Dark Confidant

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Legality

Format Legality
1v1 Commander Legal
Block Constructed Legal
Canadian Highlander Legal
Commander / EDH Legal
Commander: Rule 0 Legal
Duel Commander Legal
Highlander Legal
Legacy Legal
Leviathan Legal
Limited Legal
Modern Legal
Oathbreaker Legal
Tiny Leaders Legal
Vintage Legal
Casual Legal
Custom Legal
Quest Magic Legal

Dark Confidant

Creature — Human Wizard

At the beginning of your upkeep, reveal the top card of your library and put that card into your hand. You lose life equal to its converted mana cost/mana value card.

firefist87 on Modern Mill-Castic

2 weeks ago

Wow, some great recommendations, thank you! Also I believe you mean Dark Confidant, but do you think Fraying Sanity should stay in the deck?

Hi_diddly_ho_neighbor on Commander Legends: Battle for Baldur's …

1 month ago

Nine-Finger Keene is awesome and a candidate for my favorite legend of the set. That being said, three colors is quite the restriction as we only have 6 gates in those colors currently (including the 2 noew ones spoiled from this set). This set really needs to go gate crazy if Keene is going to work. Should've been 4 colors at least.

Legion Loyalty: I want to love this card. It's ability is very cool, but at 8 mana, you want your cards to be game ending or catapult you very far ahead on it's own. This requires you to already have a board state of creatures able to attack, and it gets perpetually worse the fewer opponents you have. The card should've been 5-6 mana.

Arhivist of Oghama, new white staple incoming. An excellent little value/tax piece.

Pact Weapon seems deceptively strong for an equipment. It's a Platinum Angel, Dark Confidant, and madness enabler all in one package.

Ascend from Avernus is an awesome mass reanimation spell and probably the best in white.

The various Orbs of Dragonkind are quite nice. Since dragons are costly, giving one haste (red orb) or hexproof until your next turn (green orb) are really nice effects. The blue orb is nice for value, but not on the same level as the red and green ones.

Displacer Kitten is going to be a problem, calling it now.

Campfire seems like a great card for all of those high cmc commanders. Phage the Untouchable especially likes it.

ThisIsMyAccount on Death Race

1 month ago

Dark Confidant and Apostle's Blessing are cards to consider for this strategy. Apostle's Blessing will give you a way to attack through creatures with a big Death's Shadow or Scourge and also give the creature protection on the turn you swing for lethal damage. Dark Confidant can give staying power against decks playing control, life gain, or discard effects that can disrupt your fast clock.

Guerric on Deck Archetypes in EDH

1 month ago

Hi all! There's an interesting question I've been pondering lately, and I thought I'd share some of my reflections on it and get input from all of you. In sixty card magic we have deck archetypes, namely aggro, control, midrange, combo, and tempo. In commander obviously things look pretty different, and several years ago on the Command Zone podcast they said that like in limited, there aren't really deck archetypes this way, just different flavors of midrange.

As the format has developed and changed a lot over the years I do think something like these archetypes exists in commander, they're just different. For those familiar with sixty card formats some of the hard and fast rules for those archetypes in sixty card magic do not apply, and there certainly is more fluidity on commander and other unique multiplayer strategies as well (ex. Group Hug). Nonetheless, I think the outline of most of these archetypes is still relevant. Here is how I think it plays out-

1) Aggro- I think something more like classic aggro has only become viable in commander in the past couple of years, but I think it is definitely a thing now. In sixty card magic, most creatures are in the one to three drop range, there is often no focus on card draw, and everything in the deck serves to get a single player to zero as quickly as possible. Obviously in commander we need raw engines, some ramp, and are going to play more powerful cards. That being said, I think strategies built around attacking with high value, low cmc creatures from the early game onwards characterizes aggro in commander. This wasn't viable a few years ago due to the lack of board state protection, and really only token pump decks and creature cheat decks tended to do well. But the printing of many premium white board state protection spells like Flawless Maneuver, Teferi's Protection, and Semester's End has changed up the formula a bit. Attacking low to the ground and early is a keystone of aggro strategies, but so are on attack triggers. We have so many of these now, and they incentivize keeping our force swinging every turn. Commanders like Akiri, Fearless Voyager and Trynn, Champion of Freedom incentivize attacking in order to draw cards, make tokens, or do other things the deck is going to want to do. Unlike sixty card magic, we will need to be able to draw cards, and play some removal and interaction, though we'll play fewer pieces of the latter here than in other decks since they compete with resources to keep up the attack. We also need to play one-sided board wipes wherever we have the option, because we can't afford to lose our own board state. We'll also need a way to get through for damage once our opponents' defenses are up, and as such things that give our creatures menace, landwalk, flying, deathtouch or indestructible are key as they help us keep up the assault. We're also very in favor of a few key pump spells to help us finish out the game like Jazal Goldmane or Coat of Arms.

2) Midrange- In sixty card magic midrange is characterized by playing some of the most powerful cards on every point in the curve, and play more removal than aggro decks. Oftentimes they are characterized as "the growing threat." A classic and famous example was the classic Modern Jund deck that Reid Duke piloted several years ago. One of its touchstones was playing Tarmogoyf on turn 2. The goyfs could attack or block where necessary, but they would grow more unstoppable as the game went on, until they were dropping haymakers like Liliana of the Veil. They would use cards like Dark Confidant to keep their hand full till they could inevitably win. In a way, these sorts of decks mirror something of what we see in all commander decks in that they play removal, draw, and powerful cards. Yet what I think sets them apart is this idea of the growing threat, and that they play more removal than aggro decks. One way in which I think some midrange commanders work is to have abilities that allow them to turn other cards into Tarmogoyf like threats. Ezuri, Claw of Progress and Giada, Font of Hope use +1/+1 counters to turn small evasive threates into significant ones. In this sense, I think a lot of counter decks fit well in the midrange categories. These decks will attack, but they don't have to like aggro decks, and are more willing to conserve resources and work on developing board state where feasible. They often have engines that benefit their board passively from the passage of time, and as such they can play more removal and let their board build itself. They still want to protect their board state, and some of the cards from aggro decks that do this or simply counterspells can help with this, and one-sided board wipes are usually th best kind for midrange decks as well.

3) Control- Control decks in sixty card magic are built on trying to shut down almost everything an opponent is trying to do via counterspells and removal until you can work towards a win con. This obviously is not possible in commander where you can not shut down three other players with just counterspells and removal alone, and isn't always necessary since opponents can also shut down each other. As such, controlling strategies fit into two categories: stax and regular control. With stax pieces that shut off lands and mana rocks, eEDH controlling strategies indeed can effectively shut down three other players, usually finding a way to work through it themselves in order to build towards a win con. In standard EDH, heavy land-based stax like that is frowned upon, but cards that disrupt play in other ways (ex. Blind Obedience as well as counterspells and removal are fair game. These decks are still building towards a win con by slowing opponents down, and will devote far more slots to disruption and removal than aggro and midrange decks. They may win with an infinite combo, a planeswalker, a few premium attacking creatures, or in other ways, but most of the deck is devoted to protecting themselves and disrupting opponents. Controlling decks are more likely to play reciprocal board wipes, and generally benefit from keeping the board clear of threats at most times.

4) Combo- Combo decks also exist along a spectrum in EDH, though this archetype is most similar to sixty card magic. The formula is almost unchanged for cEDH, where most of a deck is devoted to playing and protecting a single combo. Outside of cEDH, it is worth mentioning that infinite combos can be included in almost any archetype in the format as a backup win con when other plans go sideways. What makes it a combo deck is that the entire deck is focused on pulling out one of a variety of sometimes elaborate combos, and these decks are generally geared more towards Johnnies than Spikes. A good example would be combo decks built around Teysa, Orzhov Scion that can put together the Darkest Hour in a variety of ways, as well as play Reveillark + Karmic Guide and/or Sanguine Bond + Exquisite Blood in order to win. These decks play out as trying to put together a combo while fending off opponents with removal and interaction.

5) Tempo- Some might argue that there is no such thing as tempo decks in commander, but it's worth mentioning that they're pretty rare even in sixty card magic across formats. In sixty card magic tempo decks adopt a "disruptive aggro" philosophy, where they slowly chip away at an opponent's life total with small, cheap, evasive creatures, while always holding mana open to protect their board and disrupt threats. While "chipping away" life totals isn't much of a strategy in a multiplayer strategy, I do think there are decks that play out along the lines of this disruptive aggro strategy. As an example, Ranar the Ever-Watchful and Alela, Artful Provocateur can be played this way, where the flying tokens they generate are the main win con, and the rest of the deck is devoted to holding mana open to protect this main game plan and stop others from winning. Unlike in sixty card decks these may win all at once with token pump effects or other affects, but this is the main way.

What do you all think? Do you think there are deck archetypes like this in EDH? Why or why not? What qualifications would you add or take away about them if you do?

SufferFromEDHD on Sidisi Land Nauseam

2 months ago

I looked over my list again and found 5 cards that add value and make it less fragile:

Urza's Saga for all those good mana rocks.

Defense Grid cheap colorless counter/removal protection.

Dark Confidant The one deck it works in EDH haha pure value! Sidisi fodder or fodder for my next suggestion...

Phyrexian Tribute a way for mono black to deal with pesky artifacts.

Feed the Swarm a way for mono black to deal with pesky enchantments.

rambunctiousOrator on it's a deck alright

2 months ago

Hey, sweet deck. Let's take a look at win conditions and lands. I've identified a problem with your deck: You aggressively want to control the board with your 1-3 drops. While other players are playing 6 mana bombs every turn your are trying to eke out board advantage with 3 or 4 creatures a turn.

  • You don't need board wipes in this deck, they actively go against your game-plan, and in no way help you win.
  • Less removal in general. I counted 18 pieces of removal in your instants and sorceries. Keep Path to Exile, Swords to Plowshares, and Damn and get rid of the rest. You ARE the threat, if your deck is running slowly to the point that you feel like you need removal, you need better creatures.

As for lands, use this mana base.

Lands:

How would I change your win condition...well you are trying to do knight tribal...

Consider these cards:

Remove these cards:

-15 pieces of removal from instants and sorceries, keep Path to Exile, Swords to Plowshares, and Damn

Good luck, and happy hunting. Let me know if you want to continue the conversation or have questions

wallisface on Like Suicide

2 months ago

Combining Dark Confidant with Shadow of Mortality seems like a really bad idea, it's going to be far too easy to dome-yourself for 15 and lose the game. Even running Dark Confidant alongside Street Wraith seems life far too big a risk for an archetype that is often trying to carefully manage their life total.

I don't think Dark Confidant has a home here.

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