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Mr. Smith Goes to Ravnica

Modern

Caerwyn


Mr. Smith Goes to Ravnica; or A Comprehensive Primer on the use of Azor's Elocutors in the Modern Format of the Magic: the Gathering Trading Card Game.

Well, I guess the gentlemen are in a pretty tall hurry to get me out of here. The way the evidence has piled up against me, I can't say I blame them much. And I'm quite willing to go, sir, when they vote it that way - but before that happens I've got a few things I want to say to this body. I tried to say them once before, and I got stopped colder than a mackerel. Well, I'd like to get them said this time, sir. And as a matter of fact, I'm not going to leave this body until I do get them said.

  • Jefferson Smith, Mr. Smith Goes to Washington

I am a fan of both defensive Magic and alternate win conditions, so it comes as no surprise that I find Azor's Elocutors an interesting card. This deck is designed to feel as if it were filibustering. Beyond Nykthos, Shrine to Nyx, there is no card ramp. There is no card draw. There are no proliferate mechanics. There simply is turn after grueling turn of non-interactive, low-excitement play.

Needless to say, I find this one of the more enjoyable decks I have designed.

While playing, it is recommended that your stand and read this primer out loud. If you stop talking or have to sit down, you should concede defeat. You may, of course, yield the floor to your opponent for the exclusive purpose of their asking a question.

The goal of this deck is to win through either Azor's Elocutors or Approach of the Second Sun. To this end, the deck constructs a prison, preventing your opponents from casting spells or attacking. This buys you a sufficient number of turns to win through these rather ineffective methods.

The cards of the deck are explained in more detail below. To summarize cards such as Nevermore and Meddling Mage are used to lock down your opponents, preventing them from casting spells. Telepathy further aids in this plan, letting you know threats before you opponent can cast them. Ghostly Prison and Ensnaring Bridge prevent enemy creatures from attacking, and Leyline of Security gives protection against burn. Runed Halo and Detention Sphere are mostly used to neuter threats that have made it into play, though Runed Halo can be used against burn as well.

Magic: the Gathering is a trading card game published by Wizards of the Coast and created by Richard Garfield. Originally released in 1993, the game has received numerous expansions and additions. It currently is the world's most popular trading card game.

Players construct decks built of magic cards. The minimum deck sizes are 40 cards for limited formats, 60 cards for standard constructed formats, and 100 cards for commander. This deck is in the Modern format--one of the constructed formats. Modern consists of cards introduced since the Mirroden block, with the exception of cards that have been banned. A deck must contain a minimum of sixty cards, though the size itself is unlimited. A deck may also have fifteen cards in its sideboard. A deck may contain no more than four of any given card, with the exception of basic lands (Swamps, Islands, Mountains, Plains, Forests, and Wastes) or cards with rules specifically stating more than four may be in a deck (such as Shadowborn Apostle). Players start with 20 lifepoints, and, in general, lose the game when they reach 0 life (again, there are exceptions, such as Phyrexian Unlife). At the beginning of the game, players decide who goes first. Then players draw 7 cards from their deck, and decide if they will keep their hand or mulligan. When a player mulligans, they draw one fewer card. If a player has taken one or more mulligans, they get to scry 1 at the beginning of their turn. In two player games, the player who goes first does not draw a card during their draw step, while the second player does. In multiplayer games, everyone draws during their draw step.

Players use lands and other mana sources, such as Black Lotus, to cast their spells. These spells contain a number of different effects, either becoming permanents (creatures, artifacts, enchantments, and planeswalkers), which remain on the battlefield, or which are sent to the graveyard upon use (instants and sorceries). Through the use of these cards, players seek to win the game--either by reducing the opponent to 0 life, or winning through an alternate win condition (such as Azor's Elocutors).

Each turn has a set order of phases, which contain supcomponents called steps. The phases and steps are, in order, as follows:

The Beginning Phase

  • Untap Step - All permanents the active player controls with phasing simultaneously phase in or out; the active player chooses which permanents, if any, to untap. The nonactive player cannot play spells during this phase.

  • Upkeep Step - All upkeep costs are played, and any abilities which trigger on a player's upkeep go on the stack.

  • Draw Step - The player draws a card, and any abilities which trigger on a player's draw step go on the stack.

Pre-Combat Main Phase

  • Abilities that trigger at the beginning of the main phase go onto the stack.
  • The active player has priority.
  • The active player may cast any sorcery-speed spells, namely sorceries and permanents lacking flash or another ability which allows them to be cast at any time (for example: Derevi, Empyrial Tactician).

Combat Phase

  • Beginning of Combat Step - The active player declares defending players, and gains priority.

  • Declare Attackers Step - The active player chooses which creatures he or she wishes to attack with, and declares them as attackers. Creatures without vigilance that are declared as attackers become tapped. Effects which trigger "whenever this creature attacks" are put onto the stack.

  • Declare blockers Step - The defending player chooses which creatures he or she will use to block creatures attacking him or her, or a planeswalker he or she controls (except in rare instances, such as if Odric, Master Tactician's ability was triggered). There are numerous restrictions on blocking, further defined by keywords. For example, a creature with Horsemenship can only be blocked by another creature with Horsemenship.

  • First Strike or Double Strike Combat Damage Step - If a creature with first strike or double strike is in play, there is an additional Combat Damage Step that occurs before the primary Combat Damage Step. Only creatures with First or Double Strike deal damage during this step. Please see the Combat Damage Step rules below.

  • Combat Damage Step - Creatures simultaneously deal damage to their targets or to a creature blocking them. If a creature was blocked, that creature does not deal damage to the player or planeswalker it attacked, unless it has trample. This applies even if the blocking creature was removed from the battlefield before the Combat Damage Step. Generally, the creature's controller determines how damage is divided. For example, if a 5/5 is blocked by a 1/1, a 1/1, and a 1/6, the attacking creature's controller may choose to divide his or her creature's five damage such that it deals 1 damage to each of the 1/1s, and the remaining 3 damage to the 1/6. A creature with trample must deal lethal damage to all creatures blocking it before it may assign excess damage to the attacked player or planeswalker. A notable exception to this rule--if a creature with banding is in the combat, the player who controls the creature with banding may assign damage for their opponent. On the offense, if a 1/1 is banded to a 5/5, and is blocked by a 10/10, the attacking player may choose to assign all 10 points of the blocking creature to the 1/1, allowing the 5/5 to survive. On defense, if a defending player blocks a 10/10 with trample using their 1/1 with banding, the defending player may assign all 10 points of damage to the 1/1, preventing any damage, despite the creature's having trample.

  • Last Strike Combat Damage Step - Similar to the First and Double Strike Combat Damage Step, but only applicable to creatures with Last Strike (a mechanic, which, at the time of writing, is only found in the Un-Set Unstable).

  • End of Combat Step - Abilities that trigger at the end of combat step go on the stack, and all creatures and planeswalkers are removed from combat.

Post-Combat Main Phase See Pre-Combat Main Phase Above.

The game is governed by a comprehensive set of rules, published by Wizards of the Coast. The comprehensive rules are extensive, but the relevant parts will be cited as necessary.

Creatures are a type of permanent found in Magic: the Gathering. Creatures are governed by Rule 302, which has been reproduced below.

302.1. A player who has priority may cast a creature card from his or her hand during a main phase of his or her turn when the stack is empty. Casting a creature as a spell uses the stack. (See rule 601, “Casting Spells.”)

302.2 When a creature spell resolves, its controller puts it onto the battlefield under his or her control.

302.3 Creature subtypes are always a single word and are listed after a long dash: “Creature — Human Soldier,” “Artifact Creature — Golem,” and so on. Creature subtypes are also called creature types. Creatures may have multiple subtypes. See rule 205.3m for the complete list of creature types. Example: “Creature — Goblin Wizard” means the card is a creature with the subtypes Goblin and Wizard.

302.4 Power and toughness are characteristics only creatures have.

302.4a A creature’s power is the amount of damage it deals in combat.

302.4b A creature’s toughness is the amount of damage needed to destroy it.

302.4c To determine a creature’s power and toughness, start with the numbers printed in its lower right corner, then apply any applicable continuous effects. (See rule 613, “Interaction of Continuous Effects.”)

302.5. Creatures can attack and block. (See rule 508, “Declare Attackers Step,” and rule 509, “Declare Blockers Step.”)

302.6. A creature’s activated ability with the tap symbol or the untap symbol in its activation cost can’t be activated unless the creature has been under its controller’s control continuously since his or her most recent turn began. A creature can’t attack unless it has been under its controller’s control continuously since his or her most recent turn began. This rule is informally called the “summoning sickness” rule.

302.7. Damage dealt to a creature by a source with neither wither nor infect is marked on that creature (see rule 119.3). If the total damage marked on that creature is greater than or equal to its toughness, that creature has been dealt lethal damage and is destroyed as a state-based action (see rule 704). All damage marked on a creature is removed when it regenerates (see rule 701.12, “Regenerate”) and during the cleanup step (see rule 514.2).

Azor's Elcutors is one of the two primary win conditions for this deck, the second being Approach of the Second Sun. Information regarding Approach of the Second Sun can be found in Section 7.01: Approach of the Second Sun herein.

Azor's Elcutors costs a total of five (5) mana to cast. Three () of these mana can be generic mana, as defined by Rule 107.4b (Numeral symbols (such as ) and variable symbols (such as ) represent generic mana in costs. Generic mana in costs can be paid with any type of mana. For more information about , see rule 107.3). The two remaining mana required to cast Azor's Elcutors are coloured mana symbols, defined by Rule 107. (The mana symbols are , , , , , and ; the numerals , , , , , and so on; the hybrid symbols , , , , , , , , , and ; the monocolored hybrid symbols , , , , and ; the Phyrexian mana symbols , , , , and ; and the snow symbol ). Specifically, they are hybrid mana, and thus mana of either colour can be used to satisfy that mana requirement, pursuant to rule 107.4c (Hybrid mana symbols are also colored mana symbols. Each one represents a cost that can be paid in one of two ways, as represented by the two halves of the symbol. A hybrid symbol such as can be paid with either white or blue mana, and a monocolored hybrid symbol such as can be paid with either one black mana or two mana of any type. A hybrid mana symbol is all of its component colors. Example: can be paid by spending , , or ). Either Blue or White mana can be used to satisfy the coloured mana requirement for Azor's Elocutors. This gives Azor's Elocutors a converted mana cost of five, pursuant to Rule 202.3 (The converted mana cost of an object is a number equal to the total amount of mana in its mana cost, regardless of color. Example: A mana cost of translates to a converted mana cost of 5).

Azor's Elocutors is a creature, a term that is defined by Rule 302. It has a power of three (3), and a toughness of five (5). The full text of Rule 302, including all relevant subsections, can be found in Section 3: Creatures, herein.

The rules text for Azor's Eloctors states as follows:

At the beginning of your upkeep, put a filibuster counter on Azor's Elocutors. Then if Azor's Elocutors has five or more filibuster counters on it, you win the game.Whenever a source deals damage to you, remove a filibuster counter from Azor's Elocutors.

Per the cards' rules text, at the beginning of your upkeep, you put a filibuster counter on Azor's Elocutors. The upkeep step is defined by Rule 503. Specifically at issue is Rule 503.1 (First, any abilities that trigger at the beginning of the upkeep step and any abilities that triggered during the turn’s untap step go on the stack. (See rule 603, “Handling Triggered Abilities.”)). Counters are defined by Rule 121.1 ( A counter is a marker placed on an object or player that modifies its characteristics and/or interacts with a rule, ability, or effect. Counters are not objects and have no characteristics. Notably, a counter is not a token, and a token is not a counter. Counters with the same name or description are interchangeable.). Counters are placed on permenants in accordance with Rule 121.6 ( If a spell or ability refers to a counter being “placed” on a permanent, it means putting a counter on that permanent while it’s on the battlefield, or that permanent entering the battlefield with a counter on it as the result of an effect (see rule 614.1c).)

The following rulings have been made regarding Azor's Elocutors:

October 1, 2012: You’ll only win the game if Azor’s Elocutors has five or more filibuster counters on it when the first ability resolves. For example, if Azor’s Elocutors has four filibuster counters on it and you somehow add another during your main phase, you won’t win the game immediately.

October 1, 2012: The second ability of Azor’s Elocutors removes one filibuster counter per source, no matter how much damage that source dealt. For example, if two attacking creatures deal damage to you at the same time, two filibuster counters will be removed.

Azor's Elocutors' creature type is Human Advisor. It was released with the set Return to Ravnica, the first set in the REturn to Ravnica Block, and the 59th Magic: the Gathering expansion. This set was released on October 5, 2012, and contained 274 cards. Azor's Elocutors has a rarity of "Rare." It has a Card Number of 210, and the art was done by Johannes Voss. It has the Azorius watermark.

Azor's Eloctors is, at the time of writing, the only card in the game to use filibuster counters. The word filibuster is defined by the Oxford English Dictionary as "Noun - An act of obstruction in a legislative assembly. Chiefly U.S. The procedures of the Senate of the United States of America allow for filibustering. A Senator, may hold the floor (i.e. be recognized to speak) for as long as they wish. Filibustering, in American jurisprudence, involves holding the floor for as long as possible, often in protest of legislation, or as one's political party seeks to obtain the requisite votes or present members to win a particular vote. Senator Strom Thurmond (Democrat-South Carolina at the time, though he joined the Republican Party in 1964) currently holds the record for the longest filibuster. In protest of the Civil Rights Act of 1957, he spoke for twenty-four (24) hours and eighteen (18) minutes. In the well-regarded 1939 film, Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, directed by Frank Capra, and staring Brigadier General James Stewart, depicts a factious senator, Jefferson Smith, who is falsely accused of wrongdoing after he upsets an entrenched political machine. He filibusters for approximately twenty-four hours to stall a vote on his removal from office, buying sufficient time for his innocence to be proven. It was nominated for ten (10) Academy Awards, and won Lewis R. Foster the Academy Award for Best Writing, Original Story. The name of this deck is a reference to this film.

Meddling Mage is one of the control spells used in this deck, and is used to deny opponents the ability to cast their spells. This is a similar effect to Nevermore. Information regarding Nevermore can be found in Section 5.05: Nevermore herein.

Meddling Mage costs a total of two (2) mana to cast. Both mana required to cast Meddling Mage are coloured mana symboles, defined by Rule 107. The full text of Rule 107 has been reproduced in Section 3.01: Azor's Elocutors herein. One (1) White mana, and one (1) Blue mana are required for casting Meddling Mage. This gives Meddling Mage a converted mana cost of two (2), pursuant to Rule 202.3. The full text of Rule 202.3 has been reproduced in Section 3.01: Azor's Elocutors herein.

Meddling Mage is a creature, a term that is defined by Rule 302. It has a power of three (3), and a toughness of five (5). The full text of Rule 302, including all relevant subsections, can be found in Section 3: Creatures, herein.

The rules text for Meddling Mage states as follows:

As Meddling Mage enters the battlefield, choose a nonland card name. Spells with the chosen name can't be cast.

This is a slight difference from the rules printed on the card. The original rules text reads: As Meddling Mage comes into play, name a nonland card. The named card can't be played. This card received errata for the sake of consistency in Magic: the Gathering.

The following rulings have been made regarding Meddling Mage:

May 1, 2009: No one can cast spells or activate abilities between the time a card is named and the time that Meddling Mage’s ability starts to work.

May 1, 2009: Spells with the chosen name that somehow happen to already be on the stack when Meddling Mage enters the battlefield are not affected by Meddling Mage’s ability.

May 1, 2009: Although the named card can’t be cast, it can still be put onto the battlefield by a spell or ability (if it’s a permanent card).

May 1, 2009: You can name either half of a split card, but not both. If you do so, that half (and both halves, if the split card has fuse) can’t be cast. The other half is unaffected.

May 1, 2009: If a card with morph is named, that card may still be cast face down. Face-down cards have no names.

May 1, 2009: Once Meddling Mage leaves the battlefield, the named card can be cast again.

Meddling Mage's creature type is Human Wizard. It was released with the set Planeshift, the second set and first small expansion in the Invasion Block, and the 22nd Magic: the Gathering expansion. This set was released on February 5, 2001, and contained 143 cards. Meddling Mage has a rarity of "Rare." It has a card number of 116, and the art was done by Christopher Moeller.

Meddling Mage was reprinted in Alara Reborn, the third set in the Alara block, and the 49th expansion. This set was released on April 30, 2009, and contained 145 cards. It has a card number of 9, and the art was done by Todd Lockwood.

Meddling Mage was also released as a Judge's Reward Card at PT Charleston in 2006. The art was done by Nottsuo.

This card contains flavor text. Flavor text is defined by Rule 207.2b (Flavor text is italicized text that, like the illustration, adds artistic appeal to the game. It appears below the rules text). The flavor text is as follows:

Planeshift and Judge's Promo: Meddling mages chant so loudly that no one can get a spell in edgewise.

Alara Reborn: "This violent wasteland is an indictment of its people. These cowards lack the will to oppose disorder."

Spellskite is one of the control spells used in this deck, and is primarily used to redirect spells from the player, Azor's Elocutors, or Meddling Mage. Information regarding Azor’s Elocutors can be found in Section 3.01 herein. Information regarding Meddling Mage can be found in Ssection 3.02 herein. This ensures that your win condition is secure, and that your lock on your opponents’ spells are protected. Spellskite also provides a fairly significant body, and can be useful for blocking in the early game. Further, Spellskite can be used to disrupt enemy auras or pump sells, preventing their creatures from receiving buffs. Its ability utilizes Phyrexian Mana, allowing you to pay life and utilize Spellskite, even if you have no free mana open, pursuant to Rule 107.4f (Phyrexian mana symbols are colored mana symbols: is white, is blue, is black, is red, and is green. A Phyrexian mana symbol represents a cost that can be paid either with one mana of its color or by paying 2 life. Example: can be paid by spending , by spending and paying 2 life, or by paying 4 life.). Because the rules text for Azor's Elocutors only removes counters when you are damaged, losing life to pay Spellskite's cost will not remove a filibuster counter (See Azor's Elocutors' rules text, reproduced in Section 3.01: Azor's Elocutors herein).

Spellskite costs a total of two (2) mana to cast. Both mana required to cast Spellskite are generic mana, defined by Rule 107.4. Any colour of mana may be spent to play Spellskite’s mana cost. The full test of Rule 107.4 can be found in Section 3.01: Azor’s Elocutors herein. This gives Spellskite a converted mana cost of two (2), pursuant to Rule 202.3. The full text of Rule 202.3 has been reproduced in Section 3.01: Azor's Elocutors herein.

Spellskite is a creature, a term that is defined by Rule 302. It has a power of three (3), and a toughness of five (5). The full text of Rule 302, including all relevant subsections, can be found in Section 3: Creatures, herein. In addition, Spellskite is also an artifact, a term that is defined by Rule 301. The full text of Rule 301, including all relevant subsections, can be found in Section 5: Artifacts herein. This combination of multiple card types is defined by Rule 300.2 (Some objects have more than one card type (for example, an artifact creature). Such objects combine the aspects of each of those card types, and are subject to spells and abilities that affect either or all of those card types.).

The rules text for Spellskite states as follows:

: Change a target of target spell or ability to Spellskite. ( can be paid with either or 2 life.)

The italicized text is Reminder Text, which serves to define other components of the rules text for the card. Reminder text is defined by Rule 207.2a (_Reminder text _is italicized text within parentheses that summarizes a rule that applies to that card. It usually appears on the same line as the ability it’s relevant to, but it may appear on its own line if it applies to an aspect of the card other than an ability.). In this case, the reminder text references Rule 107.4f defining Phyrexian Mana, which has been reproduced herein under this section (Section 3.03: Spellskite).

The following rulings have been made regarding Spellskite:

June 1, 2011: You can activate Spellskite’s ability even if Spellskite wouldn’t be a legal target for the spell or ability. However, the target of that spell or ability will remain unchanged.

June 1, 2011: If changing one target of a spell or ability to Spellskite would make other targets of that spell or ability illegal, the targets remain unchanged.

June 1, 2011: If the spell or ability has multiple instances of the word “target,” you choose which target you’re changing to Spellskite when Spellskite’s ability resolves.

June 1, 2011: By activating Spellskite’s ability multiple times, you can change each target of a spell or ability with multiple instances of the word “target” to Spellskite, one at a time.

June 1, 2011: The target of the spell or ability won’t change unless Spellskite fulfills all the targeting criteria, even if multiple instances of the word “target” are used. For example, you can’t change both targets of Arc Trail to Spellskite.

June 1, 2011: If a spell or ability has multiple targets but doesn’t use the word “target” multiple times, such as Fulgent Distraction, you can only successfully change one of the targets to Spellskite.

June 1, 2011: If a spell or ability has a variable number of targets, you can’t change the number of targets.

June 1, 2011: If Spellskite leaves the battlefield before its ability resolves, the targets remain unchanged.

Spellskite's creature type is Horror. It was released with the set New Phyrexia, the the set in the Scars of Mirrodin Block, and the 55th Magic: the Gathering expansion. This set was released on May 13, 2011, and contained 175 cards. Spellskite has a rarity of "Rare." It has a card number of 159, and the art was done by Chippy. It has the Phyrexian watermark.

Spellskite was reprinted in Modern Masters 2015 Edition, the second set in the Modern Masters series. This set was released on May 22, 2015, and contained 145 cards. It has a card number of 230., and the same art as the original printing.

Spellskite was also released as a Judge's Reward Card in 2017. The art was done by Svetlin Velinov.

This card contains flavor text. Flavor text is defined by Rule 207.2b. The text for Rule 207.2b can be found in Section 3.02: Meddling Mage herein. The flavor text for this card can be found on the New Phyrexia and Modern Masters 2015 Edition printings of the card, and is absent on the Judge's Promo version. The text is:

"Let's show Vorinclex that progress doesn't always need teeth or claws." —Malcator, Executor of Synthesis

This is a reference to Vorinclex, Voice of Hunger, the Green Praetor from New Phyrexia.

Enchantments are a type of permanent found in Magic: the Gathering. Enchantments are governed by Rule 303, which has been reproduced below.

303.1. A player who has priority may cast an enchantment card from his or her hand during a main phase of his or her turn when the stack is empty. Casting an enchantment as a spell uses the stack. (See rule 601, “Casting Spells.”)

303.2. When an enchantment spell resolves, its controller puts it onto the battlefield under his or her control.

303.3. Enchantment subtypes are always a single word and are listed after a long dash: “Enchantment — Shrine.” Each word after the dash is a separate subtype. Enchantment subtypes are also called enchantment types. Enchantments may have multiple subtypes. See rule 205.3h for the complete list of enchantment types.

303.4. Some enchantments have the subtype “Aura.” An Aura enters the battlefield attached to an object or player. What an Aura can be attached to is defined by its enchant keyword ability (see rule 702.5, “Enchant”). Other effects can limit what a permanent can be enchanted by.

303.4a An Aura spell requires a target, which is defined by its enchant ability.

303.4b The object or player an Aura is attached to is called enchanted. The Aura is attached to, or “enchants,” that object or player.

303.4c If an Aura is enchanting an illegal object or player as defined by its enchant ability and other applicable effects, the object it was attached to no longer exists, or the player it was attached to has left the game, the Aura is put into its owner’s graveyard. (This is a state-based action. See rule 704.)

303.4d An Aura can’t enchant itself. If this occurs somehow, the Aura is put into its owner’s graveyard. An Aura that’s also a creature can’t enchant anything. If this occurs somehow, the Aura becomes unattached, then is put into its owner’s graveyard. (These are state-based actions. See rule 704.) An Aura can’t enchant more than one object or player. If a spell or ability would cause an Aura to become attached to more than one object or player, the Aura’s controller chooses which object or player it becomes attached to.

303.4e An Aura’s controller is separate from the enchanted object’s controller or the enchanted player; the two need not be the same. If an Aura enchants an object, changing control of the object doesn’t change control of the Aura, and vice versa. Only the Aura’s controller can activate its abilities. However, if the Aura grants an ability to the enchanted object (with “gains” or “has”), the enchanted object’s controller is the only one who can activate that ability.

303.4f If an Aura is entering the battlefield under a player’s control by any means other than by resolving as an Aura spell, and the effect putting it onto the battlefield doesn’t specify the object or player the Aura will enchant, that player chooses what it will enchant as the Aura enters the battlefield. The player must choose a legal object or player according to the Aura’s enchant ability and any other applicable effects.

303.4g If an Aura is entering the battlefield and there is no legal object or player for it to enchant, the Aura remains in its current zone, unless that zone is the stack. In that case, the Aura is put into its owner’s graveyard instead of entering the battlefield.

303.4h If an effect attempts to put a permanent that isn’t an Aura, Equipment, or Fortification onto the battlefield attached to an object or player, it enters the battlefield unattached.

303.4i If an effect attempts to attach an Aura on the battlefield to an object or player, that object or player must be able to be enchanted by it. If the object or player can’t be, the Aura doesn’t move.

303.4j An ability of a permanent that refers to the “enchanted [object or player]” refers to whatever object or player that permanent is attached to, even if the permanent with the ability isn’t an Aura.

Copy Enchantment is used to add versatility to the deck, providing an additional copy of an immediately necessary enchantment.

Copy Enchantment costs a total of three (3) mana to cast. Two () of these mana can be generic mana, , as defined by Rule 107.4b. The full text of Rule 107.4 has been reproduced in Section 3.01: Azor’s Elocutors herein. The remaining mana is Blue mana, as defined by Rule 107, and . The full text of Rule 107 has been reproduced in Section 3.01: Azor's Elocutors herein. This gives Copy Enchantment a converted mana cost of three (3), pursuant to Rule 202.3. The full text of Rule 202.3 has been reproduced in Section 3.01: Azor's Elocutors herein.

Copy Enchantment is an Enchantment, a term that is defined by Rule 303. The full text of Rule 303, including all relevant subsections, can be found in Section 4: Enchantments, herein.

The rules text for Copy Enchantment states as follows:

You may have Copy Enchantment enter the battlefield as a copy of any enchantment on the battlefield.

The following rulings have been made regarding Copy Enchantment:

October 1, 2005: If you choose an Aura, you also choose a legal permanent for the Copy Enchantment copy of it to enchant. Copy Enchantment doesn’t target that permanent, however, so it can enter the battlefield attached to an untargetable creature.

October 1, 2005: If you choose an Aura and there isn’t a legal permanent for it to enchant, you put Copy Enchantment into your graveyard. It never enters the battlefield.

October 1, 2005: If you don’t choose an enchantment, Copy Enchantment enters the battlefield without copying anything, and it sits there with a useless ability.

April 1, 2006: If this is copying a Genju, such as Genju of the Fields, and the land this enchants goes to the graveyard, you will return the Copy Enchantment to your hand.

July 1, 200: Copies all copiable values, to include mana cost, so if you copy Dream Leash, for example, the converted mana cost of Copy Enchantment will be 5.

Copy Enchantment was released with the set Ravnica: City of Guilds, the first set in the Ravnica Block, and the 36th Magic: the Gathering expansion. This set was released on October 7, 2005, and contained 306 cards. Copy Enchantment has a rarity of "Rare." It has a card number of 42, and the art was done by Joel Thomas.

This card contains flavor text. Flavor text is defined by Rule 207.2b. The text for Rule 207.2b can be found in Section 3.02: Meddling Mage herein. The flavor text reads: Simic mages create redundant backups of their experiments to reduce the consequences of catastrophe.

This is a reference to the Simic Combine, the Blue/Green guild on the plane Ravnica.

Detention Sphere is used to remove permanents that have bypassed Meddling Mage (Section 3.02) and Nevermore (Section 4.05) and have successfully entered the battlefield.

Detention Sphere costs a total of three (3) mana to cast. One () of these mana can be generic mana, , as defined by Rule 107.4b. The full text of Rule 107.4 has been reproduced in Section 3.01: Azor’s Elocutors herein. The two remaining mana are one (1) Blue mana, and one (1) White mana, as defined by Rule 107, and . The full text of Rule 107 has been reproduced in Section 3.01: Azor's Elocutors herein. This gives Detention Sphere a converted mana cost of three (3), pursuant to Rule 202.3. The full text of Rule 202.3 has been reproduced in Section 3.01: Azor's Elocutors herein.

Detention Sphere is an Enchantment, a term that is defined by Rule 303. The full text of Rule 303, including all relevant subsections, can be found in Section 4: Enchantments, herein.

The rules text for Detention Sphere states as follows:

When Detention Sphere enters the battlefield, you may exile target nonland permanent not named Detention Sphere and all other permanents with the same name as that permanent. When Detention Sphere leaves the battlefield, return the exiled cards to the battlefield under their owner's control.

The following rulings have been made regarding Detention Sphere:

October 1, 2012: Although the target of the enters-the-battlefield ability must not be a land, lands with the same name as that permanent will be exiled.

October 1, 2012: The enters-the-battlefield ability has only one target. The other permanents with that name aren’t targeted. For example, a permanent with protection from white will be exiled if it has the same name as the target nonland permanent.

October 1, 2012: If the target nonland permanent is an illegal target when the enters-the-battlefield ability tries to resolve, it will be countered and none of its effects will happen. No permanents will be exiled, including those with the same name as the target.

October 1, 2012: If Detention Sphere leaves the battlefield before its enters-the-battlefield ability has resolved, its leaves-the-battlefield ability will trigger and do nothing. Then the enters-the-battlefield ability will resolve and exile the targeted nonland permanent and other permanents with that name indefinitely.

Detention Sphere was released with the set Return to Ravnica, the first set in the Return to Ravnica Block, and the 59th Magic: the Gathering expansion. This set was released on October 5, 2012, and contained 274 cards. Detention Sphere has a rarity of "Rare." It has a card number of 155, and the art was done by Kev Walker. It has the Azorius watermark.

Ghostly Prison is used to prevent creatures from attacking. Ensnaring Bridge (Section 5.02: Ensnaring Bridge) performs a similar function, but is not as effective in the early game, as you likely still have cards in your hand. Likewise, Ghostly Prison is not as effective in the later game, because opponents will have free mana once their win conditions have been played.

Ghostly Prison costs a total of three (3) mana to cast. Two () of these mana can be generic mana, , as defined by Rule 107.4b. The full text of Rule 107.4 has been reproduced in Section 3.01: Azor’s Elocutors herein. The one remaining mana is one (1) White mana, as defined by Rule 107, and . The full text of Rule 107 has been reproduced in Section 3.01: Azor's Elocutors herein. This gives Ghostly Prison a converted mana cost of three (3), pursuant to Rule 202.3. The full text of Rule 202.3 has been reproduced in Section 3.01: Azor's Elocutors herein.

Ghostly Prison is an Enchantment, a term that is defined by Rule 303. The full text of Rule 303, including all relevant subsections, can be found in Section 4: Enchantments, herein.

The rules text for Ghostly Prison states as follows:

Creatures can't attack you unless their controller pays for each creature he or she controls that's attacking you.

The following rulings have been made regarding Ghostly Prison:

February 1, 2007: In the Two-Headed Giant format, you still only have to pay once per creature.

February 1, 2007: Unless some effect explicitly says otherwise, a creature that can’t attack you can still attack a planeswalker you control.

Ghostly Prison was released with the set Champions of Kamigawa, the first set in the Kamigawa Block, and the 33rd Magic: the Gathering expansion. This set was released on October 1, 2004, and contained 306 cards. Ghostly Prison has a rarity of "Uncommon." It has a card number of 10, and the art was done by Lars Grant-West.

Ghostly Prison has been rereleased five times. The artwork for the reprints was done by Wayne England. It was released in the following sets:

  • Magic: The Gathering-Commander, in the Political Puppets deck, released on June 17, 2011. The card number is 14.

  • Planechase 2012 Edition, in the Savage Auras deck, released on June 1, 2012. The card number is 7.

  • Conspiracy: Take the Crown, released on August 26, 2016. The card number is 86.

  • Commander 2016, in the Stalwart Unity deck, released on November 11, 2016. The card number 66.

  • Planechase Anthology, in the Savage Auras deck, released on November 25, 2016. The card number is 66.

This card contains flavor text. Flavor text is defined by Rule 207.2b. The text for Rule 207.2b can be found in Section 3.02: Meddling Mage herein.

For the original Champions of Kamigawa release, the flavor text is:

Destroyed in one of the first battles of the Kami War, the town of Reito still grieved.

All reprints of these cards have contained the following flavor text:

"May the memory of our fallen heroes ensnare the violent hearts of lesser men." —Great Threshold of Monserkat inscription

Leyline of Sanctity is used to foil enemy burn spells, and spells such as Thoughtsieze.

Leyline of Sanctity costs a total of four (4) mana to cast. Two () of these mana can be generic mana, , as defined by Rule 107.4b. The full text of Rule 107.4 has been reproduced in Section 3.01: Azor’s Elocutors herein. The two remaining mana are two (2) White mana, as defined by Rule 107, and . The full text of Rule 107 has been reproduced in Section 3.01: Azor's Elocutors herein. This gives Leyline of Sanctity a converted mana cost of four (4), pursuant to Rule 202.3. The full text of Rule 202.3 has been reproduced in Section 3.01: Azor's Elocutors herein.

Leyline of Sanctity is an Enchantment, a term that is defined by Rule 303. The full text of Rule 303, including all relevant subsections, can be found in Section 4: Enchantments, herein.

The rules text for Leyline of Sanctity states as follows:

If Leyline of Sanctity is in your opening hand, you may begin the game with it on the battlefield.

You have hexproof. (You can't be the target of spells or abilities your opponents control.)

The following rulings have been made regarding Leyline of Sanctity:

June 8, 2016: A player’s “opening hand” is the hand of cards the player has after all players have taken mulligans and “scryed” if applicable. If players have any cards in hand that allow actions to be taken with them from a player’s opening hand, the starting player takes all such actions first in any order, followed by each other player in turn order. Then the first turn begins.

Leyline of Sanctity was released with the set Magic 2011, the core set released on July 16, 2010. This set contained 249 cards. Leyline of Sanctity has a rarity of "Rare." It has a card number of 21, and the art was done by Ryan Pancoast.

Leyline of Sanctity was rereleased in Modern Masters 2015 on May 22, 2015. It had a card number of 23.

Nevermore is one of the control spells used in this deck, and is used to deny opponents the ability to cast their spells. This is a similar effect to Meddling Mage. Information regarding Nevermore can be found in Section 3.02: Meddling Mage herein. Nevermore costs a total of three (3) mana to cast. One () of these mana can be generic mana, , as defined by Rule 107.4b. The full text of Rule 107.4 has been reproduced in Section 3.01: Azor’s Elocutors herein. The two remaining mana are two (2) White mana, as defined by Rule 107, and . The full text of Rule 107 has been reproduced in Section 3.01: Azor's Elocutors herein. This gives Nevermore a converted mana cost of three (3), pursuant to Rule 202.3. The full text of Rule 202.3 has been reproduced in Section 3.01: Azor's Elocutors herein.

Nevermore is an Enchantment, a term that is defined by Rule 303. The full text of Rule 303, including all relevant subsections, can be found in Section 4: Enchantments, herein.

The rules text for Nevermore states as follows:

As Nevermore enters the battlefield, choose a nonland card name.

Spells with the chosen name can't be cast.

The following rulings have been made regarding Nevermore:

September 22, 2011: No one can cast spells or activate abilities between the time a card is named and the time that Nevermore’s ability starts to work.

September 22, 2011: Spells with the chosen name that somehow happen to already be on the stack when Nevermore enters the battlefield are not affected by Nevermore’s ability.

September 22, 2011: Although the named card can’t be cast, it can still be put onto the battlefield by a spell or ability (if it’s a permanent card).

September 22, 2011: You can name either half of a split card, but not both. If you do so, that half (and both halves, if the split card has fuse) can’t be cast. The other half is unaffected.

September 22, 2011: If you want to name a double-faced card, remember to name the front face of that card. (The back face can’t be cast anyway.)

September 22, 2011: The named card can be cast again once Nevermore leaves the battlefield.

Nevermore was released with the set Innistrad, the first set in the Innistrad block, and the 56th Magic: the Gathering expansion. The set was released on September 30, 2011, and contained 249 cards. Nevermore has a rarity of "Rare." It has a card number of 25, and the art was done by Jason A. Engle.

This card contains flavor text. Flavor text is defined by Rule 207.2b. The text for Rule 207.2b can be found in Section 3.02: Meddling Mage herein. The flavor text is as follows:

"By the law of Avacyn, the following thoughts, words, and deeds are henceforth disallowed."

Runed Halo is used provide protection from enemy spells, as well as enemy creatures that have resolved and entered the battlefield.

Runed Halo costs a total of two (2) mana to cast. The two mana are two (2) White mana, as defined by Rule 107, and . The full text of Rule 107 has been reproduced in Section 3.01: Azor's Elocutors herein. This gives Runed Halo a converted mana cost of two (2), pursuant to Rule 202.3. The full text of Rule 202.3 has been reproduced in Section 3.01: Azor's Elocutors herein.

Runed Halo is an Enchantment, a term that is defined by Rule 303. The full text of Rule 303, including all relevant subsections, can be found in Section 4: Enchantments, herein.

The rules text for Runed Halo states as follows:

As Runed Halo enters the battlefield, choose a card name.

You have protection from the chosen name. (You can't be targeted, dealt damage, or enchanted by anything with that name.)

The following rulings have been made regarding Runed Halo:

May 1, 2018: Runed Halo gives you protection from each object with the chosen name, whether it’s a card, a token, or a copy of a spell. It doesn’t matter what game zone that object is in.

May 1, 2018: You can still be attacked by creatures with the chosen name.

May 1, 2018: You’ll have protection from the name, not from the word. For example, if you choose the name Forest, you’ll have protection from anything named “Forest” — but you won’t have protection from Forests. An animated Sapseep Forest, for example, could deal damage to you even though its subtype is Forest.

May 1, 2018: You can name either half of a split card, but not both. You’ll have protection from the half you named (and from a fused split spell with that name), but not the other half.

May 1, 2018: You can’t choose [nothing] as a name. Face-down creatures have no name, so Runed Halo can’t give you protection from them.

May 1, 2018: You must choose the name of a card, not the name of a token. For example, you can’t choose “Saproling” or “Voja.” However, if a token happens to have the same name as a card (such as “Shapeshifter” or “Goldmeadow Harrier”), you can choose it.

May 1, 2018: You may choose either one of a flip card’s names. You’ll have protection only from the appropriate version. For example, if you choose Nighteyes the Desecrator, you won’t have protection from Nezumi Graverobber.

Runed Halo was released with the set Shadowmoor, the first set in the Shadowmoor block, and the 45th Magic: the Gathering expansion. The set was released on May 2, 2008, and contained 301 cards. Runed Halo has a rarity of "Rare." It has a card number of 21, and the art was done by Steve Prescott.

Telepathy is used to view your opponent’s hand, so that you may more accurately choose relevant threats when playing Meddling Mage (Section 3.02: Meddling Mage), Nevermore (Section 4.05: Nevermore), and Runed Halo (Section 4.06: Runed Halo).

Telepathy costs a total of one (1) mana to cast. The mana is one (1) Blue mana, as defined by Rule 107, and . The full text of Rule 107 has been reproduced in Section 3.01: Azor's Elocutors herein. This gives Telepathy a converted mana cost of one (1), pursuant to Rule 202.3. The full text of Rule 202.3 has been reproduced in Section 3.01: Azor's Elocutors herein.

Telepathy is an Enchantment, a term that is defined by Rule 303. The full text of Rule 303, including all relevant subsections, can be found in Section 4: Enchantments, herein.

The rules text for Telepathy states as follows:

Your opponents play with their hands revealed.

There have been no rulings regarding Telepathy:

Telepathy was released with the Urza’s Saga set, released on October 12, 1998, and contained 350 cards. Telepathy has a rarity of "Uncommon." It has a card number of 102, and the art was done by Matthew D. Wilson

Telepathy has been rereleased five times. With the exception of the 7th Edition copy, all reprints were also illustrated by Matthew D. Wilson. The 7th Edition copy was illustrated by Mark Tedin.

  • 7th Edition, released on April 11, 2001.

  • 8th Edition, released on July 28, 2003. The card number is 105.

  • 9th Edition, released on July 29, 2005. The card number is 101.

  • 10th Edition, released on July 13, 2003. The card number is 113.

  • Magic 2010, released on July 17, 2009. The card number is 74.

This card contains flavor text. Flavor text is defined by Rule 207.2b. The text for Rule 207.2b can be found in Section 3.02: Meddling Mage herein.

The flavor text for the Urza’s Saga and Magic 2010 printings is:

"The most disappointing thing about learning telepathy is finding out how boring people really are." -Teferi, fourth-level student

The flavor text for the 7th, 8th, and 9th Edition printings is:

"Secrets? What secrets?"

The flavor text for the 10th Edition printing is:

"The question isn't whether I can read minds. It's whether I have yet to find a mind worth reading." -Ambassador Laquatus

Artifacts are a type of permanent found in Magic: the Gathering. Artifacts are governed by Rule 301, which has been reproduced below.

301.1. A player who has priority may cast an artifact card from his or her hand during a main phase of his or her turn when the stack is empty. Casting an artifact as a spell uses the stack. (See rule 601, “Casting Spells.”)

301.2. When an artifact spell resolves, its controller puts it onto the battlefield under his or her control.

301.3. Artifact subtypes are always a single word and are listed after a long dash: “Artifact — Equipment.” Artifact subtypes are also called artifact types. Artifacts may have multiple subtypes. See rule 205.3g for the complete list of artifact types.

301.4. Artifacts have no characteristics specific to their card type. Most artifacts have no colored mana symbols in their mana costs, and are therefore colorless. However, there is no correlation between being colorless and being an artifact: artifacts may be colored, and colorless objects may be card types other than artifact.

301.5. Some artifacts have the subtype “Equipment.” An Equipment can be attached to a creature. It can’t legally be attached to an object that isn’t a creature.

301.5a The creature an Equipment is attached to is called the “equipped creature.” The Equipment is attached to, or “equips,” that creature.

301.5b An Equipment is cast and enters the battlefield just like any other artifact. An Equipment doesn’t enter the battlefield attached to a creature. The equip keyword ability attaches the Equipment to a creature you control (see rule 702.6, “Equip”). Control of the creature matters only when the equip ability is activated and when it resolves. Spells and other abilities may also attach an Equipment to a creature. If an effect attempts to attach an Equipment to an object that can’t be equipped by it, the Equipment doesn’t move.

301.5c An Equipment that’s also a creature can’t equip a creature. An Equipment that loses the subtype “Equipment” can’t equip a creature. An Equipment can’t equip itself. An Equipment that equips an illegal or nonexistent permanent becomes unattached from that permanent but remains on the battlefield. (This is a state-based action. See rule 704.) An Equipment can’t equip more than one creature. If a spell or ability would cause an Equipment to equip more than one creature, the Equipment’s controller chooses which creature it equips.

301.5d An Equipment’s controller is separate from the equipped creature’s controller; the two need not be the same. Changing control of the creature doesn’t change control of the Equipment, and vice versa. Only the Equipment’s controller can activate its abilities. However, if the Equipment grants an ability to the equipped creature (with “gains” or “has”), the equipped creature’s controller is the only one who can activate that ability.

301.5e An ability of a permanent that refers to the “equipped creature” refers to whatever creature that permanent is attached to, even if the permanent with the ability isn’t an Equipment.

301.6. Some artifacts have the subtype “Fortification.” A Fortification can be attached to a land. It can’t legally be attached to an object that isn’t a land. Fortification’s analog to the equip keyword ability is the fortify keyword ability. Rules 301.5a–e apply to Fortifications in relation to lands just as they apply to Equipment in relation to creatures, with one clarification relating to rule 301.5c: a Fortification that’s also a creature (not a land) can’t fortify a land. (See rule 702.66, “Fortify.”)

Elixir of Immortality is used to regain any life you may have lost, and to buy additional turns to shore up your defenses. It also allows you to regain any cards that might have been placed in your graveyard.

Elixir of Immortality costs a total of one (1) mana to cast. This mana can be generic mana, , as defined by Rule 107.4b. The full text of Rule 107.4 has been reproduced in Section 3.01: Azor’s Elocutors herein. This gives Elixir of Immortality a converted mana cost of one (1), pursuant to Rule 202.3. The full text of Rule 202.3 has been reproduced in Section 3.01: Azor's Elocutors herein.

Elixir of Immortality is an Artifact, a term that is defined by Rule 301. The full text of Rule 301, including all relevant subsections, can be found in Section 5: Artifacts, herein.

The rules text for Elixir of Immortality states as follows:

, : You gain 5 life. Shuffle Elixir of Immortality and your graveyard into their owner's library.

The following rulings have been made regarding Meddling Mage:

August 15, 2010: Paying the activation cost of Elixir of Immortality’s ability doesn’t cause it to leave the battlefield. If you have a way to untap it, you can activate the ability multiple times in response to itself.

September 22, 2011: As the ability resolves, you’ll shuffle Elixir of Immortality into its owner’s library directly from the battlefield, if it’s still there.

September 22, 2011: If Elixir of Immortality is in your graveyard at the time the ability resolves, you’ll still wind up shuffling it into your library because you shuffle your entire graveyard into your library. If it’s anywhere else by that time, including in another player’s graveyard, it remains where it is and you shuffle just your graveyard into your library.

September 22, 2011: If you gain control of another player’s Elixir of Immortality and activate it, the Elixir of Immortality will be shuffled into its owner’s library and the cards in your graveyard will be shuffled into your library. You are considered to have shuffled each affected library (even if, as a shortcut, each player physically shuffles his or her own library).

Elixir of Immortality was released with the Magic 2011 core set, released on July 16, 2010, and containing 249 cards. Elixir of Immortality has a rarity of "Uncommon." It has a card number of 206, and the art was done by Zoltan Boros & Gabor Szikszai

Elixir of Immortality has been rereleased five times. All reprints were also illustrated by Matthew D. Wilson. The 7th Edition copy was illustrated by Mark Tedin.

  • Duel Decks: Elspeth vs. Tezzeret, released on September 3, 2010, in the Tezzeret deck. The card number is 62.

  • Magic 2012, released on July 15, 2011. The card number is 208.

  • Magic 2013, released on July 13, 2012. The card number is 204.

  • Magic 2014, released on July 19, 2013. The card number is 209.

This card contains flavor text. Flavor text is defined by Rule 207.2b. The text for Rule 207.2b can be found in Section 3.02: Meddling Mage herein.

The flavor text for this card is found on all printings, and is as follows:

"Bottled life. Not as tasty as I'm used to, rather stale, but it has the same effect." -Baron Sengir

Ensnaring Bridge is used to prevent creatures from attacking. Ghostly Prison (Section 4.03: Ghostly Prison) performs a similar function, but is not as effective in the late game, as your opponents may have sufficient mana to allow a large creature to attack. Likewise, Ensnaring Bridge is not as effective in the early game, as you likely still have cards in your hand.

Ensnaring Bridge costs a total of three (3) mana to cast. This mana can be generic mana, , as defined by Rule 107.4b. The full text of Rule 107.4 has been reproduced in Section 3.01: Azor’s Elocutors herein. This gives Ensnaring Bridge a converted mana cost of three (3), pursuant to Rule 202.3. The full text of Rule 202.3 has been reproduced in Section 3.01: Azor's Elocutors herein.

Ensnaring Bridge is an Artifact, a term that is defined by Rule 301. The full text of Rule 301, including all relevant subsections, can be found in Section 5: Artifacts, herein.

The rules text for Ensnaring Bridge states as follows:

Creatures with power greater than the number of cards in your hand can't attack.

The following rulings have been made regarding Ensnaring Bridge.

October 4, 2004: All creatures on the battlefield (including yours) are subject to the restriction based on the number of cards in your hand.

October 4, 2004: It only checks the cards in your hand when declaring attackers. Once they are declared, changes to your hand size or to the power of the creatures will not remove creatures from the attack.

Ensnaring Bridge was released with Stronghold set, the second set and first small expansion in the Tempest block, and the 13th Magic: the Gathering expansion. Stronghold was released on March 2, 1998, and contained 143 cards. Ensnaring Bridge has a rarity of "Rare." The art was done by Pete Venters.

Ensnaring Bridge has been rereleased three times. The Masterpiece Series: Kaladesh Inventions release is the only printing without a “Rare” rarity; its rarity is considered “Special.”

  • 7th Edition, released on April 11, 2001. The card number is 294 and the artist is Ron Spencer.

  • 8th Edition, released on July 28, 2003. The card number is 300, and the art is the same as the 7th Edition printing.

  • Masterpiece Series: Kaladesh Inventions, released on September 24, 2016. The card number is 37 and the artist is Florian de Gesincourt.

This card contains flavor text. Flavor text is defined by Rule 207.2b. The text for Rule 207.2b can be found in Section 3.02: Meddling Mage herein.

The flavor text for this card is found on all printings, and is as follows:

The flavor text for the Stronghold printing is:

"I expected a fight, but I didn't expect it from the building itself." -Gerrard

The flavor text for the 7th Edition printing is:

Bridges usually get you from one place to another. This one just gets you.

The flavor text for the 8th Edition printing is:

"Why build a bridge that needs to be guarded?" -Elvish champion

The flavor text for the Masterpiece Series: Kaladesh Inventions is:

"With a few minor adjustments, we were able to convert sky-dock assisters into a defense system for the Aether Spire." -Consulate engineer's log

Lightning Greaves is used to protect your Meddling Mages and Azor's Elocutors from enemy removal spells.

Lightning Greaves costs a total of two (2) mana to cast. This mana can be generic mana, , as defined by Rule 107.4b. The full text of Rule 107.4 has been reproduced in Section 3.01: Azor’s Elocutors herein. This gives Lightning Greaves a converted mana cost of two (2), pursuant to Rule 202.3. The full text of Rule 202.3 has been reproduced in Section 3.01: Azor's Elocutors herein.

Lightning Greaves is an Artifact, a term that is defined by Rule 301. Specifically, it is an equipment, defined under Rule 301.5 and its subparts. The full text of Rule 301, including all relevant subsections, can be found in Section 5: Artifacts, herein.
The rules text for Lightning Greaves states as follows:

Equipped creature has haste and shroud. (It can't be the target of spells or abilities.)

Equip

April 15, 2013: You are not allowed to “unequip” equipment from a creature. If Lightning Greaves is attached to the only creature you control, you won’t be able to attach other equipment to it (or target it with anything else) until you have another creature onto which you can move Lightning Greaves.

Lightning Greaves was released with Mirrodin set, the first set in the Mirrodin block, and the 30th Magic: the Gathering expansion. Mirrodin was released on October 2, 2003, and contained 306 cards. Lightning Greaves has a rarity of "Uncommon." The art was done by Jeremy Jarvis.

Lightning Greaves has been rereleased eight times. The Masterpiece Series: Kaladesh Inventions release is the only printing without a “Rare” rarity; its rarity is considered “Special.” The art for all printings was by Jeremy Jarvis, excepting the Kaladesh Inventions printing, which was by Slawomir Maniak.

  • Duel Decks: Phyrexia vs. the Coalition, in the Phyrexia deck, released on March 19, 2010. The card number is 19.

  • Archenemy, in the Assemble the Doomsday Machine deck released on June 18, 2010. The card number is 110.

  • Magic: The Gathering-Commander, in all five decks (Heavenly Inferno, Mirror Mastery, Counterpunch, Political Puppets, and Devour for Power) released on June 17, 2011. The card number is 253.

- Commander 2015, in three of the five decks (Call the Spirits, Plunder the Graves, and Wade into Battle), released on November 13, 2015. The card number is 257.

  • Masterpiece Series: Kaladesh Inventions, released on September 24, 2016. The card number is 14.

  • Commander 2016, in the Open Hostility deck, released on November 13, 2015. The card number is 257.

  • Commander Anthology, in the Heavenly Inferno and Plunder the Graves decks, released on June 9, 2017. The card number is 220.

  • Commander 2017, in the Draconic Domination and Feline Ferocity decks, released on August 25, 2017. The card number is 215.

This card contains flavor text. Flavor text is defined by Rule 207.2b. The text for Rule 207.2b can be found in Section 3.02: Meddling Mage herein.

The Mirrodin printing lacks flavor text.

The flavor text for the Masterpiece Series: Kaladesh Inventions is:

This matched set incorporates aetheric accelerators and deflection matrices in an elegant, wearable design.

The remaining printings have the following flavor text:

After lightning struck the cliffs, the ore became iron, the iron became steel, and the steel became greaves. The lightning never left.

Lands are a type of permanent found in Magic: the Gathering. Lands are governed by Rule 305, which has been reproduced below.

305.1. A player who has priority may play a land card from his or her hand during a main phase of his or her turn when the stack is empty. Playing a land is a special action; it doesn’t use the stack (see rule 115). Rather, the player simply puts the land onto the battlefield. Since the land doesn’t go on the stack, it is never a spell, and players can’t respond to it with instants or activated abilities. 305.2. A player can normally play one land during his or her turn; however, continuous effects may increase this number.

305.2a To determine whether a player can play a land, compare the number of lands the player can play this turn with the number of lands he or she has already played this turn (including lands played as special actions and lands played during the resolution of spells and abilities). If the number of lands the player can play is greater, the play is legal.

305.2b A player can’t play a land, for any reason, if number of lands the player can play this turn is equal to or less than the number of lands he or she has already played this turn. Ignore any part of an effect that instructs a player to do so.

305.3. A player can’t play a land, for any reason, if it isn’t his or her turn. Ignore any part of an effect that instructs a player to do so.

305.4. Effects may also allow players to “put” lands onto the battlefield. This isn’t the same as “playing a land” and doesn’t count as a land played during the current turn.

305.5. Land subtypes are always a single word and are listed after a long dash. Land subtypes are also called land types. Lands may have multiple subtypes. See rule 205.3i for the complete list of land types. Example: “Basic Land — Mountain” means the card is a land with the subtype Mountain.

305.6. The basic land types are Plains, Island, Swamp, Mountain, and Forest. If an object uses the words “basic land type,” it’s referring to one of these subtypes. A land with a basic land type has the intrinsic ability “: Add [mana symbol] to your mana pool,” even if the text box doesn’t actually contain that text or the object has no text box. For Plains, [mana symbol] is ; for Islands, ; for Swamps, ; for Mountains, ; and for Forests, . See rule 107.4a. Also see rule 605, “Mana Abilities.”

305.7. If an effect sets a land’s subtype to one or more of the basic land types, the land no longer has its old land type. It loses all abilities generated from its rules text, its old land types, and any copy effects affecting that land, and it gains the appropriate mana ability for each new basic land type. Note that this doesn’t remove any abilities that were granted to the land by other effects. Setting a land’s subtype doesn’t add or remove any card types (such as creature) or supertypes (such as basic, legendary, and snow) the land may have. If a land gains one or more land types in addition to its own, it keeps its land types and rules text, and it gains the new land types and mana abilities.

305.8. Any land with the supertype “basic” is a basic land. Any land that doesn’t have this supertype is a nonbasic land, even if it has a basic land type.

305.9. If an object is both a land and another card type, it can be played only as a land. It can’t be cast as a spell.

Celestial Colonnade serves as both mana fixing and an alternate win condition.

Celestial Colonnade is a Land, a term that is defined by Rule 305. Specifically, it is an equipment, defined under Rule 301.5 and its subparts. The full text of Rule 305, including all relevant subsections, can be found in Section 6: Lands, herein. It can become a creature, governed by Rule 302. The rules text for Rule 302, including all relevant subsections, can be found in Section 3: Creatures, herein.

The rules text for Celestial Colonnade states as follows:

: Add or to your mana pool.

: Until end of turn, Celestial Colonnade becomes a 4/4 white and blue Elemental creature with flying and vigilance. It's still a land.

March 1, 2010: A land that becomes a creature may be affected by “summoning sickness.” You can’t attack with it or use any of its abilities (including its mana abilities) unless it began your most recent turn on the battlefield under your control. Note that summoning sickness cares about when that permanent came under your control, not when it became a creature.

March 1, 2010: When a land becomes a creature, that doesn’t count as having a creature enter the battlefield. The permanent was already on the battlefield; it only changed its types. Abilities that trigger whenever a creature enters the battlefield won’t trigger.

Celestial Colonnade was released with Worldwake set, the second set in the Zendikar block, and the 51st Magic: the Gathering expansion. Worldwake was released on February 5, 2010, and contained 145 cards. Celestial Colonnade has a rarity of "Rare." The art was done by Eric Deschamps. It has a card number of 133.

Flooded Strand provides mana fixing.

Flooded Strand is a Land, a term that is defined by Rule 305. Specifically, it is an equipment, defined under Rule 301.5 and its subparts. The full text of Rule 305, including all relevant subsections, can be found in Section 6: Lands, herein.

The rules text for Flooded Strand states as follows:

: Pay 1 life, Sacrifice Flooded Strand: Search your library for a Plains or Island card and put it onto the battlefield. Then shuffle your library.

Flooded Strand was released with the Onslaught set, the first set in the Onslaught block, and the 27th Magic: the Gathering expansion. Onslaught was released on October 7, 2002, and contained 250 cards. Flooded Strand has a rarity of "Rare." The art was done by Rob Alexander. It has a card number of 316.

Flooded Strand has been rereleased twice.

  • Khans of Tarkir, released on September 26, 2014. The rarity is “Rare.” The art was done by Andreas Rocha. The card number is 233.

  • Zendikar Expeditions, which were promotional cards included in some Battle for Zendikar block sets. These cards were released alongside Battle for Zendikar (October 2, 2015) and Oath of the Gatewatch (January 22, 2016) The rarity is “Mythic Rare.” The art was done by Véronique Meignaud. The card number is 16.

Glacial Fortress provides mana fixing.

Glacial Fortress is a Land, a term that is defined by Rule 305. Specifically, it is an equipment, defined under Rule 301.5 and its subparts. The full text of Rule 305, including all relevant subsections, can be found in Section 6: Lands, herein.

The rules text for Glacial Fortress states as follows:

Glacial Fortress enters the battlefield tapped unless you control a Plains or an Island.

: Add or to your mana pool.

The following rulings have been made regarding Glacial Fortress:

October 1, 2009: This checks for lands you control with the land type Plains or Island, not for lands named Plains or Island. The lands it checks for don’t have to be basic lands. For example, if you control Watery Grave (a nonbasic land with the land types Island and Swamp), Glacial Fortress will enter the battlefield untapped.

October 1, 2009: As this is entering the battlefield, it checks for lands that are already on the battlefield. It won’t see lands that are entering the battlefield at the same time (due to Warp World, for example).

Glacial Fortress was released with the core set Magic 2010. Magic 2010 was released on July 17, 2009, and contained 249 cards. Glacial Fortress has a rarity of "Rare." The art was done by Franz Vohwinkel. It has a card number of 226.

Glacial Fortress has been rereleased four times. With the exception of the Ixalan release, which was illustrated by James Paick, all art has been the same.

  • Magic 2011, released on July 16, 2010. It has a card number of 225.

  • Magic 2012, released on July 9, 2011. It has a card number of 227.

  • Magic 2013, released on July 7, 2012. It has a card number of 225.

  • Ixalan, released September 29, 2017. It has a card number of 255.

This card contains flavor text. Flavor text is defined by Rule 207.2b. The text for Rule 207.2b can be found in Section 3.02: Meddling Mage herein.

The flavor text for this card is only found on the Ixalan printing, and is as follows:

Ships blown north in their voyage across the Stormwreck Sea become trapped in the unmelting ice.

Hallowed Fountain serves as both mana fixing and an alternate win condition.

Hallowed Fountain is a Land, a term that is defined by Rule 305. Specifically, it is an equipment, defined under Rule 301.5 and its subparts. The full text of Rule 305, including all relevant subsections, can be found in Section 6: Lands, herein. Hallowed Fountain is both a Plains and an Island.

The rules text for Hallowed Fountain states as follows:

(: Add or to your mana pool.)

As Hallowed Fountain enters the battlefield, you may pay 2 life. If you don't, Hallowed Fountain enters the battlefield tapped.

The following rulings have been made regarding Hallowed Fountain:

October 1, 2005: Has basic land types, but isn’t a basic land. Things that affect basic lands don’t affect it. For example, you can’t find it with Civic Wayfinder.

October 1, 2005: If another effect (such as Loxodon Gatekeeper’s ability) tells you to put lands onto the battlefield tapped, it enters the battlefield tapped whether you pay 2 life or not.

October 1, 2005: If multiple permanents with “as enters the battlefield” effects are entering the battlefield at the same time, process those effects one at a time, then put the permanents onto the battlefield all at once. For example, if you’re at 3 life and an effect puts two of these onto the battlefield, you can pay 2 life for only one of them, not both.

Hallowed Fountain was released with the Dissension set, the third set in the Ravnica Block. Dissension was released on May 5, 2009, and contained 180 cards. Hallowed Fountain has a rarity of "Rare." The art was done by Rob Alexander. It has a card number of 174. It has the Azorius Watermark.

Hallowed Fountain has been rereleased two times. With the exception of the Ixalan release, which was illustrated by James Paick, all art has been the same.

It was released with the set Return to Ravnica, the first set in the REturn to Ravnica Block, and the 59th Magic: the Gathering expansion. This set was released on October 5, 2012, and contained 274 cards. Azor's Elocutors has a rarity of "Rare." It has a Card Number of 210, and the art was done by Johannes Voss. It has the Azorius watermark.

  • Return to Ravnica, released on October 5, 2012. It had a rarity of “Rare.” The artist was Jung Park. The card number is 241. It has the Azorius Watermark.

  • Zendikar Expeditions, which were promotional cards included in some Battle for Zendikar block sets. These cards were released alongside Battle for Zendikar (October 2, 2015) and Oath of the Gatewatch (January 22, 2016) The rarity is “Mythic Rare.” The art was done by Min Yum. The card number is 6. This is the only printing without a watermark.

This card contains flavor text. Flavor text is defined by Rule 207.2b. The text for Rule 207.2b can be found in Section 3.02: Meddling Mage herein.

The flavor text for this card is only found on the Return to Ravnica printing, and is as follows:

_ A place to relax, if you have the proper permit._

Island serves to provide mana, and as a potential target and as a potential target for Flooded Strand and enemy spells which grant basic lands (i.e. Path to Exile).

Island is a Land, a term that is defined by Rule 305. Specifically, it is an equipment, defined under Rule 301.5 and its subparts. The full text of Rule 305, including all relevant subsections, can be found in Section 6: Lands, herein. Specifically, it is a basic land, defined by Rule 205.4c (Any land with the supertype “basic” is a basic land. Any land that doesn’t have this supertype is a nonbasic land, even if it has a basic land type. Cards printed in sets prior to the Eighth Edition core set didn’t use the word “basic” to indicate a basic land. Cards from those sets with the following names are basic lands and have received errata in the Oracle card reference accordingly: Forest, Island, Mountain, Plains, Swamp, Snow-Covered Forest, Snow-Covered Island, Snow-Covered Mountain, Snow-Covered Plains, and Snow-Covered Swamp.)

Islands have been released in every single set, with multiple artworks per set.

Nykthos, Shrine to Nyx serves to provide a large boost of mana. It works well with cards such as Nevermore and Runed Halo, which provide two white devotion per card. This allows you to play several cards from your hand at once, both giving you an advantage on the battlefield, and emptying your hand for Ensnaring Bridge.

Nykthos, Shrine to Nyx is a Land, a term that is defined by Rule 305. Specifically, it is an equipment, defined under Rule 301.5 and its subparts. The full text of Rule 305, including all relevant subsections, can be found in Section 6: Lands, herein. Nykthos, Shrine to Nyx, uses the devotion mechanic, which is defined by Rule 700.5 (A player’s devotion to [color] is equal to the number of mana symbols of that color among the mana costs of permanents that player controls.)

The rules text for Nykthos, Shrine to Nyx states as follows:

: Add to your mana pool.

, Choose a color. Add to your mana pool an amount of mana of that color equal to your devotion to that color. (Your devotion to a color is the number of mana symbols of that color in the mana costs of permanents you control.)

The following rulings have been made regarding Nykthos, Shrine to Nyx:

September 15, 2013: The second ability is a mana ability. It doesn’t use the stack and can’t be responded to.

September 15, 2013: Numeric mana symbols (, , and so on) in mana costs of permanents you control don’t count toward your devotion to any color.

September 15, 2013: Mana symbols in the text boxes of permanents you control don’t count toward your devotion to any color.

September 15, 2013: Hybrid mana symbols, monocolored hybrid mana symbols, and Phyrexian mana symbols do count toward your devotion to their color(s).

September 15, 2013: If an activated ability or triggered ability has an effect that depends on your devotion to a color, you count the number of mana symbols of that color among the mana costs of permanents you control as the ability resolves. The permanent with that ability will be counted if it’s still on the battlefield at that time.

Nykthos, Shrine to Nyx was released with the Theros set, the first set in the Theros Block, and the 62nd Magic: the Gathering expansion. Theros was released on September 27, 2013, and contained 249 cards. Nykthos, Shrine to Nyx has a rarity of "Rare." The art was done by Jung Park. It has a card number of 223.

Plains serves to provide mana, and as a potential target for Flooded Strand and enemy spells which grant basic lands (i.e. Path to Exile).

Island is a Land, a term that is defined by Rule 305. Specifically, it is an equipment, defined under Rule 301.5 and its subparts. The full text of Rule 305, including all relevant subsections, can be found in Section 6: Lands, herein. Specifically, it is a basic land, defined by Rule 205.4c (Any land with the supertype “basic” is a basic land. Any land that doesn’t have this supertype is a nonbasic land, even if it has a basic land type. Cards printed in sets prior to the Eighth Edition core set didn’t use the word “basic” to indicate a basic land. Cards from those sets with the following names are basic lands and have received errata in the Oracle card reference accordingly: Forest, Island, Mountain, Plains, Swamp, Snow-Covered Forest, Snow-Covered Island, Snow-Covered Mountain, Snow-Covered Plains, and Snow-Covered Swamp.)

Plains have been released in every single set, with multiple artworks per set.

There is no rules text as Plains is a basic land. The implied rules text is: : Add to your mana pool.

Sorceries are a type of spell found in Magic: the Gathering. Creatures are governed by Rule 307, which has been reproduced below.

307.1. A player who has priority may cast a sorcery card from his or her hand during a main phase of his or her turn when the stack is empty. Casting a sorcery as a spell uses the stack. (See rule 601, “Casting Spells.”)

307.2. When a sorcery spell resolves, the actions stated in its rules text are followed. Then it’s put into its owner’s graveyard.

307.3. Sorcery subtypes are always a single word and are listed after a long dash: “Sorcery — Arcane.” Each word after the dash is a separate subtype. The set of sorcery subtypes is the same as the set of instant subtypes; these subtypes are called spell types. Sorceries may have multiple subtypes. See rule 205.3k for the complete list of spell types.

307.4. Sorceries can’t enter the battlefield. If a sorcery would enter the battlefield, it remains in its previous zone instead.

307.5. If a spell, ability, or effect states that a player can do something only “any time he or she could cast a sorcery,” it means only that the player must have priority, it must be during the main phase of his or her turn, and the stack must be empty. The player doesn’t need to have a sorcery he or she could actually cast. Effects that would prevent that player from casting a spell or casting a sorcery don’t affect the player’s capability to perform that action (unless the action is actually casting a spell or casting a sorcery).

307.5a Similarly, if an effect checks to see if a spell was cast “any time a sorcery couldn’t have been cast,” it’s checking only whether the spell’s controller cast it without having priority, during a phase other than his or her main phase, or while another object was on the stack.

Approach of the Second Sun is one of the two primary win conditions for this deck, the second being Azor’s Elocutors. Information regarding Approach of the Second Sun can be found in Section 3.01: Azor’s Elocutors herein.

Approach of the Second Sun costs a total of seven (7) mana to cast. Six () of these mana can be generic mana, , as defined by Rule 107.4b. The full text of Rule 107.4 has been reproduced in Section 3.01: Azor’s Elocutors herein. The remaining mana is White mana, as defined by Rule 107, and . The full text of Rule 107 has been reproduced in Section 3.01: Azor's Elocutors herein. This gives Approach of the Second Sun a converted mana cost of seven (7), pursuant to Rule 202.3. The full text of Rule 202.3 has been reproduced in Section 3.01: Azor's Elocutors herein.

Approach of the Second Sun is a Sorcery, a term that is defined by Rule 307. The full text of Rule 307, including all relevant subsections, can be found in Section 7: Sorceries, herein.

The rules text for Approach of the Second Sun states as follows:

If Approach of the Second Sun was cast from your hand and you've cast another spell named Approach of the Second Sun this game, you win the game. Otherwise, put Approach of the Second Sun into its owner's library seventh from the top and you gain 7 life.

The following rulings have been made regarding Meddling Mage:

April 18, 2017: A card that changes zones is considered a new object, so casting the same Approach of the Second Sun card on a later turn is “another spell” named Approach of the Second Sun.

April 18, 2017: If you have fewer than six cards in your library, you’ll put Approach of the Second Sun on the bottom of your library. Otherwise, you’ll lift up the top six cards without looking at them and place Approach of the Second Sun just under them.

April 18, 2017: The second Approach of the Second Sun that you cast must be cast from your hand, but first may have been cast from anywhere.

April 18, 2017: The second Approach of the Second Sun that you cast must be cast from your hand, but first may have been cast from anywhere.

April 18, 2017: As your second Approach of the Second Sun resolves, it checks only whether the first one was cast, not whether the first one resolved. If your first Approach of the Second Sun was countered, you’ll still win the game as your second one resolves.

April 18, 2017: Approach of the Second Sun has no effect until it’s resolving. If the second one you cast is countered, you won’t win the game.

Approach of the Second Sun was released with the set Amonkhet, the first set in the Amonkhet Block, and the 77th Magic: the Gathering expansion. This set was released on April 28, 2017, and contained 269 cards. Approach of the Second Sun has a rarity of "Rare." It has a card number of 4, and the art was done by Noah Bradley.

Currently, this deck runs no instant speed spells. Should edits to this deck result in the addition of instant spells, this section shall be updated, and all relevant information provided.

If you enjoyed this deck, and want to check out other poorly contrived ideas based around terrible cards, please feel free to check out my other decks:


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Date added 1 year
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This deck is Modern legal.

Cards 60
Avg. CMC 2.71
Folders Cool decks, Modern Things, Interesting Modern Decks, Stuff i like, ideas
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