Uril, the Miststalker

Uril, the Miststalker

Legendary Creature — Beast

Hexproof (This creature can't be the target of spells or abilities your opponents control)

Uril gets +2/+2 for each Aura attached to it.

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Set Rarity
Alara Reborn (ARB) Mythic Rare

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Legality

Format Legality
Limited Legal
1v1 Commander Legal
Block Constructed Legal
Highlander Legal
Modern Legal
Duel Commander Legal
2019-10-04 Legal
Legacy Legal
Leviathan Legal
Vintage Legal
Unformat Legal
Tiny Leaders Legal
Oathbreaker Legal
Canadian Highlander Legal
Casual Legal
Commander / EDH Legal

Uril, the Miststalker Discussion

StopShot on Counteracting large hexproof creatures.

1 week ago

The subject of this thread revolves around dealing with and counteracting against the commanders: Uril, the Miststalker, Sigarda, Host of Herons, Dragonlord Ojutai, Lazav, Dimir Mastermind, Thrun, the Last Troll as well as commanders that consistently or typically give themselves hexproof through various equipments/auras.

While it may not be the most prevalent strategy these types of commanders can be annoying to deal with. I'd like to create a discussion on what are the best ways to deal with these commanders. Given how niche these commanders can be, running cards that exclusively dedicate themselves to their removal may be detrimental to draw into when playing a game where none of your opponents run them. Therefore cards that can both combat massive hexproof creatures as well as still being useful to have if none of your opponents are playing with big hexproof creatures should be taken into consideration when deciding what is the "best" or "most practical" solution to combating hexproof strategies.

The first cards that come to mind are Arcane Lighthouse, Detection Tower, Bonds of Mortality, Shadowspear and Glaring Spotlight. These cards entirely dedicate themselves to combating hexproof strategies, and while this may be a detriment when used against non-hexproof strategies, these cards do lend themselves some extra utility. Arcane Lighthouse and Detection Tower can be seeded into your manabase so at worst they're just a Wastes however they can be more inefficient in comparison. Given that both are lands, tapping them costs you an extra mana resource effectively making their abilities cost to activate. Not only that, but they have no effect at stripping indestructible which can be a common keyboard which may be used alongside most hexproof strategies. Cards like Bonds of Mortality and Shadowspear cost only one to activate and they can bypass indestructible, however given they're not lands you have to dedicate a nonland slot in your deck to accommodate either of them which means taking out a card that may better synergize with your deck's main strategy in their place. They also lend themselves targets for counter spells and given hexproof decks contain white and/or green, artifact/enchantment removal will pose a high potential risk. This is all not to mention you still need to provide a removal spell in tandem with these cards in order to remove the threat.

Another solution is board wipes. Cards such as Wrath of God, Damnation, Day of Judgment, Supreme Verdict, Blasphemous Act, etc. Mass creature removal is incredibly strong given that its always relevant in most metas making it a highly flexible solution that isn't too narrow to rely upon. It's biggest drawback however is if the massive hexproof creature that needs to be dealt with has indestructible, totem armor or Gift of Immortality. Even a card such as Toxic Deluge can be a risk as you may have to pay a huge amount of life if the creature is incredibly big. Cyclonic Rift is another effective card. One thing to note about boardwipes are they affect the whole table which makes them also more likelier to be countered than by effects that impact a single individual.

A more narrow solution would be through damage prevention effects such as Story Circle, Forcefield, Runed Halo, Rune of Protection: White, etc. Given each card never "targets" they can be used to infinitely "Fog" a problem creature that you can't put up with. These effects are more narrow than boardwipes but broader than hexproof removal. Cards like these still run into problems with artifact/enchantment removal and they don't run enticing side effects such as drawing a card upon entering the battlefield like Bonds of Mortality or giving a creature lifelink and trample like Shadowspear, however you won't need to exhaust your removal spells to keep the large creature(s) either. In more broader metas such as combo, stax and prison, these effects may not be as useful however. More broader variants of these protection cards exist as Ensnaring Bridge, Divine Presence, Peacekeeper and Meekstone though these cards may make multiple opponents unhappy enough to remove them than the more narrower options.

The last effect used to combat large hexproof creatures is sacrifice effects such as: Fleshbag Marauder, Innocent Blood, Vona's Hunger, Liliana's Triumph, Doomfall etc. These effects can bypass not only hexproof but also indestructible, regenerate and totem armor. Their drawback lies in if the player with the large hexproof creature has any other creatures to sacrifice in their place. Because of this caveat this effect isn't too strong unless ran in multiples which can be difficult to commit to in a 100-card format. Instead selective sacrifice effects may be the best way to devote to this solution with cards like: Crackling Doom, Soul Shatter, Slaughter the Strong, Council's Judgment, Renounce the Guilds and Wing Shards. While these cards won't always guarantee the large hexproof creature will be removed, they provide a stronger case than not compared to most traditional sacrifice removal.

Lastly there are counter spells to remove hexproof creatures. While they may be the best all purpose solution they can be rendered ineffective if a Cavern of Souls or some other can not be countered effect is in place. With exception to Withering Boon, the biggest downside to counter spells are they are entirely exclusive to blue meaning other color combinations without blue do not have this option available.

Which method do you rely on to stop massive hexproof creatures? Is there a card or solution set not listed here that you use? If you happen to play EDH decks with big massive hexproof creatures, which effects annoy/counter you the most?

DemonDragonJ on Commander Legends Spoilers

3 weeks ago

I also would like to see Godsire, Cromat, Uril, the Miststalker and Meglonoth reprinted, since none of those cards have ever been reprinted.

StopShot on What are the top two …

1 month ago

I can see the merits of running Rune of Protection: Red but I feel like the second best or stronger is Rune of Protection: White. Prevention of damage can bypass shroud and hexproof creatures and white specializes in Lightning Greaves//Swiftfoot Boots and tutoring those cards with Steelshaper's Gift, Stoneforge Mystic, Open the Armory, etc. which Rune of Protection: White heavily turns off a lot of voltron-style decks. It's also incredible at turning off a lot of other hard to remove EDH generals such as Avacyn, Angel of Hope, Zetalpa, Primal Dawn, Akroma, Angel of Wrath, Bruna, Light of Alabaster, Sigarda, Host of Herons, Zur the Enchanter, Uril, the Miststalker, Narset, Enlightened Master and Zurgo Helmsmasher. Those generals may be more niche of a damage source than red or green, but that's where the cycling is helpful whereas spot removal can be more effective at dealing with the red and green damage sources.

Rune of Protection: Green I think may be a bit over-valued as the color green I think is a little too good at artifact/enchantment removal, especially when it comes to stapling that effect on their own creatures such as Acidic Slime, Bane of Progress, Caustic Caterpillar, Gemrazer, Reclamation Sage, Sawtusk Demolisher, Trygon Predator, Terastodon, Woodfall Primus. I feel like green could easily remove the rune before you could get much value out of it and that you'd be better off sticking to spot removal. I know white also has enchantment removal but their removal spells I find to be less practical and as efficient as green meaning you wouldn't find as much enchantment removal in a white deck as you would a green deck.

TonyStark9001 on The Crown Scourge

2 months ago

Omniscience_is_life you would need to dedicate a significant portion of the deck to protection effects and counterspells, and then also be willing to keep mana up for it every turn. its just so much more space and mana efficient to use a commander with hexproof. and with the existence of "commander damage", Uril, the Miststalker is strictly the best voltron commander. slap on some auras with any sort of evasion and then just punch people in the mouth until someone is forced to play a board wipe.

Sultai_Sir on Uril, the Miststalker: Aurastorm [[PRIMER]]

3 months ago

Wow, that card sounds great! Now I don't have to feel embarrassed whenever I call this deck a storm deck. It also synergizes with a lifelinking Uril, the Miststalker, which often gains me 50-250 life per swing. I'll be looking for a card to cut for that. Thank you so much!

DemonDragonJ on Double Masters

3 months ago

I would like to see Godsire, Meglonoth, and Uril, the Miststalker reprinted in this set, since none of them have ever been reprinted, before.

dbpunk, most of the cards that have been revealed, thus far, are excellent cards that need further reprints to keep them affordable, so I would not dismiss this set as a "cash grab" (but I do fully agree that the Secret Lairs are definitely cash grabs).

Game_of_Cones on Synonyms/Nicknames System for Deckbuilding and …

4 months ago

Uril, the Miststalker: I call him “Speedo” aka “Mister Earl”

ChickenBoy13 on Uril, The Miststalker

4 months ago

Just look at the auras , and choose the ones you like.

I'm upvoting because it's an Uril, the Miststalker deck.

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