Flawless Maneuver

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Legality

Format Legality
1v1 Commander Legal
Arena Legal
Block Constructed Legal
Canadian Highlander Legal
Commander / EDH Legal
Commander: Rule 0 Legal
Duel Commander Legal
Gladiator Legal
Highlander Legal
Historic Legal
Legacy Legal
Leviathan Legal
Limited Legal
Modern Legal
Oathbreaker Legal
Pioneer Legal
Tiny Leaders Legal
Vintage Legal
Casual Legal
Custom Legal
Quest Magic Legal

Flawless Maneuver

Instant

If you control a commander, you may cast this spell without paying its mana cost.

Creatures you control gain indestructible until end of turn.

mr5cientific on Kyler leads Humanity to Victory

16 hours ago

This deck is badass as is!

I see you have a couple indestructible effects already but I’ll go ahead and recommend Flawless Maneuver.

Eiganjo, Seat of the Empire and Boseiju, Who Endures are cool too. Not sure you need them here but just in case you want the flexibility.

It seems like you have several enters the battlefield effects. I’m not sure you have enough to warrant it but I have enjoyed running Teleportation Circle and I like how it works with your commander here

Stardragon on 3 color Generic Planeswalkers for …

1 week ago

wallisface First of all txs for taking your time to look at all of them. 2nd I'm not missing Grixis so much as I skipped it since grixis has Nicol Bolas, Planeswalker Nicol Bolas, the Deceiver and Nicol Bolas, the Arisen  Flip as solid generic grixis planeswalkers so I didn't feel the need to make another one

As for you other comments lets take one step at a time First Ceara how is not doing temur things?

I disagree with on her first ability it fine there are plenty of walkers who's + ability makes tokens so there should be no problem there as it helps protect her and give a body. As for her second I have to agree that it should be reworked. And I'll fix her last abilities wording problem

On to Chichan I may cut it down to Scry 3 but so what if it's not very red he has two other colors in his identity and every ability needs to mach each color look at Nicol Bolas, the Deceiver first ability it doesn't match blue, or look at Angrath, the Flame-Chained's last ability it fully a black ability or Dakkon, Shadow Slayer's full kit his +1 isn't white, his second ability isn't either blue nor black and his last ability is almost entirely blue. Long story short not every ability need to match every color of the walkers colors. So other than being too much it fine

As for Chichan's second ability how is it unnecessarily wordy? I tells you cast spells for free by discarding three card from your hand (maybe will cut that to two)and to make more balanced you can play two more spells the turn you use this effect so it doesn't turn into a more clunky Omniscience. The same as the argument before even if it anti white so what? And this effect isn't as anti-white as you think, while not common there are cards like Idol of Endurance,Patrician's Scorn, Flawless Maneuver, Sivvi's Ruse, Sram's Expertise and to a lesser extent Sunforger and each has a different way to make spells free, add red and blue that do have discard for effect an its fine the only reason i see no black to this effect (though all colors have some free spells)so again it fine may reword it a bit but I don't think I need to change the effect

For his third effect I agree it's underwhelming/powered and will give it a buff

For Gwisin Noh- I admit I'm not overly to happy with her but abzan has so many options it was one of the hardest things for me to make generic any ideas for new kit is welcome for now I take you ideas and rework them but don't expect to much form this one

Next is Kuva- since it fine not much to say I don't get the read from a precon deck I fail to see if that a bad thing or not?

Nimthall time ok so he may be a little overpriced i was worried that his abilities were too powerful as a kit so made him cost more to balance him out

i feel his 1st is fine i mean there are zombie token out there other than just vanilla 2/2 again not common (and not counting embalm or eternalize or decayed) but there are a few like Corpse Cobble, Soul Separator or hun that it just those two that make unqie zombie tokens really? well hun i guess I'll just make them 2/2s but feel like 1 token is an under powered effect

i saw you had no problem with his second ability so I'll just move on to the third

His third ability yeah let just is rough and need rewording now that im reading also, as for the enchantment grabbing thing it was to help justify the mana cost

Shataj Sar Spotlight time

I think your right on making only one token here and taking out horsemenship and adding vigliance or maybe first stike instead will keep the haste.

as for her last ability i like the exile part but the life gain can go

For Sibrel- Other than the either you don't seem to mind the kit overall and i don't know why the "either" is that TBH will take that out

For Vull- What are your Jund motifs i wonder

Anyway will reword his first ability but he's a battle hungry blood thirsty barbarian do you really think he not going to attack? I'll be keep his effect the same

For his second effect to tell you the truth I couldn't decide which one to choose so did both still can't decide which one would fit better since they're both jund abilities

I see you no problems with his last effect

Finally Zendik's time to shine

I don't what to say really he's not favorite thats for sure

His first ability is heavily based off Soulfire Grand Master ability only for artifacts hell was think of making this an enchantment like effect like the WoS walkers had but it also work well his second and third abilities as a whole

his second is maybe too powerful will rework it

His third ability is worded poorly but I truly don't know how to this one, and for control decks this would be a great win con to flood your opponents after you gather enough artifacts (maybe I should add enchants on to this effect as well)

Also remember to look at the kit as whole and just individual abilities, since an ability may look weak by itself but it may work very well with the other abilities together Zendik is great example of this

amarthaler on EDH Vampiric Bloodlust (C17 Precon Upgrade)

2 weeks ago

Update!

Out: 1. Akoum Refuge 2. Bloodfell Caves 3. Boros Garrison 4. Kabira Crossroads 5. Orzhov Basilica 6. Rakdos Carnarium 7. Scoured Barrens 8. Wind-Scarred Crag 9. Opal Palace 10. Path of Ancestry 11. Well of Lost Dreams 12. Merciless Eviction 13. Fell the Mighty 14. Blood Baron of Vizkopa

In: 1. Plains x4 2. Mountain x4 3. Eiganjo, Seat of the Empire 4. Takenuma, Abandoned Mire 5. Farewell 6. Toxic Deluge 7. Welcoming Vampire 8. Flawless Maneuver

The land base needed to be refined a bit, so I got rid of anything that comes in tapped and replaced them with basic lands. I also added two legendary lands from Kamigawa, Neon Dynasty.

The board wipes, although decent, were replaced with two that have more flexibility in them - Farewell and Toxic Deluge.

Flawless Maneuver is something I'd like to play test in this deck, so it replaced Well of Lost Dreams since we don't really have a heavy lifegain strategy in this deck (and Necropotence is already in the deck).

Lastly, Blood Baron Vizkopa was replaced with Welcoming Vampire to benefit more off our token strategy with Eminence.

Guerric on Deck Archetypes in EDH

1 month ago

Hi all! There's an interesting question I've been pondering lately, and I thought I'd share some of my reflections on it and get input from all of you. In sixty card magic we have deck archetypes, namely aggro, control, midrange, combo, and tempo. In commander obviously things look pretty different, and several years ago on the Command Zone podcast they said that like in limited, there aren't really deck archetypes this way, just different flavors of midrange.

As the format has developed and changed a lot over the years I do think something like these archetypes exists in commander, they're just different. For those familiar with sixty card formats some of the hard and fast rules for those archetypes in sixty card magic do not apply, and there certainly is more fluidity on commander and other unique multiplayer strategies as well (ex. Group Hug). Nonetheless, I think the outline of most of these archetypes is still relevant. Here is how I think it plays out-

1) Aggro- I think something more like classic aggro has only become viable in commander in the past couple of years, but I think it is definitely a thing now. In sixty card magic, most creatures are in the one to three drop range, there is often no focus on card draw, and everything in the deck serves to get a single player to zero as quickly as possible. Obviously in commander we need raw engines, some ramp, and are going to play more powerful cards. That being said, I think strategies built around attacking with high value, low cmc creatures from the early game onwards characterizes aggro in commander. This wasn't viable a few years ago due to the lack of board state protection, and really only token pump decks and creature cheat decks tended to do well. But the printing of many premium white board state protection spells like Flawless Maneuver, Teferi's Protection, and Semester's End has changed up the formula a bit. Attacking low to the ground and early is a keystone of aggro strategies, but so are on attack triggers. We have so many of these now, and they incentivize keeping our force swinging every turn. Commanders like Akiri, Fearless Voyager and Trynn, Champion of Freedom incentivize attacking in order to draw cards, make tokens, or do other things the deck is going to want to do. Unlike sixty card magic, we will need to be able to draw cards, and play some removal and interaction, though we'll play fewer pieces of the latter here than in other decks since they compete with resources to keep up the attack. We also need to play one-sided board wipes wherever we have the option, because we can't afford to lose our own board state. We'll also need a way to get through for damage once our opponents' defenses are up, and as such things that give our creatures menace, landwalk, flying, deathtouch or indestructible are key as they help us keep up the assault. We're also very in favor of a few key pump spells to help us finish out the game like Jazal Goldmane or Coat of Arms.

2) Midrange- In sixty card magic midrange is characterized by playing some of the most powerful cards on every point in the curve, and play more removal than aggro decks. Oftentimes they are characterized as "the growing threat." A classic and famous example was the classic Modern Jund deck that Reid Duke piloted several years ago. One of its touchstones was playing Tarmogoyf on turn 2. The goyfs could attack or block where necessary, but they would grow more unstoppable as the game went on, until they were dropping haymakers like Liliana of the Veil. They would use cards like Dark Confidant to keep their hand full till they could inevitably win. In a way, these sorts of decks mirror something of what we see in all commander decks in that they play removal, draw, and powerful cards. Yet what I think sets them apart is this idea of the growing threat, and that they play more removal than aggro decks. One way in which I think some midrange commanders work is to have abilities that allow them to turn other cards into Tarmogoyf like threats. Ezuri, Claw of Progress and Giada, Font of Hope use +1/+1 counters to turn small evasive threates into significant ones. In this sense, I think a lot of counter decks fit well in the midrange categories. These decks will attack, but they don't have to like aggro decks, and are more willing to conserve resources and work on developing board state where feasible. They often have engines that benefit their board passively from the passage of time, and as such they can play more removal and let their board build itself. They still want to protect their board state, and some of the cards from aggro decks that do this or simply counterspells can help with this, and one-sided board wipes are usually th best kind for midrange decks as well.

3) Control- Control decks in sixty card magic are built on trying to shut down almost everything an opponent is trying to do via counterspells and removal until you can work towards a win con. This obviously is not possible in commander where you can not shut down three other players with just counterspells and removal alone, and isn't always necessary since opponents can also shut down each other. As such, controlling strategies fit into two categories: stax and regular control. With stax pieces that shut off lands and mana rocks, eEDH controlling strategies indeed can effectively shut down three other players, usually finding a way to work through it themselves in order to build towards a win con. In standard EDH, heavy land-based stax like that is frowned upon, but cards that disrupt play in other ways (ex. Blind Obedience as well as counterspells and removal are fair game. These decks are still building towards a win con by slowing opponents down, and will devote far more slots to disruption and removal than aggro and midrange decks. They may win with an infinite combo, a planeswalker, a few premium attacking creatures, or in other ways, but most of the deck is devoted to protecting themselves and disrupting opponents. Controlling decks are more likely to play reciprocal board wipes, and generally benefit from keeping the board clear of threats at most times.

4) Combo- Combo decks also exist along a spectrum in EDH, though this archetype is most similar to sixty card magic. The formula is almost unchanged for cEDH, where most of a deck is devoted to playing and protecting a single combo. Outside of cEDH, it is worth mentioning that infinite combos can be included in almost any archetype in the format as a backup win con when other plans go sideways. What makes it a combo deck is that the entire deck is focused on pulling out one of a variety of sometimes elaborate combos, and these decks are generally geared more towards Johnnies than Spikes. A good example would be combo decks built around Teysa, Orzhov Scion that can put together the Darkest Hour in a variety of ways, as well as play Reveillark + Karmic Guide and/or Sanguine Bond + Exquisite Blood in order to win. These decks play out as trying to put together a combo while fending off opponents with removal and interaction.

5) Tempo- Some might argue that there is no such thing as tempo decks in commander, but it's worth mentioning that they're pretty rare even in sixty card magic across formats. In sixty card magic tempo decks adopt a "disruptive aggro" philosophy, where they slowly chip away at an opponent's life total with small, cheap, evasive creatures, while always holding mana open to protect their board and disrupt threats. While "chipping away" life totals isn't much of a strategy in a multiplayer strategy, I do think there are decks that play out along the lines of this disruptive aggro strategy. As an example, Ranar the Ever-Watchful and Alela, Artful Provocateur can be played this way, where the flying tokens they generate are the main win con, and the rest of the deck is devoted to holding mana open to protect this main game plan and stop others from winning. Unlike in sixty card decks these may win all at once with token pump effects or other affects, but this is the main way.

What do you all think? Do you think there are deck archetypes like this in EDH? Why or why not? What qualifications would you add or take away about them if you do?

Guerric on Dealing with politics as an …

1 month ago

Hi Dazard! What a great question! I avoided aggro strategies for awhile for this reason, but as my sneaky combo strategies are hard for some groups I play with to decode, I decided to make some good old honest aggro decks, and I think I've figured out a good balance.

To begin with, don't play like in a 60 card, 1v1 format. In those games you have little incentive not to go for broke all the time, and to commit all of your resources right away. In EDH there are several key principles of good aggro play.

One of them is controlled growth. Even if you can commit all of your resources to powerful plays early you shouldn't do so. You need to make sure that you set up card draw engines and other things to keep your tank full in the long run. You should be attacking, but keep in mind you don't need to attack with everything. Chip away at peoples' life totals rather than hitting one person hard. Once you slam one person you will be the archenemy of all, so don't do that till you are a turn or two from winning or they will destroy you. Knocking out an opponent early doesn't necessarily help as that person is a target for someone else and can help keep someone else under control.

A second principle is try to win all at once via pump effects. Its almost better to keep your tokens as 1/1s as long as possible and then suddenly in a single turn make them gamewinning with Coat of Arms, Shared Animosity, Jazal Goldmane, or Mirror Entity. Don't play these cards early either! Your opponents will just kill them, so play them the turn that you can win. Surprise is one of the most powerful things in EDH. If they know you can kill them you are a threat, if they don't see it coming you will win.

Thirdly is politics via threat assessment, not deals. Sometimes people just think of politics as bribery, but its better to simply point out what other opponents are doing. "Hmm..he just played Ashnod's Altar. That's a combo piece. What's he up to?" is far more powerful than promising not to attack someone. This is self-interested, but it is also helping your opponents play better by noticing more than obvious threats. When I play against aggro I might have a board wipe, and yet hold off if I'm not afraid of imminently dying to let the aggro player do some of my dirty work for me and keep attention away from the combo I am putting together. My one friend who has been quite good at aggro has become adept at pointing out what I am doing and keeping things honest. It's also a good idea with early attacks to take turns attacking different opponents for only a small amount of damage, or even rolling the dice to see who you'll attack first. If your opponents wonder why you're holding back you can just say somewhat honestly that you're trying to spread the love around and keep blockers and critical pieces in play.

A fourth principle is board state protection. Others mentioned Unbreakable Formation and Teferi's Protection as helpful cards. Don't forget also about Make a Stand, Flawless Maneuver, and Cosmic Intervention. The latter won't save your tokens, but it will save other pieces. The same is true with Eerie Interlude and Semester's End which can also dodge even a Cyclonic Rift. Lapse of Certainty can also delay a board wipe for a turn and waste your opponents' investment, and is good tech as well. Eldrazi Monument is also a good card, because you'll have endless tokens to fuel it, and all of your stuff will be flying and indestructible, keeping your opponents from easily stopping you. One final way in your deck is just by making board wipes painful, which you can do with aristocrats. Blood Artist and Syr Konrad, the Grim will make your opponent think twice about wiping the board. Again, don't commit too many resources at once, and hold up mana for protection. This helps with controlled growth and helps you rest easy during your opponents' turns.

A fifth principle that is great is to always have a backup plane for when things go wrong. One way to do this is to have a single infinite combo to win out of nowhere when things are down. When you're playing aggro opponents are always looking at your board state, but they can be taken by surprise when you combo the win. For Markov the best one is probably Exquisite Blood and Sanguine Bond. If your opponents can win with this stuff then its only fair that you can in a pinch too! This also fulfills the old idea talked about on MtgGoldfish that you should always have a way to win out of nowhere. The other and more honest way to do this is just to have a way to recover your board state. Patriarch's Bidding and Haunting Voyage can help you recover all of your creatures in a single turn. Having these backup plans will make life easier.

Don't get discouraged, aggro is better than ever in EDH today due to new board protection and recovery tech Wizards has printed and reprinted in the past couple of years. All you need to do is master the playstyle and you'll have a lot more fun and success!

temeref on Taunts & Trickery

2 months ago

Talanar Sentinel is a nice addition -- as for the cards mentioned, I didn't include them since I didn't have em/intend on getting them due to their price; I'd bet they're perfect includes, and since you've got em, absolutely slot em in! Could easily swap out that Oreskos Explorer for Flawless Maneuver, probably along-side Ghostway in place of Favorable Destiny and you'd be in a better state defense-wise. Oreskos was intended to be a non- Land Tax method of making sure my lower land count doesn't brick me as often, and flickering it seemed like a fun way to ensure that, but hey, if it doesn't work, it doesn't work! Not gonna pretend like my decks are perfect haha.

And yeah! I love building weirder cards to try and make em' work. This deck's probably one of my favorites I've done for that concept; the Wild Pair & 4 total power/toughness shenanigans finally put my itch to build around the dang card to rest. Failed so many times trying it lol but I feel like this deck's finally the one.

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