Tier5 (250)

Tier4 (212)

Commander

Tier3 (121)

Tier2 (21)

Tier2.5 (20)

Tier1.5 (15)

Tier1 (8)

Banned (5)


Description

This is an updated version of the list created by pmonk requested by a lot of people on the original deck. There is also a modification of the description of the tiers to better suit multiplayer EDH.

Welcome to this list! I first want to tell you an important thing: many people consider commander as a casual format. While this is true, there are also some that think it can still be quite competitive. This list is not the only truth, because many thing can influence the power of a deck in addition to it's commander (politics is a thing), even more in multiplayer. So please don't hate because the commander you like is not ranked as you wuold do it. Instead, write a comment below to try to convince me and other people to change it.

If you see a missing commander, please tell me and I will add it ASAP!

  1. Please do not comment for your own commanders (commanders you run). Your comments will be biased by the fact you play it. If you think a commander you run deserves a better place, say it in the comments and let other people judge it. According to this rule, here are the commanders I won't judge by myself: Kozilek, Butcher of Truth.

  2. No hate! People are here to argue, discuss and "define" to power level of certain commanders in multiplayer EDH, a CASUAL format. Everyone's opinion will be different, so please stay polite and argue like everybody else in the comment section. I reserve the right to delete any hate or bad comment.

  3. Please use this only to discuss only about the power level of commanders. If I base myself onto the old list, there might be a lot of comments, so there is no need to add unuseful ones. I reserve the right to delete those comments.

  4. Do not advertise your decks here. If you use this deck to advertise your own, I reserve the right to delete your comment if it is not for the purpose of an explanation about a commander. But don't be afraid to post links to your decks/other decks if it is to support your explanations! The only thing I don't want is people coming and posting "Hey check out my The Mimeoplasm tier 1 deck!" and stuff like that.

Tier 1

These decks are the most powerful decks in the format. The combo decks can go off on turns 3-5, the stax decks get a lock on turns 3-4, and hybrid decks get a disruption engine by turn 2-4. They will commonly be seen at competitive tables, and players should know how to combat them. They are resilient, pack protection and backup plans, and take dedicated hate to truly counter. Never underestimate these decks, as they are the strongest in the format.

Tier 2

Less powerful than the tier 1 decks, but still quite strong, these can definitely hold their own against tier 1 decks. They are usually a turn slower than tier 1 decks, or they have consistency problems.

Tier 3

This is the middle tier. They can't usually compete against tier 1 decks, but might do fine with tier 2 decks. They usually have "the Aggro Problem," or they are wildly inconsistent. Most of the "pubstomp" decks that dominate casual meta go in here. They may have a bad reputation, but that doesnt' make them tier 1.

Tier 4

These decks are somewhat weak. They have trouble winning in competitive metas, but may do well in casual games. They need a very favorable meta and a very lucky hand to win against decks like Zur.

Tier 5

Janky generals that can't win often in competitive metas. Vanilla generals fit in here, as well as stuff like Gallowbraid. They usually can't do much. Those commanders mainly are used as placeholders or simply to fly under the radar with a strategy that doesn't requires your commander.

Archetype Descriptions

Combo: Resilient, recurrable combos, usually with a backup plan, and that packs protection. These decks run cards that "combo" with each other to get a game-winning boardstate (Mimeoplasm), infinite tokens and draw (Prossh), or just downright win the game (Doomsday). Decks will pack lots of acceleration in order to power out the combo.

Stax: Speedy lockdowns, usually with a combo finish or beatdown strategy, that packs redundancy and tutors to counter other gameplans. These decks will play cards like Static Orb and Stasis to slow down opponents, while having some way to break resource parity, whether by blinking permanents (Brago), or untapping lands (Derevi). They can easily lock down the board, and proceed to win with either beatdown or a combo finish.

Hybrid: Disruption, silver bullets, and hatebears make these decks powerful. They will usually pack a combo, but won't play it out as quickly, opting instead to disrupt other gameplans with cards like Cursed Totem and Phyrexian Revoker. They can be tuned to local metas, packing specific hate cards against powerful decks. These decks can win quickly or play the long game.

Control: Cheap counterspells, good disruption, and a powerful draw engine. This archetype is usually considered to be one of the weaker ones, as having enough counterspells to fight an entire table is tough. Each counterspell is card disadvantage (1:1/3), so this must be offset by a powerful draw engine in the command zone. Azami and Damia are two examples of decks that have enough sheer card draw to get the counterspells they need.