Forcefield

Legality

Format Legality
Pre-release Legal
Noble Legal
Leviathan Legal
Tiny Leaders Legal
Magic Duels Legal
Vintage Legal
Casual Legal
Vanguard Legal
Legacy Legal
Archenemy Legal
Planechase Legal
1v1 Commander Legal
Duel Commander Legal
Unformat Legal
Pauper Legal
Commander / EDH Legal

Printings View all

Set Rarity
Masters Edition (MED) Common
Unlimited Edition (2ED) Rare
Collector's Edition (CED) Rare
International Collector's Edition (CEI) Rare
Limited Edition Beta (LEB) Rare
Limited Edition Alpha (LEA) Rare

Combos Browse all

Forcefield

Artifact

: The next time an unblocked creature of your choice would deal combat damage to you this turn, prevent all but 1 of that damage.

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Forcefield Discussion

EricC7 on Endless Red Tape: GAAIV EDH (100% COMPETITIVE)

1 week ago

Have you thought about running the card Forcefield?

precociousapprentice on Queen Marchesa: Politics, Aikido, and Control

3 weeks ago

Awesome. Thanks for the amazing game reports. Opponnents getting salty is why I think that the deck belongs in a large and rotating meta. Familiarity breeds contempt. Getting beat this way sometimes is fun. Getting beat just about every game is not fun.

As for possible early commander aggression, I would suggest the Vow cycle. I prefer Vow of Malice, since giving them intimidate when they can't attack you is great, but giving them first strike with Vow of Lightning, or vigilance with Vow of Duty, since both can be used against you by enhancing their ability to block, is not as great. You could also consider Darksteel Mutation, even though it makes part of their offense ineffective for use against your opponents. Any of these are pretty good, and could replace or be added to Swords to Plowshares, Path to Exile, etc... as spot removal. I have tried all of these, but my meta did not have super fast voltron decks, and I wanted to have the versatility of the spot removal that I currently use for taking out strong utility creatures or commanders who have an effect on the game that is not related to combat. I will continue to think about the super fast voltron decks. Usually my Maze of Ith, Kor Haven, Spires of Orazca, Delaying Shield, Solitary Confinement, Forcefield, Delirium, Backlash, Fog suite, spot removal suite, Threaten effect suite, Rattlesnake suite, and suite of cards to encourage them to attack elsewhere all keep my losses to voltron under control. That being said, the only real contenders in that category in my meta have been Omnath, Locus of Mana and Gisela, Blade of Goldnight, and they are not super fast.

I personally love the interaction of Selfless Squire with another Fog. They feel safe after the Selfless Squire has already hit the board, and they swing at you with everything. Fog, they are tapped, and you can swing for more than they did. You can sometimes bait people into overcommitting by dropping Selfless Squire to prevent even a modest amount of damage when holding another Fog. The usual game plan for someone who you think holds a Fog but doesn't have much to retaliate with is to attack into them. They need to be forced to play it, then you alpha-strike. That is what most people do against this deck when they get to know it. They force the Fog, then alpha-strike. I can often bait them into overcommitting by dropping the Selfless Squire against a moderate attack. Usually this makes a 10/10 Squire or more. When they see that big beater and what they think was a wasted Fog, they decide to take me out before that Squire can get a chance to get bigger. They figure that they can withstand that 10+ damage, even if I survive, so they swing with everything trying to take me out. Then I drop a Batwing Brume or something, survive, and they are tapped out. I get to swing into them for sometimes more than 40. Crazy turnaround.

Hajalak1 on MAKE NEKUSAR TIER 2!!!!!!!!!

3 weeks ago

If I may make a recommendation, I'd nix cards like Forcefield and swap them for defensive options like AEtherize or Illusionist's Gambit

precociousapprentice on Konda's Yojimbo Learns Aikido

1 month ago

Love the deck. I am really partial to this style of play. It acknowledges that there are multiple players, and not all are your enemy at any specific point, especially if you play correctly. +1.

For some additional card ideas, you could check out my Queen Marchesa: Politics, Aikido, and Control deck. I have tried a lot of the cards in your list. In white, I would suggest that you consider Mana Tithe and Lapse of Certainty. Counterspells in white can really come out of nowhere. It goes well with Dawn Charm and Teferi's Protection . Also, it is worthwhile to consider cards like Silence, Abeyance, and Orim's Chant. They can be very powerful control elements that can allow you to dictate how turns play out. I would also consider Sun Droplet. It is a low CMC artifact that comes down early, and in multiplayer, it can buffer a lot of early attacks, even if it just decreases the total damage done without eliminating it. If you have the funds, Forcefield fits this category as well. When people are deciding between a decreased effect attack onn you versus a full effect attack on someone else, they frequently attack elsewhere. This is basically a 2 for 1 for you. And finally, check out Worship. It combines really well with your Near-Death Experience for a much easier to accomplish wincon and Pillow Fort all wrapped up in one.

Again, love the deck, and I can't wait to see where you take it. I may have to try out a mono-White Aikido as well. This looks great. I just might go with Michiko Konda, Truth Seeker instead.

precociousapprentice on Queen Marchesa: Politics, Aikido, and Control

1 month ago

Actually, you just made up my mind. I got tired of waiting to find one to trade, knowing that was likely impossible. I ordered a Forcefield. About time.

precociousapprentice on Queen Marchesa: Politics, Aikido, and Control

1 month ago

Suns_Champion, thanks for the upvote and the very kind words. I appreciate it. Here are my initial answers to your questions. I may have other answers as I think more about your questions, but these are my answers based on what I have seen so far.

First, the deck is fun, and if you already win most games, this deck will probably not change that, unless you are seriously cutthroat already. It basically just evens the power of most decks until the last round or two, and plays as a 75% deck at every table I have found it. I probably wins more than that, but this is because I am the most experienced and obsessed player in my normal meta (it has seen 2 different metas so far, due to a move) and when I show up at random tables, no one really expects it. It has become more popular to play Queen Marchesa, but not enough to be that big of a deal. I would love people to build it and give me feed back on how it does at more tables than I can reach. Even with the concerns about inexperience in your meta, it can withstand more hate than it seems, and while the intention is to ride below the radar, even if it doesn't, it can still often hang. If they waste resources on your death touchers, even the Queen, something else will get them. The Queen and her deathtouch army definitely add to the strategy, but the deck runs fine if they are taken out. Something gets them in the end.

Second, as for Swiftfoot Boots and Lightning Greaves, I didn't include them for two reasons. First, I needed the slots. It is a really tight list. Second, removing the Queen is less of a problem than you think. Bring her back out and you are the Monarch again. This provides some disincentive to take her out, at least for the guy who is currently or soon will be the Monarch. She is fairly inexpensive with a CMC of , so this can happen a few times before it gets truly out of hand. For a minor third reason, you only get half of the benefit of those cards when playing with Queen Marchesa, since she already has haste. I found better uses for those slots.

Third, Price of Progress, Anathemancer, and Acidic Soil are all just cards with a low CMC and a high potential damage for the average meta. Commander is notorious for non-basics. If this is not worth it in your meta, think about a resource, situation, or game characteristic that is very common in your meta, and hit them for that. If a bajillion creatures are often on the board, try mainboarding Insurrection, Incite Rebellion, and Stronghold Discipline. If people draw a ton of cards, try Underworld Dreams and Sudden Impact. Go after common game states and the usual overreach for your meta. Take advantage of the way that players build their decks to work. Use their strategy to take them down. Become one with their deck, let their power become yours. There are many ways to do this, I have just seen that excessive lands, especially nonbasic lands, can be a source of power for my offense, and Price of Progress and Anathemancer are usually just really efficient bombs.

Fourth, there have been a few times I have really wanted Arcane Lighthouse. It is pretty amazing. This has been especially true against really aggressive decks, especially voltron decks, since Greaves/Boots are standard issue for voltron. That is definitely a consideration, and probably could be fit in if shroud/hexproof are a problem.

Fifth, Scavenger Grounds is a great card, and if graveyard is a serious threat in your meta, it is a good include. I find that with Bojuka Bog, Shred Memory, and Rakdos Charm, I am often covered well enough. If it got further out of hand with the graveyard shenanigans, I would possibly include Scavenger Grounds, or maybe Rest in Peace.

Sixth, Pacification Array is pretty weak. It occasionally allows for something surprising, since it is often forgotten about, and is otherwise pretty cheap. It probably gets played from my hand as a sorcery speed tap one creature or artifact card for immediate advantage more than any other way, but it does act as a decent Kor Haven replacement with some frequency. Think of it like surprise tempo, defense, and politics all wrapped up in a relatively cheap package. I like how flexible it is, being used for both offensive and defensive uses, as well as politically by defending other players (rare) or opening a line of attack against a common opponent (more frequent) so that I can encourage that attack to point away from me. It is honestly still in there because I have just not taken it out again, since it has come out before, but you may be overlooking it's subtle power. It will get replaced with Forcefield when I can get one. With a deck as pimped as I have made this, Forcefield kind of needs to be in there. It will be some day. For someone else's deck, it could be just about anything.

Thanks again for the kind words. I look forward to seeing your version when you make it. It really is a ton of fun to play, and never disappoints, even when it loses.

zjepsen on Sente: The Politics and Metaphor of Stones

1 month ago

Hello, I like the work you've put into this. Sen Triplets has always been a card I wanted to play, but the response from my group has been poor. No one likes having their hand exposed and no one likes having someone else play their cards.

This seems to be the general response to Sen Triplets, and is something I'd be curious to get your thoughts on. If your intent is to create a shared sense of understanding in exposing one player's hand and "helping" to play their spells, you run the risk of still, every game, being the initial target and likely archenemy.

Assume the game begins before the first turn. While shuffling and cutting decks, your opponents are assessing each commander.

What does Sen Triplets represent that Queen Marchesa does not? Heavier control and combo colors! Both of these things additionally contribute to the risk you assume in becoming the target while playing this general.

The rational response in any situation involving playing against Sen Triplets is to kill the Sen Triplets player!

If we accept the fact that we are going to be pursued aggressively each and every game we play, we have several options:

  1. Go for an extreme pillow fort/rattlesnake strategy.
  2. Go for a heavy, mass removal and control strategy (which goes against some of your defined deck-building goals) or fast combo.
  3. Somehow communicate that you aren't the threat you seem to be, which is what I'd like to do.

To that end, the list I am brainstorming will be a mix of pillowfort/rattlesnake cards, with a dash of group hug effects, emphasizing cards (some already in your Marchesa list) that communicate how little of a threat I actually am. And that's going to be a challenge! Marchesa is awesome, but no one sees her on the other side of the table and fears a turn 2 reanimated Jin-Gitaxias, Core Augur or Sharuum the Hegemon infinite combo.

I don't ever intend to play Sen Triplets on curve.

Early drops might include Sun Droplet, Wall of Omens, Wall of Denial.

Bitterblossom does a solid Forcefield impression.

Group hug will focus on draw specifically (after all, we aren't in green). My favorite group hug deck mitigates the empowering-the-person-to-your-left effect by playing a sprinkle of chaos (please see Zedruu, the Greatest of all Time here: http://www.mtgsalvation.com/forums/the-game/commander-edh/multiplayer-commander-decklists/598449-zedruu-the-greatest-of-all-time; it really is awesome, and the deck is a result of its creator's diligent effort and love, and it stands apart from most Zedruu lists).

Enabling opponents just the right amount will be hard to achieve, but it's a direction I'd like to explore. Also, seriously, who will expect Sen Triplets group hug?

Regarding chaos, Knowledge Pool would be on theme here.

Ultimately, like Marchesa, if you can be one of two players remaining, with the appropriate protection to maintain a board position where any move your opponent makes toward you is an inherently in your favor, you can utilize key cards from their hand (Sen Triplets), deck (Praetor's Grasp, Acquire, Bribery, Knowledge Exploitation) and graveyard (Memory Plunder) to finish them off.

If you made it through this ramble, thank you. And thank you for the interesting take on Sen Triplets!

precociousapprentice on Queen Marchesa: Politics, Aikido, and Control

4 months ago

TheWallinator74, thanks for the comment. I tried Crackling Doom. It was good, but the list is tight. It is nice in metas with eldrazi titans, but mine did not have much that way, so it was less good than the other control. I also like to keep power on the table if possible so I can use it myself. Crawlspace is pretty great, but it actually performed worse than more subtle things like Duelist's Heritage. Situationally, it can be great, such as when I have a Maze effect, but otherwise, it was less effective. Norn's Annex has been in and out of the deck since inception, it never pulls it's weight. I have addressed that every time it comes up, but essentially, spending life is something that people are prepared to do. It doesn't change table behavior that much. I have looked at Diaochan, Artful Beauty, and she can be used politically, but a stronger spot removal is usually what I want. I have not playtested her, so she could turn out to be awesome. Honestly, that is not really the type of politics this deck plays. Strangely, negotiation is typically not what you want to do. Avoid the perception of manipulation, stick to giving choices that will likely lead to table behavior that benefits you because it is your opponent's best option as well. Diaochan, Artful Beauty does not do this at all.

Mathas, Fiend Seeker is something that I have had extensive discussions about, here and all over the usual forums. I think he is counter to what this deck wants to do. I want to leave power on the table, using it to create my victory conditions. He wants to control the board by convincing people to use their control the way that you want it, keeping the board clear and safe for Mathas. I can get away with packing less offense and less wincons sheerly by affecting table behavior and leaving power on the battlefield. Mathas needs to carry more offense and wincons, because he eliminates threats from the battlefield. Different play styles, and I don't think that they mix.

Yarataj, I agree with Forcefield being great. I don't have one. I would test it if I did, but I am not sure it is even that much better than what I have. The pillow fort is crazy good at doing what it is intended, and is not obvious until it is played. Affecting table behavior is the name of the game, and you often don't need the most effective cards to make this happen, and sometimes subtle is better. As for Ankle Shanker and Boros Battleshaper, neither fits. Ankle Shanker is more of an expensive combat trick board wipe than anything, and I don't have room or need for that effect. Not enough creatures to take advantage of that, and adding deathtouch to my mostly deathtouch creatures adds nothing. Good in Alesha, less impressive in Queen Marchesa, almost no value added in this build. Boros Battleshaper is a combat trick, but it is very expensive, and is manipulative. This deck focuses on shaping decisions, not as much outright taking them away. There are a few cards that make decisions for other players, but those are basically game enders, like Wrath of Goad ( Disrupt Decorum ). I have avoided blatant manipulation, because I think it will be much less effective. Cards in play should give subtle added value through changing table behavior by encouraging decisions that forward my plan because they also benefit the one making the decision, and blatant manipulation should hit the table and immediately create a huge effect on the game, and then go away. Boros Battleshaper is not subtle, takes time to get full effect, and looks like it will create persistent resentment of my game state in other players. When other players start thinking "Well, this sucks." about my board state, I want it to be because the game has ended. Otherwise, I want them to be thinking, "I can deal with that later, and I might as well use it while I can." It should feel like Group Hug to attack other players and Stax to attack me. Players like to play with group hug, and hate to play with Stax. They usually adjust their play style and decisions accordingly.

Thanks for the comments. I will definitely continue to consider all suggestions, and may change my mind as I come to a better understanding, but these are my initial reactions.

As an insight into how I think, when considering cards, people usually ask themselves, "How will this affect the board state?" That is a good start, but I like a little different approach. I ask, "How will this change how people play? Will they make decisions that are in my favor when I play this? Will they feel a need to go against me when I play it? Do I care about that?" This makes certain cards much more powerful than they seem, because the board state is less important in multiplayer than how people choose to play. This is what 1v1 players complain about multiplayer games, and rant about "politics" and the negative effect on the game. I want to use that. Not the manipulation, not the negotiation, but the flow of the game and the decisions that people make about how they use their cards. This deck is about affecting that element of the game. I could choose better cards for affecting the board, but these cards are the best for changing decisions about how people should play their cards. Can it be played around? Yes. Does it get played around very often. Absolutely not. That is why it is so fun.

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