvan Library, Burgeoning, Exploration, maybe Abundance and Necropotence

Removals: you could most definitely swap some of your removals for something better and more competitive, such as Force of Vigor, Nature's Claim, Abrupt Decay, Assassin's Trophy, and more.

Now, I totally understand there is a budget situation going on with upgrading to competitive MtG (spoiler alert: MtG is a pay-to-win type of game, research confirms), but generally the term 'competitive' sticks to decks that, to the very least, include most if not all cards mentioned above - without mentioning the fact that any competitive deck needs running at least one winning combo. At this stage, your level is more looking towards casual. This isn't to criticize you or anything of course, pretty interesting build, just not really a competitive deck in its strict sense.

If you want to try the competitive experience, my suggestion is to proxy cards by printing them online - this should cost around 10 bucks on colored and good quality paper, and effectively save you more than 7k worth of cards.

Guerric on [Primer] Helming the Host of Heaven *Update*

1 month ago
We're going to call this game a win, though I didn't see the illegal play at the time that made me think that I "lost" it! I was playing against a nasty Queza, Augur of Agonies combo deck, a Veyran, Voice of Duality deck and a Lathril, Blade of the Elves deck. I took a lot of hate and lost a lot of pieces that I fielded, but I was careful not to dump my hand too quickly, and kept my resources strong by attacking every turn with goood old Segovian Angel equipped with Sword of Hearth and Home and Rogue's Gloves, making sure I had no shortage of ramp and cards. Eventually my opponents were exhausted and I dumped a large quantity of angels on the battlefield in a single turn, including Linvala, Keeper of Silence. I had lethal against my remaining opponents, but I thought the Queza player had been able to pull out a game winning combo. This would have required him to cycle Sanctum Plowbeast however, and Linvala should have shut that off since plowbeast is a creature. As such, we'll call this one a win! I think this game illustrates once again the power of Linvala, but also is a reminder that you don't want to commit too many resources before you're ready, and that when getting a lot of hate you can just build up resources for the right time and overwhelm them. Getting this pacing right is how once moves from being a noob at this deck to a pro.
For the first time this summer I got to play against this deck, as a friend I met a teacher's conference piloted it 1v1 against my own best deck, which is my Inalla, Archmage Ritualist combo deck. Needless to say, I learned from this game that this deck is easily piloted well by someone that isn't me but is a good player, and once again that is a monster deck in 1v1. Despite having lots of premium control pieces in my toolbelt including Cyclonic Rift (which I tutored and played), counterspells, removal pieces, and lots of game-winning, synergistic combos, I just wasn't able to keep up with Giada. Linvala, Keeper of Silence made my life miserable until I erased it with a Toxic Deluge, though the life loss hurt. She still came back quickly even from that and finished me off. It was good to see my deck piloted expertly by someone else, and perform well against my most competitive deck.
This game was short and a bit of a sequel to the previous game. I once again was piloting my Inalla deck against a friend who was playing Giada, though this time it was a four player game. The Giada deck worked well, and was the major target at the game table. Unfortunately for them this meant they ignored me, and I combo'ed off out of nowhere well before they were expecting it. As such, it was a loss for Giada, but the deck worked the way it was supposed to even in another player's hand, even if the threat assessment of all three of my opponents did not work as well.
This was the truly epic win that I've been waiting for since I built this deck, and my favorite game with it to date. Not only did I finish the game with 150 life (thanks to Bishop of Wings, Soul's Attendant, and especially Righteous Valkyrie), but I formed Brisela, Voice of Nightmares  Meld  Meld not once, but twice, and brought Emeria, The Sky Ruin fully online. My opponents were playing my own decks, which are good, including my super fast Yuriko, the Tiger's Shadow deck, but not even Yuriko could keep up with my lifegain, which left my opponents in quite the dilemma as they tried to figure out which threats to do with. Brisela fell he first time to a Dokuchi Silencer, but I was able to kill the Yuriko player before he could repeat the act, and I brought Bruna back with Emeria and Gisela back with Karmic Guide, and there was nothing my remaining opponent could do to stop me. I think this game was an illustration of just how good this deck can be when performing at its ceiling.

Dragaan on The One Drop Zoo

1 month ago

also unsure why Guttural Response? Is being able to cast it off a basic mountain (and I guess protection from something like an overloaded Cyclonic Rift or an Aetherspouts..) worth using it over Veil of Summer?

enpc on Question for the CEDH community

1 month ago

Giving this some additional thought (especially since I'm not having to type on my phone):

For Savage Summoning in a cEDH setting, the most powerful part of the card is that you can give a creature spell flash. My reasoning for this is because if you're casting a big creature in cEDH, generally you're going for big impact cards. But (usually) the kinds of decks which want to cast big creatures are either stax effects or control decks who are casting soemthing like Nezahal, Primal Tide. In the case of control decks playing Nez, it's already uncounterable and, well, you're a cotrol deck. You're already packed with counterspells so why would you dilute your general control with something that only protects your stuff and only as you play it. The window of value is so low here.

And for the other deck type that you play big creatures with being stax, your objective is to lock the game down early. Every turn you let slip is a turn that your deck is not doing its thing. So You're not going to want to wait until you can play something big and then flash it in uncounterably. By the time you're playing something big you should already have a board lock (unless you've either done something wrong or were unable to achieve a proper lock). And at that point there shouldn't be much that your opponents can do about your incoming high impact card anyway. So at this point the card basically becomes a "this only really adds value if I'm getting my arse kicked but want to stick that one big creature" which is not what you want to be wasting card slots on.

If you're after flash effects, at least Scout's Warning at worst cantrips, but Savage Summoning just isn't worth it unless you're talking very niche scenarios, which makes it not worth it.

As for Seedtime, as I mentioned the card is basically only playable if your opponent is casting blue spells (i.e. countermagic). This means that you're either A) responding to countermagic with your own countermagic, which in this case you may as well just play conditionless extra turn spells (as you're running blue), or B) your main plan has just been stopped. This means that more often than not, you don't have much else to do and so it will untap your lands, draw you a card and let you play a land (kind of like a vintage turn 1/2 Time Walk). That's not terrible, but the question is: could the card be doing more to aid your main strategy? Imagine if you had a wheel in hand instead, to refill your hand. Would this be more valuable than an extra turn?

The strength of card comes from being able to respond to something like a Cyclonic Rift (especially if you're a very permanent heavy deck) or if you can generate a lot of value in a given non-win turn (@davidsays1 I did notice that you have a Selvala, Explorer Returned deck which runs it - this is probably one of the better use cases for the card due to the value that Selvala can generate you). And sure, responding to an someone Brainstorming at your EOT is funny, but it's still pretty corner case.

But I would say that there are a myriad of blue extra turn spells, however most blue decks don't both running them unless it's part of the deck's strategy to begin will. So that should help paint a bit of a picture about why Seedtime doesn't really see play.

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