Silence

Legality

Format Legality
Modern Legal
Legacy Legal
Vintage Legal
Commander / EDH Legal
Duel Commander Legal
Tiny Leaders Legal

Printings View all

Set Rarity
Magic 2014 Rare
2011 Core Set Rare
2010 Core Set Rare

Combos Browse all

Silence

Instant

Your opponents can't cast spells this turn. (Spells cast before this resolves are unaffected.)

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Silence Discussion

xyr0s on Project Weapons

1 day ago

Silence deals with counterspells. You play when you want to combo - like, when you have a puresteel paladin in your hand, some cheap equipment, and a silence. Silence goes first, if that is not countered, you have peace and quiet for the rest of the turn. However, Silence does nothing against removal - if you cast it after the removal is cast, it's still on the stack, and when you cast silence, your opponent gets to respond with instant-speed spells anyway.

Gods Willing should be protection enough from spot removal, like Path to Exile and Fatal Push. But you could add a couple of Apostle's Blessing, if you're really, badly afraid of removal.

Teufell on Project Weapons

1 day ago

I see, Silence seems better against removals, but Il'l have to time it just right. I was looking for ways to deal with Path to Exile, Murder, aggro and counters. I think those would be the main enemies of this deck.

xyr0s on Project Weapons

1 day ago

I don't think that will work quite the way you imagine it. the problem being, that Sundial of the Infinite actually ends the turn. So, if you use it in response to a counterspell, you exile the counterspell... and the spell, it was trying to counter. And end the turn, so you don't get to play any further spells until it's your turn again.

Better yet (for your opponent): It turns their Lightning Bolts into timewalk. And having seen you end turn as response to removal, you'll be catching removal during your next upkeep (if your opponent is reasonably smart). Then what? Lose the creature? that's fine, you just drew a useless SB-card (good for opponent) OR Lose the turn? oh well, opponent just lost a removal spell. But he's probably okay with that, as you just gave him the turn, and you didn't even get to draw a card.

I think you'd rather play Silence in your SB. So when you have an explosive turn of playing all the equipment, you start by playing Silence, and when that has resolved, you get to do all the other things you want to.

TheDuggernaught on WBU Modern Control

6 days ago

Since Isochron Scepter can only imprint spells with a cmc of 2 or less, it can be hard to consistently generate value out of it if you have a lot of spells outside that range. It is akin to playing Delver of Secrets  Flip. Delver is obviously wants a lot of instants and sorceries in a similar vein as Isochron Scepter likes instants at or below 2 cmc. If you do not hit those instants and sorceries for delver, it does not do anything of note and would be better substituted with another card. However, it is good when it does hit an instant or sorcery, so Delver decks usually play around 30 instants and sorceries so they can hit them consistently. Isochron Scepter is the same in that if you do not build around it, it can be very meh as you dig through your deck to find a card it can actually use -- and even then, it might not be an optimal choice (oh goody... a Mana Leak when we are on turn 6...). Scepter is not a card like Kitchen Finks where you can just throw it in any old deck playing green or white and have it be a good inclusion. It is a card that requires some build around to be effective. Cards like Dawn Charm, Remand (which you have already), Silence (which you have already), Funeral Charm, Muddle the Mixture, Path to Exile, Hindering Light, Beckcall (can you cast the call side because beck only costs 2 -- allowing you to imprint the entire card), and Hallowed Moonlight (awesome sideboard tech vs dredge and merfolk), are solid on your colors. Although if you want to focus on scepter, then I might suggest making a switch to Jeskai ().

As for your other options, there are two main types of control if you want to scrap the scepters. There is Draw-Go -- which is probably the best Esper ) control shell and Tap Out. Draw-Go is very reactive and will almost always draw a card for turn, play a land, and pass the turn -- playing almost all fo its cards on its opponent's turn in response to whatever they do. Tap Out control is more proactive and looks to keep the board clean until it can start landing threats in the midgame and then keep them safe with counterspells.

Sogatog on Renewed Enduring Renewal

1 week ago

Silence is already in the board to stop blue decks. Adding Isochron Scepter is a cool lock, but it would be essentially a second combo with less redundancy and no tutors, which id have to take out discard for, so I feel like it would reduce consistency. Not sure this is the deck for that.

the.beanpole on Why does spell recursion self ...

1 week ago

My personal opinion is:

That would lend itself to multiple copies being able to recur themselves. Playing the literal same card over and over is likely seen as a "unfun" thing by Wizards. Looping infinitely in that manner doesn't seem necessarily powerful (apart from things like Kolaghan's Command+Snapcaster Mage that are particularly powerful even on their own), but is likely very annoying for newer players.

Also, some of them are inherently abusable in specific circumstances. Example: Pull from the Deep in an opponent's 'yard. They cast Silence on your upkeep. Their turn, they cast another Pull from the Deep, targeting the first one and Silence. Now you are locked out of playing sorcery-speed spells for the rest of the game. Again, not incredibly powerful (there are a number of combos that currently do exactly this) but it leads to "unfun" game-states that require little effort to set-up, and are difficult to disrupt without specific and dedicated hate cards (Rest in Peace, Leyline of the Void, etc.)

It also seems like a safety check for Wizards. The graveyard is likely the most abusable resource in the game, and that leads to a high likelihood that someone finds something super-broken one day that Wizards missed in design/development.

TL;DR

Graveyard is inherently abusable. It is "unfun" to many.

Kjartan on I'm sorry, Dave. I'm afraid you can't do that.

2 weeks ago

Deathbend When you cast Silence, you trade a card, and your opponent doesn't.

When you cast, let's say Mana Leak, you trade a card, and your opponent does too (if he can't pay for it that is.)

So Mana Leak is a 1 for 1, whilst Silence is a 0 for 1's.

That is not to say Silence is a bad card. It's quite good in combo decks where its effect can be game winning the turn you're going off.

But in a control deck, you generally want everything you do to be at least a 1 for 1, with some of your cards being 2+ for 1's.

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