Root Maze

Root Maze

Enchantment

Artifacts and lands come into play tapped.

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Set Rarity
Tenth Edition (10E) Rare
Tempest (TMP) Rare

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Legality

Format Legality
Leviathan Legal
Unformat Legal
Block Constructed Legal
Vintage Legal
Oathbreaker Legal
Highlander Legal
Canadian Highlander Legal
Legacy Legal
Casual Legal
Commander / EDH Legal
Tiny Leaders Legal
Penny Dreadful Legal
Noble Legal
Duel Commander Legal
1v1 Commander Legal
Modern Legal
2019-10-04 Legal
Magic Duels Legal

Root Maze occurrence in decks from the last year

Commander / EDH:

All decks: 0.01%

Root Maze Discussion

dingusdingo on Lands choice

4 days ago

Check out https://mtg.gamepedia.com/Nonbasic_land as it lists all the non-basic lands for each color specifically. Some analysis of my own though:

Fetch lands

Polluted Delta and friends. Extremely useful for guaranteeing color access. The shuffle effect can generate extra value when you know what the top card is (especially Sensei's Divining Top and Brainstorm, but really any scry/reveal effect) by shuffling away cards you don't want. Generates huge color access when paired with Shocklands. The "pay 1 life" clause does add up, especially against decks like burn. Reusable from plenty of cards, and it also slightly thins the deck. Hosed by a few random effects like Aven Mindcensor or Leonin Arbiter that stop searches. Also hosed by Thalia, Heretic Cathar (and Root Maze if legacy/vintage) due to having two lands enter tapped instead of just one. A staple of any 2+ color deck, the positives far outweigh any negatives.

Shock lands

Overgrown Tomb and friends. Used in conjunction with fetchlands to guarantee color access. The 2 life to shock hurts, especially when fetched to make it 3. You can always crack fetches to grab shocks at the end of turn before yours, to have the shock enter tapped to save the 2 life. This allows you to keep mana open for instant speed response if you need it, while getting the reduced enter tapped cost if you don't need to respond to something. You generally want 1x of each shock for color access, and I personally think a 2:1 ratio is good for fetches:shocks. I will often start with 8:4 fetches:shocks for 2 or 3 color decks, and adjust as necessary from there.

Fast lands

Spirebluff Canal and friends. A nice dual land without land types that can guarantee color access fast and early. You generally should run 2-3 of these in a deck. Take note that you can play them untapped as the first, second, or third land. You like to see 1 or maybe 2 of these in a game, but don't like to draw them later. If drawn later in the game, entering tapped usually isn't nearly as big of a deal if the land entered tapped on turn 1/2/3. Extremely useful against decks like Burn or most aggro decks that seek to pressure your life total fast and early.

Check lands

Dragonskull Summit My favorite lands to use in conjunction with a fetch/shock package. They work extremely well with fetches and shocks, but do note that they will always enter tapped if it is your first land. A nice card to run, relatively efficient $$$-wise, but it doesn't play well with other non-basics such as the fastlands. These lands will also raise the percent of hands you need to mulligan with, as some otherwise playable 2 land hands will always make the checkland enter tapped (like if the other land is a fastland or other land without a basic type). Very efficient in 2 color decks, extremely efficient in 1 color dominant decks with a splash of another color for one card or sideboard reasons.

Filter lands

Cascade Bluffs and friends. Useful when you have extremely color heavy cards such as Kiki-Jiki, Mirror Breaker or other 3+ colored mana requirements. Hosed out by Damping Sphere. Worth noting that this will never make colored mana on turn 1, which slightly raises the amount of hands you will have to mulligan. A fine option for most decks, especially if you pulled one from a pack and have it available. You will see the most benefit from these in 3+ color decks.

Reveal lands

Port Town and friends. Similar to check lands, but they perform slightly differently. They can enter untapped on turn 1, which is a massive gain, but enter tapped if drawn later on after you've played your lands out from your hand. Doesn't work well with other non-basic lands outside of fetch/shocks. I personally skip these in favor of check lands, but if you notice too many turn 1 plays being broken by check lands, this may be the solution.

Battle lands

Prairie Stream and friends. Also known as tango lands. Useful in 2 color decks where you will see more basics. Can't recommend them too highly there either, but that is where can possibly see play. These have basic land types, so they can be grabbed with fetchlands, useful as an EOT play so you can untap with them normally. Really not very useful, hard to have them enter untapped. Still significantly better than almost every land that 100% enters tapped though, as it sometimes enters untapped and is fetchable.

Pain Lands

Always enters untapped, always guarantees color access. You can navigate around the 1 life on later turns by using it for instead of a color. Useful in decks that must have color access. A good budget replacement if you can't afford a fetch/shock mana base. This land will suffer against burn.

Horizon Lands

There are only 6 of these, all enemy colored except for Horizon Canopy, but spicy tech for sure. Useful in a deck like Burn that depletes its hand, or decks that use Life from the Loam to get repeat draws from the horizon lands.

multimedia on

2 months ago

Hey, nice budget hatebear version of Teeg.

Collector Ouphe, Stony Silence shut down a lot of decks by preventing fast artifact mana. You're not playing enough artifacts that these cards disrupt; will hurt your opponents much more. Blind Obedience, Root Maze and Rule of Law can really slow down your opponents. Maze affects you less because Teeg is two mana and lots of other hatebears/disruption are low CMC.

Ashnod's Altar + Kitchen Finks + Vizier of Remedies infinite combos aren't doing much in your deck. It's infinite colorless mana and life gain, but these are not going to win the game. What are using the colorless mana on as a win condition? Infinite life isn't a win in multiplayer Commander because an opponent can kill you with 21 Commander damage, infinite combo the entire table with damage or life lose, win by drawing a card with no cards in their library, etc.

Consider Luminarch Ascension and 4/4 Angels as a win condition? Ascension can activate fast in multiplayer Commander because it looks at each opponents end step and only needs four quest counters. When your opponents are disrupted it makes it much more difficult to make you lose life. Ascension is the kind of card that's excellent with Ghostly Prison, Blind Obedience, Rule of Law, Root Maze, Stony Silence since it's low CMC to cast/create repeatable Angels, you benefit from your opponents not able to attack you and it's an enchantment.

Ohran Frostfang can be repeatable source of drawing a lot of cards with attacking deathtouch hatebears. Good with flying hatebears and 4/4 Angels.Hushbringer is a better Tocatli Honor Guard since it also shuts down aristocrat Blood Artist strategies and it has flying. Containment Priest stops reanimation.

Dosan the Falling Leaf and Choke make blue control/spellslinger players cry. Scavenging Ooze is excellent repeatable graveyard hate. Drannith Magistrate, new card from Ikoria who prevents your opponents from casting their Commander from Command Zone or casting cards from their graveyard.


Cards to consider cutting:

  • Mana Geode
  • Immolating Glare
  • Encircling Fissure
  • Wall of Omens
  • Sunscape Familiar
  • Kitchen Finks
  • Vizier of Remedies
  • Ashnod's Altar
  • Cataclysmic Gearhulk
  • Elderwood Scion
  • Kithkin Spellduster
  • Archon of Valor's Reach

Good luck with your deck.

TOCMtG on Estrid EDH

3 months ago

I'd like to recommend a few cards:

  • Squeeze barely touches you, but can really put the screws to your opponents.
  • Stasis is by far one of the best enchantments in any Estrid deck like this and i'm kind of surprised it's not in this list. Winter Orb is a similar case.
  • Estrid's Invocation is both a copy enchantment and a decent draw engine and it should probably find a place in your deck.
  • Root Maze is another good way to slow down your opponents.

Also, you have Heliod, Sun-Crowned listed twice here.

Servbot40 on Tuvasa Enchantress

3 months ago

GucciJesus - This deck seems like a good start but it does have a few glaring weaknesses. From what I can tell you only have 9 instances of ramp with a fairly high average CMC, Two enchantress cards not including your general and no clear game plan. Tuvasa is a fairly versatile commander with strong theming that draws her to have you jam every enchantment into a deck and roll with it. This will work in most low power metagames and feel strong as you will likely have few opponents with decks built to handle enchantments and the extra draw every turn will put you ahead in most cases. However, the lake of a true plan to win the game will, feel like a slog when you get to the last few moments of the game, where you just keep casting Tuvasa hoping she will stick so you can 21 someone, only to have her removed before combat.

This is where a focused game plan can help breath new life into your deck. Typically Tuvasa has two clear options: Pillow Fort Enchantress or Voltron Enchantress.

Enchantress Decks typically try to turbo out a bunch of cheap enchantments to eventually win with overwhelming card and some win-con.

The pillow fort variety will usually puts up a wall of enchantments (Sphere of Safety, Propaganda, Elephant Grass) to prevent your opponents from hurting you while you play cheap and useful enchantments (Root Maze, Sterling Grove, Blind Obedience) with various enchantresses (Enchantress's Presence, Satyr Enchanter, Verduran Enchantress, Nessian Wanderer) to draw to a win-con (Opalescence, Starfield of Nyx)

Voltron attempts to win with a large Tuvasa, which appears to be the route that the Precon was built for. The issue is it seems you have no true protection from your commander. But Tuvasa is unique to other enchantment based voltron commanders in that she gets big with regular enchantments rather than aura's. Cards like Asceticism, Privileged Position can protect her, and cards like Levitation can help her get in for damage. The cheap and useful enchantments (Root Maze, Sterling Grove, Blind Obedience), various enchantresses (Enchantress's Presence, Satyr Enchanter, Verduran Enchantress, Nessian Wanderer) still apply here.

Finally the ramp situation, if you are in a metagame that has limited mass enchantment removal (most) and shy's away from land destruction, then you should look to land aura's that ramp like Utopia Sprawl, give you extra land drops like Exploration or are just powerful like Carpet of Flowers. A good ration is around 10 to 12 ramp spells.

One final note while Sol Ring is a powerful card in most situations, it isn't necessarily better than the previously mentioned ramp spells, as they accelerate your game plan (buffing Tuvasa, draw you more cards) and can ramp you into Tuvasa, 3 things Sol Ring is not good for. I usually drop it from most of my decks where the commander doesn't have any colorless mana in their cost as its usually a dead draw in my opening hand and causes political problems.

dingusdingo on Dockside Extortionist Loops

4 months ago

Good afternoon to all the lovely folks of TappedOut (except the guy who advocates playing Doomsday and passing). On today's thread, lets discuss Dockside Extortionist loops.

As some of you may be aware, the combo of Dockside Extortionist is used alongside Temur Sabertooth to generate infinite mana, usually in 4 or 5 color shells with a commander as an outlet for winning. The gist of the loop is to create 5 Treasure tokens from Dockside, then use 4 of the tokens to bounce and replay Dockside from the Sabertooth.

This combo has been covered in a few places before, but I keep seeing it! So lets dive into why I personally think this combo should be avoided.

1. Players can scoop

The single biggest reason not to run this combo for winning.

  • 104.3a A player can concede the game at any time. A player who concedes leaves the game immediately. That player loses the game.

Conceding is an action that doesn't use the stack, and can immediately stop your combo from executing. Imagine a scenario in which you have 3 opponents, with 5 artifacts/enchantments split among them with a 2/2/1 split (so two opponents have 2 and one opponent has 1). With Sabertooth on the board, you play Dockside to start your loop. An opponent who is knowledgeable of the combo with 2 artifacts/enchantments decides to scoop. Now, instead of winning, your combo is going to be mana negative and no longer works.

But Dingus isn't that unsportsmanlike?

Ethics aside, scooping at will is an action other players can take. Relying on your opponents to act in good faith is a losing strategy. Also consider that there are quite a large number of spiteful players, a problem exacerbated by losing. I can think of more than one game I've seen someone revel in their role of playing Kingmaker (deciding who wins after they lose)

2. Dockside relies on opponent's board state

Relying on your opponent's having a certain board state to execute your combo makes it much more fragile. Even if you're holding both A + B of your combo, having to wait until your opponent's assemble a certain board state means you may end up losing with both pieces available for use.

Also: artifact/enchantment removal in response to the trigger is another vulnerability for this combo. Seeing 5 qualified permanents on the board and having one or two removed puts you under the threshold.

3. Treasure tokens require a tap and activation, and an ETB to be created

Much more minor than the other points, but still a reason. ETB tapped cards see play, especially Root Maze Blind Obedience and Manglehorn. There are a handful of other ones too, like Kismet which are more niche. There are also cards that stop artifact activations, namely Stony Silence and Null Rod but also Karn, the Great Creator. The effects that turn off ETB triggers, namely Hushbringer Hushwing Gryff and Torpor Orb all stop this combo as well.

Counterpoint: Both pieces have high enough independent quality to be worth running

Dockside Extortionist is treated for the most part like a red ritual. Temur Sabertooth has lots of application for resetting valuable ETB effects or saving creatures from removal. A large argument for running this combo is that many decks would want to run both of these cards anyways, and slot efficiency is saved by relying on it for a combo.

I acknowledge this, but wholeheartedly believe that Dockside is much weaker than people realize. Most importantly, the two biggest decks to consider in the EDH meta currently are skewed more towards creatures than artifacts in terms of mana ramp. While these decks do indeed pack artifacts and enchantments, they aren't as prevalent as creatures. Furthermore, the biggest combos in the format currently with Flash Hulk and Fish Consultation don't run artifacts or enchantments, and are cost effective enough where the pilot doesn't need to build a massive rock board state to execute the combo.

Discussion

Do you consider this to be a viable combo for winning? Despite my opinion, I'm certainly interested in gathering more information or perspectives on the combo.

Inkmoth on Nylea, Shoot for the Stars (cEDH)

6 months ago

GrizzlyAtom: Just wanted to say that I absolutely loved the list! Safe to say you hit the nail on the head on almost all of your choices. However, I do highly recommend you make a couple of changes for the general consistency of the deck.

These won't be direct swaps to the cuts and more of a series of cards that you should highly consider as I don't want to cramp your style.

I hope this helps, I love the deck, will be keeping up with it. Final recommendation would be to use a similar categorization that I used in Yeva for your list as it helps you visualize your deck based off function and see where it is lacking.

Rabid_Wombat on LGS has a Problem Player...what ...

6 months ago

We have got this guy at my locals who insists on only playing Tamanoa every...single...game (which is not even a legal Commander for fricks sake).

That in itself would not really be a problem but his deck is Stax on steroids - packed full of Winter Orb , Root Maze , Stranglehold , Blind Obedience etc... you get the idea.

His wincon is to lock down everyone then play damage dealing effects like Ankh of Mishra , Manabarbs , Citadel of Pain and a whole heap of others then gain tons of life.

If anyone attacks him he whines and says "Why do you keep targeting me?!?" I flat out said to him: "Dude, you are fking my sh*t up - that's why."

How can I tell him, in the nicest way possible, that his deck sucks ass and I refuse to play against it ever again?

Profet93 on Ctrl-G | The Art of Mono Green Control

6 months ago

Ender666666

Curio > Fountain because of all of the shenanigans

Winter Orb is a great idea, synergy with Null Rod and Root Maze

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