Glaring Spotlight

Glaring Spotlight

Artifact

Creatures your opponents control with hexproof can be the target of spells and abilities you control as though they didn't have hexproof. 3, Sacrifice Glaring Spotlight: Creatures you control gain hexproof until end of turn and are unblockable this turn.

Browse Alters View at Gatherer

Trade

Have (0)
Want (1) RylexandertheFriendlyGOth

Printings View all

Set Rarity
Gatecrash (GTC) Rare

Combos Browse all

Legality

Format Legality
Oathbreaker Legal
Unformat Legal
Vintage Legal
Leviathan Legal
Custom Legal
Highlander Legal
Modern Legal
Legacy Legal
1v1 Commander Legal
Duel Commander Legal
Pioneer Legal
2019-10-04 Legal
Tiny Leaders Legal
Limited Legal
Block Constructed Legal
Canadian Highlander Legal
Casual Legal
Commander / EDH Legal

Glaring Spotlight occurrence in decks from the last year

Latest Decks as Commander

Glaring Spotlight Discussion

TotesMcGoats on Wizzardrix (Kwain, Itinerant Meddler)

1 week ago

OatmealBear

The Magic Mirror is some pretty INSANE card draw and we'll have a lot of instants and sorceries to get that cost down, but the ever-increasing non-optional card draw gets me worried about decking myself, so I don't think its necessary either. Once you're drawing even 1 or 2 extra cards a turn, you're really no longer concerned with needing more card advantage. That's why I love the consistency of having Kwain in the Command zone to come down on turn 2 every single game.

Shabraz, the Skyshark was another one that I was actually considering running as the commander before Kwain got spoiled because I liked the life gain and card draw. And I liked the vibe of sitting down at a table and intentionally playing partnerless. But Shabraz is a bit expensive at 5 mana and I doubt he'd ever live for long because of how fast he'd end up getting HUGE and scary and threatening with Flying.

I also considered Gwafa Hazid, Profiteer, but he's not actually as political as I wish he was. I wish he only stopped your opponents creatures from attacking you, like a pseudo-goad effect where we bribe their creatures with cards to not attack us. Alas, he basically just acts like a bad Banisher Priest.

As for Dream Trawler, Shabraz, Consecrated Sphinx and some of the other big creatures I mentioned before, you can definitely run them if you want, you just have to politic a little differently. Instead of playing the fun-loving group hug spectator, treat your creatures more like just another way to protect yourself. Save attacking with them as a last resort, or make sure you ally yourself with the rest of the table to fight against whoever is the biggest threat at the table. You just don't ever want to be that person being ganged up by everyone else, and the problem is that a lot of those creatures tend to end up quickly becoming the biggest threat. I'd say make sure to include a Rogue's Passage so that you can make sure to land the final alpha strike when you need to. People will almost assuredly have bigger boards then you, so we need a guaranteed way of getting through. Glaring Spotlight could be a good include to help you get through hexproof when you need to, or sac it when you want to go for the win.

One of my favorite aspects about this deck though is how we're playing on a completely different access from everyone else. We're here to have fun, speed things up, but also stall things out until we can combo off. Staying off everyone's radar until its too late is its biggest strength. Even if your playgroup KNOWS what your win condition is, our job is to let everyone else be bigger threats for them to have to worry about while we bide our time and set up for the win in our hand.

See, the battlefield is all about transparency. Its where most people play the game from, slowly building up boardstates and engines and scrapping back and forth here and there. Everyone can see what's in play, and who they should be concerned about. That's why I try to keep everything we put into play as unconcerning as possible, meanwhile all of our actual threats, removal, counterspells, and our win conditions, sit invisibly in our hand where no one can see them, so they don't know what to be afraid of, but everything on our battlefield tells them they probably have nothing to worry about, especially if they just leave us alone.

Telepathy is a pet card of mine that I always kind of want to find a way to fit back into the deck because it serves this purpose incredibly well. Everyone ELSE plays with their hands revealed, while you get to keep yours secret. Being able to see EXACTLY what your opponents are capable of and what you might want to save a counterspell for is GREAT for us, but its even better for our opponents to be scared of one another when they get to see every card everyone draws except for you. As good as it is for us, its not a very fun card to play against and people tend to get pretty mad about it and try to get rid of it quickly.

There's a similar issue with Zur's Weirding that seems like it COULD be an interesting inclusion with some fun politics involved, but basically every time it ends up playing out more like a STAX card that stops everyone from drawing cards and loses everyone a bunch of life instead. Its pretty unfun to be honest, and it can most likely be used against us to stop us from drawing our important combo cards, so I didn't include it either. Telepathy I'm still on the fence about.

I also tried out Approach of the Second Sun for a bit, but it had the same issue as Jace and Lab Maniac, its not good on its own, its a bit slow and obvious, and its otherwise kind of a dead draw cuz its not very good on its own. Seeing it in your opening hand is just gross. I think the concern over having a backup plan is understandable, but ultimately kind of unnecessary. I don't think I've really expressed it before, but this deck is consistent. We draw through so many cards and have so many ways of protecting ourselves and our combo that this deck tends to win a lot more than the average 25% of the time if I'm being honest. That's why I think its so important that you make sure the games are fun for everyone at the table and let everyone draw tons of cards and actually play their decks. Its why I like this specific combo too. Everyone ends up with almost their entire decks in their hands and it becomes one final ultimate showdown battle where everyone is furiously digging through their massive hand-libraries to try to find a way to stop you, and for you to try to stop them back. And if they do manage to do it, good for them! They deserve it!

Peoyogon on Tana the Enchantress

1 month ago

Wow, this looks like a lot of fun! I must say, I don't see a lot of enchantress + Voltron + red; I really like that you are going into a unique build that's all your own!

I really like Retether; I use it in my mono white Sram, Senior Edificer Voltron deck and it is amazing! Conviction/Gryff's Boon/Flickering Ward (in acending order of efectivness) are also deceptively good cards if you reliably have enchantresses out on the field.

I know you are wanting to keep to a strict theme but if you want any emergency 'go-wide-now panic buttons, Second Harvest, Glaring Spotlight, and Overwhelming Stampede are powerful options that still seem like they would operate well within the greater strategy of your deck.

StopShot on Counteracting large hexproof creatures.

2 months ago

The subject of this thread revolves around dealing with and counteracting against the commanders: Uril, the Miststalker, Sigarda, Host of Herons, Dragonlord Ojutai, Lazav, Dimir Mastermind, Thrun, the Last Troll as well as commanders that consistently or typically give themselves hexproof through various equipments/auras.

While it may not be the most prevalent strategy these types of commanders can be annoying to deal with. I'd like to create a discussion on what are the best ways to deal with these commanders. Given how niche these commanders can be, running cards that exclusively dedicate themselves to their removal may be detrimental to draw into when playing a game where none of your opponents run them. Therefore cards that can both combat massive hexproof creatures as well as still being useful to have if none of your opponents are playing with big hexproof creatures should be taken into consideration when deciding what is the "best" or "most practical" solution to combating hexproof strategies.

The first cards that come to mind are Arcane Lighthouse, Detection Tower, Bonds of Mortality, Shadowspear and Glaring Spotlight. These cards entirely dedicate themselves to combating hexproof strategies, and while this may be a detriment when used against non-hexproof strategies, these cards do lend themselves some extra utility. Arcane Lighthouse and Detection Tower can be seeded into your manabase so at worst they're just a Wastes however they can be more inefficient in comparison. Given that both are lands, tapping them costs you an extra mana resource effectively making their abilities cost to activate. Not only that, but they have no effect at stripping indestructible which can be a common keyboard which may be used alongside most hexproof strategies. Cards like Bonds of Mortality and Shadowspear cost only one to activate and they can bypass indestructible, however given they're not lands you have to dedicate a nonland slot in your deck to accommodate either of them which means taking out a card that may better synergize with your deck's main strategy in their place. They also lend themselves targets for counter spells and given hexproof decks contain white and/or green, artifact/enchantment removal will pose a high potential risk. This is all not to mention you still need to provide a removal spell in tandem with these cards in order to remove the threat.

Another solution is board wipes. Cards such as Wrath of God, Damnation, Day of Judgment, Supreme Verdict, Blasphemous Act, etc. Mass creature removal is incredibly strong given that its always relevant in most metas making it a highly flexible solution that isn't too narrow to rely upon. It's biggest drawback however is if the massive hexproof creature that needs to be dealt with has indestructible, totem armor or Gift of Immortality. Even a card such as Toxic Deluge can be a risk as you may have to pay a huge amount of life if the creature is incredibly big. Cyclonic Rift is another effective card. One thing to note about boardwipes are they affect the whole table which makes them also more likelier to be countered than by effects that impact a single individual.

A more narrow solution would be through damage prevention effects such as Story Circle, Forcefield, Runed Halo, Rune of Protection: White, etc. Given each card never "targets" they can be used to infinitely "Fog" a problem creature that you can't put up with. These effects are more narrow than boardwipes but broader than hexproof removal. Cards like these still run into problems with artifact/enchantment removal and they don't run enticing side effects such as drawing a card upon entering the battlefield like Bonds of Mortality or giving a creature lifelink and trample like Shadowspear, however you won't need to exhaust your removal spells to keep the large creature(s) either. In more broader metas such as combo, stax and prison, these effects may not be as useful however. More broader variants of these protection cards exist as Ensnaring Bridge, Divine Presence, Peacekeeper and Meekstone though these cards may make multiple opponents unhappy enough to remove them than the more narrower options.

The last effect used to combat large hexproof creatures is sacrifice effects such as: Fleshbag Marauder, Innocent Blood, Vona's Hunger, Liliana's Triumph, Doomfall etc. These effects can bypass not only hexproof but also indestructible, regenerate and totem armor. Their drawback lies in if the player with the large hexproof creature has any other creatures to sacrifice in their place. Because of this caveat this effect isn't too strong unless ran in multiples which can be difficult to commit to in a 100-card format. Instead selective sacrifice effects may be the best way to devote to this solution with cards like: Crackling Doom, Soul Shatter, Slaughter the Strong, Council's Judgment, Renounce the Guilds and Wing Shards. While these cards won't always guarantee the large hexproof creature will be removed, they provide a stronger case than not compared to most traditional sacrifice removal.

Lastly there are counter spells to remove hexproof creatures. While they may be the best all purpose solution they can be rendered ineffective if a Cavern of Souls or some other can not be countered effect is in place. With exception to Withering Boon, the biggest downside to counter spells are they are entirely exclusive to blue meaning other color combinations without blue do not have this option available.

Which method do you rely on to stop massive hexproof creatures? Is there a card or solution set not listed here that you use? If you happen to play EDH decks with big massive hexproof creatures, which effects annoy/counter you the most?

libraryjoy on Best 1-drops?

3 months ago

I like

Blue:

Cloudfin Raptor

Cosi's Trickster depending on meta (ran it in a Thada Adel, Acquisitor deck for a while)

Telepathy

Green:

Taunting Elf

Elvish Herder

Sakura-Tribe Scout

Skyshroud Ranger

Scattershot Archer (especially if you have ways to give it deathtouch)

Sedge Scorpion

Traproot Kami in mono-green

Utopia Sprawl

Wild Growth

Red:

Dragonmaster Outcast

Quest for Pure Flame

White:

Kami of False Hope

Soulmender in any build that has "Whenever you gain life" triggers

Sigarda's Aid

Spirit Link

Colorless:

Skyblinder Staff in flying heavy decks

Elixir of Immortality

Signal Pest

Animation Module

Darksteel Axe

Glaring Spotlight

Gorgon's Head

Runed Stalactite in tribal builds to protect utility creatures

Stoneforge Masterwork

And I didn't forget black, I just don't play it so I don't have anything to add for that color.

LilLandi on Sultai Hydra Tribal

3 months ago

If you can fit it into a 3 color mana base Rogue's Passage to get ur big dude through is very good

Poping the sacrifice ability on Glaring Spotlight to make the hydra squad unblockable ends game fast.

Hydras are targeted for removal a lot so Greater Good to sack in response and draw a butt-ton is crazy good

you are already running Rishkar's Expertise and I would recommend Return of the Wildspeaker and Soul's Majesty for more of that effect because drawing 10 of a massive hydra feels good

Phostration on Attack Me But Don't Hurt Me UwU

3 months ago

AjaxSlumbering Thanks! Since the deck creates a lot of tokens on my side too, I thought I could get value from Muraganda Petroglyphs to make all of them bigger. Glaring Spotlight is super cool! It reminded of Shadowspear! I think I'll definitely make room for both of them.

AjaxSlumbering on Attack Me But Don't Hurt Me UwU

3 months ago

First things first, I like how this deck looks. Lots of cards to punish anyone who swings at you, and boosts for swinging yourself. There is one thing I would recommend though, swap Muraganda Petroglyphs for Subira, Tulzidi Caravanner. You have plenty of cards that care about small creatures, but no creatures without abilities. Also, consider adding Glaring Spotlight as a finisher/protection.

Icbrgr on sideboard for bw tribal (modern)

3 months ago

I would say because you have an aggressive game plan i would put in cards in your sideboard that focus on evasion/attacking and preventing removal over shutting down an opponents deck/plan... Emerge Unscathed is pretty great in all of these categories.... Ensnaring Bridge is something that can stop you from attacking/slow you down so artifact removal of any kind its worth considering....Glaring Spotlight is also great for getting some of your own removal to work on thing like Geist of Saint Traft and or just enable easy damage to end the game.

Load more