Council's Judgment

Council's Judgment

Sorcery

Will of the council — Starting with you, each player votes for a nonland permanent you don't control. Exile each permanent with the most votes or tied for most votes.

Latest Decks as Commander

Council's Judgment Discussion

StopShot on Should I not run Negan, …

3 weeks ago

Hello, I don't watch the Walking Dead and I honestly think the Secret Lair: Walking Dead product is a very bad decision on Wizard's part. That being said, one of the cards being released provides a silver bullet to a problem I often encounter in certain games.

Card: Negan, The Cold-Blooded

I'm not planning to make him my commander, but I want to use him in the 99, because he is practically the best removal spell ever made when dealing with creatures that have both hexproof and indestructible.

Seriously, the next best cards are Council's Judgment, Crackling Doom Soul Shatter, Mythos of Snapdax, Slaughter the Strong, etc. These cards all have conditions where they can fail to remove the creature I want gone, but Negan has none of those same problems making him the most effective piece of spot removal printed to this date, effectively costing only 4 mana given the treasure token.

I know I could just run other sure-fire answers like Descend upon the Sinful or Apocalypse instead, but those cards can massively hurt my side of the table too which makes them not worth running and they can also make the rest of the table unhappy with me for playing exile-wipes.

Another thing to note is that Negan is a creature which means I can make him uncounterable with a Cavern of Souls rather than Boseiju, Who Shelters All, a land that's much more inflexible to play with than Cavern. I can also reanimate his effect too with Volrath's Stronghold and other reanimation effects which would make him so good at keeping commanders with hexproof and indestructible repeatedly in check unlike a lot of the other one-time use instants and sorceries I have available.

The only issue is I think most play-groups will tell me that their play group will have this card banned given all the controversy surrounding it which is a shame. My question is, do you think its worth the trouble acquiring this card? If I'm going to spend a lot of money to buy a single only for most people to tell me I can't play it then I don't want to spend that kind of money, but for now I'm unsure. Would you advise for or against buying it? Thanks!

Femme_Fatale on Box Topper Code?

1 month ago

The Box Toppers are just variations of the initial artwork, they are not their own set. They have the same TLA has Double Masters does and thus get placed in the Double Masters set.

[[Council's Judgment (2XM:336)]]

Council's Judgment

Please read up on my artwork variations and promo styles thread in the site updates forum for more information.

OldTrafford25 on Box Topper Code?

1 month ago

Hello, I am trying to display the art to Council's Judgment's Box Topper in my decklist - neither (000) nor (336) is working. I'm wondering if Box Toppers have a specific code, or if it hasn't been added quite yet. Thanks!

StopShot on Counteracting large hexproof creatures.

1 month ago

The subject of this thread revolves around dealing with and counteracting against the commanders: Uril, the Miststalker, Sigarda, Host of Herons, Dragonlord Ojutai, Lazav, Dimir Mastermind, Thrun, the Last Troll as well as commanders that consistently or typically give themselves hexproof through various equipments/auras.

While it may not be the most prevalent strategy these types of commanders can be annoying to deal with. I'd like to create a discussion on what are the best ways to deal with these commanders. Given how niche these commanders can be, running cards that exclusively dedicate themselves to their removal may be detrimental to draw into when playing a game where none of your opponents run them. Therefore cards that can both combat massive hexproof creatures as well as still being useful to have if none of your opponents are playing with big hexproof creatures should be taken into consideration when deciding what is the "best" or "most practical" solution to combating hexproof strategies.

The first cards that come to mind are Arcane Lighthouse, Detection Tower, Bonds of Mortality, Shadowspear and Glaring Spotlight. These cards entirely dedicate themselves to combating hexproof strategies, and while this may be a detriment when used against non-hexproof strategies, these cards do lend themselves some extra utility. Arcane Lighthouse and Detection Tower can be seeded into your manabase so at worst they're just a Wastes however they can be more inefficient in comparison. Given that both are lands, tapping them costs you an extra mana resource effectively making their abilities cost to activate. Not only that, but they have no effect at stripping indestructible which can be a common keyboard which may be used alongside most hexproof strategies. Cards like Bonds of Mortality and Shadowspear cost only one to activate and they can bypass indestructible, however given they're not lands you have to dedicate a nonland slot in your deck to accommodate either of them which means taking out a card that may better synergize with your deck's main strategy in their place. They also lend themselves targets for counter spells and given hexproof decks contain white and/or green, artifact/enchantment removal will pose a high potential risk. This is all not to mention you still need to provide a removal spell in tandem with these cards in order to remove the threat.

Another solution is board wipes. Cards such as Wrath of God, Damnation, Day of Judgment, Supreme Verdict, Blasphemous Act, etc. Mass creature removal is incredibly strong given that its always relevant in most metas making it a highly flexible solution that isn't too narrow to rely upon. It's biggest drawback however is if the massive hexproof creature that needs to be dealt with has indestructible, totem armor or Gift of Immortality. Even a card such as Toxic Deluge can be a risk as you may have to pay a huge amount of life if the creature is incredibly big. Cyclonic Rift is another effective card. One thing to note about boardwipes are they affect the whole table which makes them also more likelier to be countered than by effects that impact a single individual.

A more narrow solution would be through damage prevention effects such as Story Circle, Forcefield, Runed Halo, Rune of Protection: White, etc. Given each card never "targets" they can be used to infinitely "Fog" a problem creature that you can't put up with. These effects are more narrow than boardwipes but broader than hexproof removal. Cards like these still run into problems with artifact/enchantment removal and they don't run enticing side effects such as drawing a card upon entering the battlefield like Bonds of Mortality or giving a creature lifelink and trample like Shadowspear, however you won't need to exhaust your removal spells to keep the large creature(s) either. In more broader metas such as combo, stax and prison, these effects may not be as useful however. More broader variants of these protection cards exist as Ensnaring Bridge, Divine Presence, Peacekeeper and Meekstone though these cards may make multiple opponents unhappy enough to remove them than the more narrower options.

The last effect used to combat large hexproof creatures is sacrifice effects such as: Fleshbag Marauder, Innocent Blood, Vona's Hunger, Liliana's Triumph, Doomfall etc. These effects can bypass not only hexproof but also indestructible, regenerate and totem armor. Their drawback lies in if the player with the large hexproof creature has any other creatures to sacrifice in their place. Because of this caveat this effect isn't too strong unless ran in multiples which can be difficult to commit to in a 100-card format. Instead selective sacrifice effects may be the best way to devote to this solution with cards like: Crackling Doom, Soul Shatter, Slaughter the Strong, Council's Judgment, Renounce the Guilds and Wing Shards. While these cards won't always guarantee the large hexproof creature will be removed, they provide a stronger case than not compared to most traditional sacrifice removal.

Lastly there are counter spells to remove hexproof creatures. While they may be the best all purpose solution they can be rendered ineffective if a Cavern of Souls or some other can not be countered effect is in place. With exception to Withering Boon, the biggest downside to counter spells are they are entirely exclusive to blue meaning other color combinations without blue do not have this option available.

Which method do you rely on to stop massive hexproof creatures? Is there a card or solution set not listed here that you use? If you happen to play EDH decks with big massive hexproof creatures, which effects annoy/counter you the most?

Peoni on I wanna play your stuff too

1 month ago

2 cards I think you should really consider running: Head Games and Zur's Weirding.

You should also consider running more mana rocks like Sol Ring, Arcane Signet, and Fellwar Stone. Then probably look to swap out your lands that come in tapped with either basics or other lands that don't come in tapped that fit into your budget.

Next I would advise you to think about what you want your deck to do. I feel like a lot of the cards in this list don't necessarily fit the overall strategy and lack synergy with other parts of your deck. For example, why are you running cards like Shark Typhoon, Council's Judgment, Omniscience, and Leyline of Anticipation? How do they fit into your commander's strategy? Also think about cards that you could improve on. I can tell you want to incorporate some sort of stax/pillowforty element into your deck with cards like Lawmage's Binding and Gwafa Hazid, Profiteer, but there are better cards we could swap these out for like Ghostly Prison to complement your Propaganda and Crawlspace to limit the amount of hitters coming at you. Looking at your current list it feels like you want to make this into a deck that wins and doesn't care about the fun of others (after all you're playing Sen Triplets), so look to improve your existing picks and ask yourself what your cards do to further your strategy.

Finally, take out Deafening Silence and Meddling Mage. The latter hurts what you're trying to do a lot. You'll only be able to use people's hands to a limited degree and it just slows the game down a lot in general without helping you win. The former just doesn't do enough when you could just cast their threatening spell yourself to get rid of it.

Good luck with this deck! I hope it comes out to your liking and I hope I was of some assistance. :^)

Gidgetimer on Thunderbreak regent and Frogify and …

1 month ago

Auras target as spells as part of their card sub-type. This means that Thunderbreak Regent will trigger when an opponent casts an aura targeting one of your dragons.

It isn't just because you are specifying a creature to be affected though. If an aura enters the battlefield without being cast (usually from something like Genesis Wave or Flicker of Fate) it is attached to a legal permanent without targeting. There are also cards that just straight up never target despite needing a thing to affect. Cards like Council's Judgment or Brudiclad, Telchor Engineer's copy ability.

Nemesis on Cube additions

2 months ago

enpc on The Crown Scourge

4 months ago

Comparing modern bogles to commander voltron is comparing apples and oranges. And notbody said that hexproof isn't great for voltron commanders.

Stright up, yes, counterspells are amazing. there are so many zero and one CMC protection counterspells to keep your commander alive that it's really not hard to hold up some removal while progressing your board state. And for a strategy like voltron, you need to keep pressure on your opponents. Blue does this much better than red does.

In addition to that, generally the best voltron strategies lean into equipment rather than auras due to the fragility of auras. And leveraging something like a Sigarda's Aid + Colossus Hammer is really all you need for Rafiq.

Not to mention, hexproof is not the be-all and end-all protection for your commander. Council's Judgment is a card, so is Arcane Lighthouse, Bonds of Mortality and Shadowspear. And while your opponents may not initially run these cards and you get a few games in where you're in the clear, these cards will soon make their way into decks.

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