Parallectric Feedback

Legality

Format Legality
Pre-release Legal
Noble Legal
Leviathan Legal
Tiny Leaders Legal
Magic Duels Legal
Vintage Legal
Modern Legal
Penny Dreadful Legal
Casual Legal
Vanguard Legal
Legacy Legal
Archenemy Legal
Planechase Legal
1v1 Commander Legal
Duel Commander Legal
Unformat Legal
Pauper Legal
Commander / EDH Legal

Printings View all

Set Rarity
Guildpact (GPT) Rare

Combos Browse all

Parallectric Feedback

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Parallectric Feedback deals damage to target spell's controller equal to that spell's converted mana cost.

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Parallectric Feedback Discussion

precociousapprentice on Queen Marchesa: Politics, Aikido, and Control

1 week ago

W3R3PLATYPUS, after looking into some common Mill decks, as well as the decks listed above by Suns_Champion, I think I have an initial recommendation. This comes from the basic premise of this deck, take what they do best, that thing that creates the excess that the deck uses to win, and punish them for it. Unfortunately, I don't yet have a way of doing that suddenly and surprisingly, but that may not matter.

First, it seems like the best Mill decks are actually just combo decks. They set up a situation where a few cards played will Mill the opponent's entire deck, usually utilizing a few key permanents to create a Mill engine that can be made infinite. Many do not have much else for wincons, and basically depend on some amount of overlapping combos. There are a few deck types that use Mill as a secondary win, but many of those are already susceptible to the weapons of this deck, so they are not really as much of a problem. Our pillow fort, our Aikido wins against go wide strategies, and our control should all keep those decks off balance enough already. It seems like the Mill decks that will be the biggest problem are decks that basically ignore the opponent until the wincon combo is assembled. These make our pillow fort mostly useless. They typically utilize some infinite combo for mana by dropping creatures in an infinite loop. This suggests a way to combat them.

First, I don't think that typical Mill protection is really worthwhile. You could play an Eldrazi titan, but it would not otherwise be useful. Cards like Feldon's Cane are a finite solution to what is often an infinite problem, and can't reliably protect you. I suggest that you don't go after either of these strategies.

When facing a dedicated Mill deck, go aggressive. When a deck does best by ignoring the opponent, keep them from ignoring you. Attack. Put the pressure on. Race them to the win. This deck has some speed, so use it. Be proactive. Aggressively remove combo pieces, both from the battlefield as well as out of the deck with Hide/Seek. Take out central combo pieces and hamstring them. Even if they have backup combos, make it harder to stumble into a combo. Try to get Solitary Confinement out to keep from being targeted. Without even changing things in the deck, you can change how you typically play, and and you can punish them for their typical game plan.

For changes to the list that are good options, changes that will make the deck good against more than just mill, I would suggest playing cards that punish creatures coming into play. Suture Priest, Trespasser's Curse, Rampaging Ferocidon are all powerful against many strategies, and with any of those out, you can basically shut down almost all of the Mill combos in the listed decks, as well as most of the mill strategies in many of the decks I looked at. The decks that could be created without a creature cycle typically use infinite mana for an large X spell. You could try Parallectric Feedback for these decks. Lastly, you could play Island Sanctuary to elect not to draw on your draw step. This could be used as a pillow fort card, but would also allow you to keep playing even with no cards in your deck.

In any case, I think that Mill is a pretty corner case strategy that is hard to make work very consistently, they are mostly non-interactive combo decks with an infinite Mill wincon, and going aggressive to put them on a short clock, playing some pillow fort that protects against Mill, being proactive about eliminating the combo pieces with your control, and adding a few cards that work on multiple strategies but that will kill their ability to go infinite, that should help take care of Mill.

Also Suns_Champion, I think that your losses potentially are a result of the fact that combo, especially Mill, is often stronger against a single opponent since they don't have to outrace multiple players all at once, and this deck is often weaker against a single opponent since there is no offense to piggyback before the non-damage wincon is dropped. This deck was never meant to play under these conditions. Going 2-3 in this situation with a deck that you had never played is actually surprisingly good. I am not discouraged by your performance at all. Nice work. Try adding another opponent or two and I bet the balance shifts dramatically.

precociousapprentice on Queen Marchesa: Politics, Aikido, and Control

8 months ago

I can't see Parallectric Feedback regularly doing more than 6 damage. I don't think that will be enough to do it. Sin Prodder would alert the opposition to my plans and resources, which would be an almost guaranteed loss. I had never considered Eight-and-a-Half-Tails, but I am not sure it gives me enough protection for the mana cost needed. I will have to think about it. Gonti's Machinations is an interesting card I had never seen. I am not sure that the swing is enough to make it worth it. Exsanguinate is a very similar card, but with a much higher potential. I am not sure why I would chose Gonti's Machinations over Exsanguinate or it's variations, aside from the small Rattlesnake effect.

Ucenna on Queen Marchesa: Politics, Aikido, and Control

8 months ago

Okay, that makes sense.

For me Stinkweed Imp is a must. My playgroup plays a lot of fliers, and Stinkweed Imp is a solid rattlesnake that I can get back whenever I want.

Dictate has served me well in my play tests. Cast it end of turn and then through everything you've got into your next turn.

Thoughts on the Eiganjo Castle, Shizo, Death's Storehouse, and Shinka, the Bloodsoaked Keep? I run Shinka because deathtouch + first strike is nice to have. The others might be worth considering, and Shizo can be another Key to the City.

Reflect Damage is a card I'm trying out but haven't cast yet. It's not very mana efficient, but it has more versatility than others. It makes Windstorm effects almost instakills.

I'm not running Necropotence, mostly because I don't really enjoy the card. Instead I run Sin Prodder. My deck is a bit more aggressive than yours, and I appreciate being able to sneak the extra damage in when I can.

Another card that I can't decide about is Eight-and-a-Half-Tails. It provides solid pillowforting and permanent protection abilities as well as evasion, but it's rather mana intensive. Still, it has a lot of versatility.

I've also been using Gonti's Machinations. I know it's not great, but it provides a little bit of discouragement and affords me a lot of life gain. And sometimes that 3 damage is exactly what I need to close out the game. Yesterday it won me 1 game, and would have won me another if it hadn't been O-Ringed.

Also, Parallectric Feedback?

Grixs on Updates to Tariel!

2 years ago

http://tappedout.net/mtg-decks/tariel-the-shadow-of-heaven/

So I upgraded my land game quite a bit and added more instant spells for more interaction. I was looking make things a bit more interesting than just using several Doom Blade-esque intances. So things Parallectric Feedback to stop a giant Fireball or Comet Storm, and Blood Oath for when my group plays Nekusar, the Mindrazer or Niv-Mizzet, the Firemind decks. Please check it out and let me know what you think.