Terminate

Legality

Format Legality
Tiny Leaders Legal
Noble Legal
Leviathan Legal
Magic Duels Legal
Canadian Highlander Legal
Vintage Legal
Modern Legal
Casual Legal
Pauper EDH Legal
Vanguard Legal
Legacy Legal
Archenemy Legal
Planechase Legal
1v1 Commander Legal
Duel Commander Legal
Unformat Legal
Pauper Legal
Commander / EDH Legal

Printings View all

Set Rarity
Commander 2017 (C17) Uncommon
Commander Anthology (CM1) Uncommon
Modern Masters 2017 Edition (MM3) Uncommon
Commander 2016 (C16) Common
Duel Decks: Sorin vs. Tibalt (DDK) Common
MTG: Commander (CMD) Common
Archenemy (ARC) Common
Alara Reborn (ARB) Common
Planeshift (PLS) Common
Promo Set (000) Common
Promo set for Gatherer (PSG) Rare

Combos Browse all

Terminate

Instant

Destroy target creature. It can't be regenerated.

Price & Acquistion Set Price Alerts

C17

CM1

MM3

Ebay

Recent Decks

Terminate Discussion

Tyrant-Thanatos on Let's Discuss: Shards, Wedges, and ...

1 day ago

Favorite Shard: Grixis

Manipulative, cruel, powerful. Edicts, burn, bounce, counterspells, everything control can be found here, and with a handful of evasive, aggressive creatures to swoop in with once you've established control of the board, or you can play the slow-burn game with effects like Nekusar, the Mindrazer. Put your opponent(s) on a clock and deny them the ability to stop it. Plus their ability to run some of the meanest creatures in the form of things like Kederekt Creeper, Baleful Strix, Master of Cruelties, etc. So much fun to be had.

Honorable mention to Esper for similar reasons. Oloro, Ageless Ascetic, Punish Ignorance, etc. Good shit.

Favorite Wedge: Abzan

Relentless power. I love Abzan because of its resilience, strength, and versatility. I'm not a huge fan of a lot of Abzan specific cards, but being able to run things like Animate Dead, Sun Titan, Brave the Sands, alongside gigantic green creatures like Ghalta, Primal Hunger, Ghoultree, Avatar of Might, etc is just incredible. The incredible suite of removal that B/W brings to the table in the form of Vindicate, Anguished Unmaking, Utter End, etc, combined with the might of Green creatures, further compounded by the volume of powerful reanimation effects these colors all have, builds a powerful, versatile deck that just never gives up. I've run Abzan decks that have had their most crucial cards hit with Slaughter Games type effects, and they still didn't stop, didn't slow down, and pulled out a win.

Another Honorable Mention to Sultai. Muldrotha, the Gravetide is amazing, Damia, Sage of Stone is probably one of my top 10 favorite cards ever, and Sultai Charm works wonders.

Favorite Allied Guild: Rakdos

Rakdos just knows how to throw a party. Every time I've built Rakdos I end up having fun, win or lose. Chaotic game-changers like Everlasting Torment, Havoc Festival, and Sire Of Insanity just bring a lot of shenanigans to the table that people just aren't prepared to deal with. Terminate is one of the kings of removal. Cards like Backlash, Delirium, and Rakdos Charm punish a variety of opposing playstyles. The individual colors also contribute a lot to your ability to handle creatures, and create even more chaos. Endless Whispers, Scrambleverse, you name it.

I cannot wait to get my hands on Last One Standing.

Favorite Enemy Guild: Simic

This one is simple, these two colors compliment each other so well it's insane. There is almost nothing that exists in this game that Simic cannot do. Green's weakness is its inability to manipulate the board much without combat. Blue's weakness is in its board presence and creatures. They are ideal together. Ramp, removal, aggro, counterspells, creature control, resilience. Simic has all its bases covered, and with just two colors. Mystic Snake, Trygon Predator, Kiora's Follower, Plasm Capture, Voidslime, Simic Charm, these cards are amazing, and that's without getting into the mono-color cards.

I'd also like to throw out some love for "Growth", the combination. The only pure Growth cards we have thus far are Atraxa, Praetors' Voice, and Witch-Maw Nephilim, but boy what cards they are. But the colors themselves are awesome together. G/U's flexibility, W/B's removal, much less other multicolor synergies, access to Abzan cards, Sultai cards, Esper cards. Obviously the mana base gets complicated fast, and it can be hard to handle, but if it works, it works.

TypicalTimmy on Let's Discuss: Shards, Wedges, and ...

1 day ago

Hello everyone, :)

I thought this would be a nice topic to discuss and just waste time with. It'd be nice to throw around ideas and opinions, as well as help introduce newer players to terms and mechanics they may be unfamiliar with.

What are your favorite Shards, Wedges, and Guilds and what about them appeals the most to you, and why?

Each of these terms refers to multicolored pairings. The difference is how many colors are paired.

Shards, referring to Shards of Alara, are a three-color pairing of either of the following five combinations:

  • Bant ()
  • Esper ()
  • Grixis ()
  • Jund ()
  • Naya ()

The unique aspect of Shards is that it is a single color paired with BOTH of it's Allied Colors. This tends to make Shards uniquely powerful in respect to their ability to play off of one-another's strengths. Such is the case with Esper, having the controlling aspects of white, blue, and black all at it's disposal. Or for another example, Naya which plays off being able to create vast tokens and make them huge, quickly.

Wedges, named after the clans of Tarkir, are the following:

  • Abzan ()
  • Jeskai ()
  • Sultai )
  • Mardu )
  • Temur ).

What makes Wedges powerful is that by aligning with BOTH of it's Enemy Colors, it is able to become far more flexible in it's assault. You can do multiple things, easier, with Wedges. For example, in Temur you can have the benefit of big creatures / ramp while still maintaining a decent pool of counter spells or burn spells as you see fit. Abzan is known for making huge creatures with +1/+1 counters, but what's nice is that while you strengthen your boardstate, you can also create a large divide between life totals with white and black pulling each other apart.

Guilds, named after the Guilds of Ravnica, are uniquely powerful in their own right. There are ten of them in total, which means there are five that are Allied Colors and five that are Enemy Colors. These play into the same benefits, and therefore weakness, as the Shards and Wedges from prior - Just to a somewhat lesser degree in terms of their overall flexibility. But what they lack in flexibility, they make up for in their potential. The less colors you have, the more honed your deck can become toward a singular (or duality, in some cases) goal.

The Allied Guilds are the following:

  • Azorius Senate ()
  • House Dimir ()
  • Cult of Rakdos ()
  • Gruul Clans ()
  • Selesnya Conclave ()

The Allied Guilds are powerful in their respect that their two colors benefit from the same strategy. Both white and blue love to control, so Azorius is a powerhouse in control. Both black and red love to destroy, so Rakdos is a slaughterhouse in mayhem.

On the other side of the coin are the Enemy Guilds.

The Enemy Guilds are the following:

  • Orzhov Syndicate ()
  • Izzet League ()
  • Golgari Swarm ()
  • Simic Combine ()
  • Boros Legion ()

What makes the Enemy Guilds powerful is actually their seemingly contradictory ideologies. For example, if black loves to kill, but green loves to grow... Then how in the heck can the Golgari Swarm even function?? Simple. You sling big creatures into your graveyard, and resurrect them for a lot less. Likewise, if red wants to burn but white wants to control and spread, How can Boros work?? Well, if you play cheap white control cards and bide your time to heavy burn spells, you can spread life totals and board advantage farther in your favor with each passing turn.

Every one of these, be it a Shard, a Wedge, or a Guild has a unique purpose that can be built around. It's up to us, the players, to find those purposes and build upon each of their individually unique abilities.

So with that being said, I'm curious: What are your favorite Shards, Wedges, and Guilds and why?

I personally love big, flashy cards. For me, winning is a lot more enjoyable if I can do so by bringing some kind of unique flare to the game. For example, Reverberating a See the Unwritten to free-cast four of my most powerful creatures from the top 16 cards of my library is totally awesome and fun. Likewise, nuking the board with Bontu's Last Reckoning and dropping in an Eerie Interlude on top of it is just painfully hilarious.

I absolutely adore Gruul for it's fast-paced, huge beatsticks that only serve to die in glorious combat.

But I also love the divide Orzhov creates, where I can just sit back and let life totals aggro out of control.

But I'd have to say, if I feel especially aggressive and shitty, I can always just kill everything in my warpath with Rakdos. Oh, you Meddling Mage'd my Terminate. Haha... Murdered. Screw you.

For Wedges and Shards, I like to go more broad rather than narrow. For this, Jund, Esper, and Naya are my go-to combinations.

Jund, essentially the love-child of Gruul and Rakdos, gives me my stupidly big creatures with my sociopathic onslaught.

What I love about Esper though is it's ability to hit multiple angles at once. Do I want to mill? I can. Do I want to raise some tokens? I can. Do I want to counter your spells? I can. Do I want to stop you from even playing the game?? ... Yeah, I can. Esper is like a blank canvas. I could build three Esper decks in the same format, and all three do something totally different. And I love that.

And with Naya, well... If you're a self-proclaimed Timmy and you DON'T love Naya, then you're not a Timmy, now are you? ;)

.....

Woah. I literally just noticed that all three of my favorite three-colored combinations are actually Shards. See, already learning stuff about ourselves :D And that's exactly why I wanted to make this thread :3

Gronlok on Red Black Dragons

3 days ago

Hey man, cool build!!! I love the theme. Basically the plan is stay alive until you can get enough mana to cast them. Without changing up your creatures at all, and keeping Dragon Fodder and Crux of Fate in the mix, we have 16 cards to flex. I would remove all of the other 16 and instead run the following modern staples.

Add

4 Anger of the Gods 4 Inquisition of Kozilek 4 Thoughtseize 4 Terminate.

23 lands should look more like this if you want to get serious

4 Dragonskull Summit 4 Bloodstained Mire 4 Blood Crypt 4 Sulfurous Springs 3 Wooded Foothills 2 Mountain 2 Swamp

RingweMakil on Ravaging Command

3 days ago

Nathanaiel - exactly, the other two options are not the best, and if I am to increase the number of manlands, I'd probably just advocate for the third Tar Pit. However, too many taplands is very much a concern in this list, so for now, I'm sticking to two. Hopefully, with Search for Azcanta  Flip, Jace, the Mind Sculptor and Pull from Tomorrow, flood won't be an issue.

You definitely can't kill Tron before they start playing out their threats. That is not the plan, however; the plan is to deal with their threats with some combination of countermagic and discard to buy enough time to then enable one of your own threats to end the game. That said, Olivia Voldaren and Kalitas, Traitor of Ghet both do match up very well against Wurmcoil Engine.

Now, regarding the many 1 of's and 2 of's - the traditional deckbuilding strategy is to have as many 3 and 4 of's as possible in order to maximise the chances of seeing those cards over the course of a game. To what end? The idea is, if you see the same cards every game, then you will know what the deck does, and it will do so consistently. However, there is another way for a deck to be consistent, and this is seen, for instance, in EDH decks - you have a bunch of cards that perform a similar role, and so even though they are different cards, they carry out the same function, and therefore behave much like the same card in certain situations.

For instance, against a turn 2 Tarmogoyf, Terminate, Dreadbore and Fatal Push are eight cards that all do exactly the same thing - so instead of seeing the cards as 3 Terminate and 1 Dreadbore, you can treat the lot as four removal spells. Similarly, at the four drop slot, Kalitas, Traitor of Ghet, Olivia Voldaren, Jace, the Mind Sculptor and Nicol Bolas, the Ravager  Flip are all powerful threats that must be answered. Yes, it's 3, 1, 1, 1 - or, it's 6 powerful four drops.

Packages like this mean you can fill your deck with a lot of versatile and powerful cards so that you can in any given situation make use of that flexibility to concoct a game plan. Understanding the precise role and niche each card in the deck occupies means you can have a bunch of one-ofs that will do something in each situation, and then combined with the effects of the other cards drawn alongside those one or two of's, you can craft a cohesive strategy.

For instance, against dredge - you draw Kalitas, plus a bunch of removal spells. The plan? Play Kalitas, start exiling stuff, stabilise that way. But instead, say you draw Olivia. Then the plan is to use Olivia to recurringly kill their guys, then win the game quickly off burn and her giant flying attacks before they can dump their yard on the board again. Again, say against dredge, post board, the four drop you have is Damnation. Then combined with Extirpate you should be able to stabilise.

Again, against Jund - they have a Liliana of the Veil in play they just plused. If you have Sedraxis Specter, then you discard that, and finish Lili off in conjunction with any other threat or burn. If you have Dreadbore, just kill her straight up. If you instead just have four drop threats, use them and Snapcaster Mage or Kolaghan's Command to overload LoTV's minus.

Against tokens, you might draw Olivia Voldaren, Engineered Explosives, Izzet Staticaster, or Damnation. These are all 1 or 2 ofs, but they are all cards that will get you out against an army of Lingering Souls. Against zoo, you might draw Engineered Explosives, Damnation, or Fatal Push, and they'll all help you get through zoo's early aggression.

In none of these situations do you have exactly the same cards, yet with the cards you do have, you should be able to find a way out. That's because the cards in question are powerful and flexible, allowing you to craft different strategies according to the situation, meaning overall, you don't really mind which 1 or 2 specific cards you draw over the course of a game; even though you can't expect to see the exact 1 or 2 of every game, you can expect to see some number of cards which will together help you find a winning line.

EpicBox75 on Grixis Delver

4 days ago

Hey Boza and thank you for the criticism it helps that other people give their thoughts.

What I have played (which is not much) yes the mana base can be little bit off and many times Counterspell would been better than Mana Leak. Because the deck has stuff like Ponder and Brainstorm to me it feels that the deck needs shuffle effects and I don't know other good shuffle effects than lands and that is why I play Evolving Wilds, Terramorphic Expanse and Ash Barrens.

I just have to say that the deck splashes black for Gurmag Angler and Terminate because the deck is based on Izzet Delver decks that I modified little bit with black. Just made sure that you know when you stated "getting access to terminate and lightning bolt" and to me it felt that you thought that this deck splashes red.

jpermar on The Downward Spiral

1 week ago

Changes:

The deck needs a bit more card selection/draw. So in go Chandra, Torch of Defiance, Night's Whisper and Faithless Looting. These will help if, for example, we get mana flooded. Kaervek the Merciless is on theme (The Downward Spiral). Terminate will help out whenever needed.

It was tough to determine was to take out. Balefire Dragon is sweet with haste, but doesn't fit into this deck since we cast creatures after combat damage. That's the reason that Urabrask the Hidden is coming out as well. The other cards are good but not what I've found this deck needs.

cplvela0811 on Mardu Pyromancer should play Path ...

1 week ago

Someone is thinking "but that would screw with Blood Moon." Now, while true - there is no need for Terminate being 2x () mana v.s. Path to Exile being 1x (), (which helps against Ulamog, the Ceaseless Hunger/Wurmcoil Engine and T1 Hollow One. Sure Terminate does not grant a potential land ramp, but Path to Exile is one less and is more likely to service Young Pyromancer and Bedlam Reveler at a more effective cmc/token/Bedlam ramp enabler.

On another note - I do not denounce Blood Moon in this shell. However, I am feeling that Path to Exile is strictly better than Terminate, and Lingering Souls is already including , so why hinder the true capabilities? Blood Moon is effective against a plethora of decks in Modern, but at the moment - would it not serve better to be sideboard material against the decks where it counts?

-One may even argue that Path to Exile denies Gideon and combats Dredge more effectively (when relevant).

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