Glacial Chasm

Glacial Chasm

Land

Cumulative upkeep-Pay 2 life. (At the beginning of your upkeep, put an age counter on this permanent, then sacrifice it unless you pay its upkeep cost for each age counter on it.)

When Glacial Chasm enters the battlefield, sacrifice a land.

Creatures you control can't attack.

Prevent all damage that would be dealt to you.

Latest Decks as Commander

Glacial Chasm Discussion

A55Destroyer69 on The Marit Lage Life

6 days ago

honestly going RG base with a WU splash is what I find to be the best. You have access to things like Academy Ruins and Hall of Heliod's Generosity to get back your milled moxen or Exploration s as you need.

Anyway, I would argue that, even with no black mana in the deck, that Smokestack is much less powerful than Nether Void in most matchups. Dredge will still function, of course, but will not be able to cast too many spells. Even something like Sphere of Resistance is a better alternative. The worst matchup for lands is Storm, so making them have to start sacrificing their lands after they've probably already gone off and killed you seems pretty impractical. Sphere of Resistance makes them need to deal with it before even thinking of going off, since the entire power of storm bases itself around making enough mana to go off, rather than making overly excessive amounts, so leeching 1 mana per spell seems really strong (and it is in practise, too)

I also find that 4 Dark Depths and 4 Thespian's Stage are both sort of overkill, as when you're functioning fully you're effectively drawing 3 cards per turn with loam putting the top 3 cards of your deck into your bin. I do find that Field of the Dead is a really good alternative too, and even against 1 lands spy or manaless dredge or whatnot you can still make a board with it - wasteland your own things and replay them through the power of loam. It's really sketchy, but if that's all you can do then so be it. It does give you quite a boardstate quite quickly in any case.

Propaganda is a much worse version of Glacial Chasm , and yes glacial chasm has a cumulative upkeep cost, but if you have loam and Exploration available then you can just sit and control the board with Punishing Fire s to chip down your opponent and their boardstate. If you have another exploration out then you can advance your own boardstate althewhile too.

BrassLord on Spiritual Guidance

3 weeks ago

For sure can be a headache to deal with! Any sword of X and Y would be good. If ever there was a deck to run Armageddon , I think this would be it. Your commander's low curve and the ability to spam out tokens means that once you resolve it, you're going to be able to rebuild faster than most other decks. Also, Luminarch Ascension can quickly turn into a win condition after you play one of your multiple board wipes.

I would recommend Maze of Ith and like Glacial Chasm , but at 33 lands, I think you need all the mana you can get!

Lhurgyof on BLRM (Bureau of Land and Resource Management)

3 weeks ago

Have you considered Fall of the Thran , Cataclysm , Restore Balance , Magus of the Balance , and/or Storm Cauldron ? All are fun stax/land destruction pieces.

Constant Mists and Glacial Chasm might be good stall pieces until you can get a win-con going.

+1, cool deck. Reminds me of my Jund take on land destruction:


Terra Solutus

Commander / EDH Lhurgyof

SCORE: 5 | 5 COMMENTS | 902 VIEWS | IN 3 FOLDERS


DemMeowsephs on Forger of burn

4 weeks ago

Hey there! Here are some suggestions.

Jack32226 on Rot and Ruin (Muldrotha EDH)

1 month ago

As an added note about the Glacial Chasm deliberation, Glacial Chasm only protects yourself from damage, whereas Spore Frog can protect anyone from combat damage if you choose to do so. This can be important for political reasons, but is also important for "whenever [creature] deals combat damage to a player" triggers. It might seem like a small detail, but my meta has an Inalla, Archmage Ritualist deck that aims to take infinite turns through Wanderwine Prophets . With Frog, this game plan is stopped in its tracks, whereas Glacial Chasm still allows that player to take several extra turns to find an answer and win by simply attacking other players. Not applicable to everyone (and I don't play against the deck every game), but it's still some food for thought.

MLS91 on Relics of Fear

1 month ago

Profet93

I'm thinking of just cutting the Glacial Chasm for a Swamp , i hasn't saved me in the one set of three games, and I don't really think that i'll truly be needing it in the future. it was there for assuming the role of archenemy, can be not paid sac'd then replayed with Crucible of Worlds creating a small lock of sorts.

My friend was the one that suggested Oblivion Sower , I like the idea of ripping lands with it, as well as it's awkward 5/8 body. I do think its a little though and reaching into the casual realm which isn't really what im looking to do.

Bitter Ordeal can technically combo with the Lotus Petal loop and exile everyones Libraries(also less color intensive), but again, i'm looking at dream land. but it sounds really nice!

After some deliberation here's what I've come to:

Minus Dreamstealer plus Opposition Agent

Why: better value, answers answers

Minus Glacial Chasm plus Swamp

Why: need access to more colored mana, land count ins fine. Chasm doesn't currently do anything and doesn't tap for mana

Minus Metalworker plus Varragoth, Bloodsky Sire

Why: Metalworker is a good card, the idea pf it still works for the deck, but it requires to much set up, Varragoth i'm hoping "gets us there" also makes the deck "possibly"

Jack32226 on Rot and Ruin (Muldrotha EDH)

1 month ago

Thank you for the suggestions kpres!

I'll go ahead and say that a few of the cards you suggested are cards I've already been considering. Many of the other cards are cards that I don't include for meta reasons. I'll try to explain my thoughts on these cards in the order you suggested them.

Also, as a quick disclaimer, I should explain something a little counter-intuitive about the deck. In my deliberations of the cards you suggested, I often bring up tempo issues with mana costs being too high. Although this deck's goal is to make very large amounts of mana for X spells, I am attempting to do so in a relatively fast-paced meta. Intuitively, high costed cards shouldn't be an issue if I plan to make lots of mana. However, I can only afford to spend large amounts of mana once I've reached a critical mass of ramp. Once I reach that critical mass, the deck wants to win as soon as possible via X spells. Due to that fact, the deck is pretty polarized with how much mana I spend on any one card. For the most part, I don't like investing any more than four mana for a card before hitting that critical mass (the biggest exception being Muldrotha if I can afford it) and, of those cards, they should be immediately impactful or help to reach that critical mass. Once I reach the critical mass, then the new plan becomes dumping 10+ mana into powerful game winning cards.

Kodama of the East Tree - This card is definitely powerful and I highly suggest it for more casual metas! Unfortunately for my meta, it's a little too slow. As you said, it could replace something for putting down extra lands. What options I have now though are either low cost (and can therefore be acknowledged as early game ramp), or serves a second purpose such as card draw. I think this card shines more in creature-based strategies, where cheating things in directly pressures your opponents rather than bides for time. For this deck however, where many of my removal options are low-costed anyway, the six mana investment for Kodama doesn't pay off nearly as fast as I would like.

Second Chance - My original list had Second Chance with Necropotence to bring me down to 5 life. While this is certainly effective, personally I found that it wasn't a fun way to win (for me or my opponents). Not much of a criticism, I know. If I had to criticize it though, its main downside is that it's a completely dead card until it wins. It can even be a liability against less experienced opponents who might rush to kill you out of panic. It's certainly still a good win condition; it's not in my deck out of personal preference.

Glacial Chasm - I've been considering this card for a long while now as a replacement for Spore Frog . It covers the frog's two weaknesses: not being able to fog multiple opponents and not preventing noncombat damage. The reason I haven't included it thus far is because contrary to frog, Glacial Chasm is not a neutral deterrent. Whether you pay the cumulative upkeep or replay it by saccing a land, you are paying a price. For my particular meta, combat is mostly meant for small amounts of chip damage rather than large attacks. For that reason, frog simply sitting on the board is enough to stop that incoming damage; there's not much reason to replay it. The only exception to that is a dastardly Kaalia of the Vast deck I play against, but frog is a good enough answer for that deck. It's a bit of a tossup for this list whether it's worth running, but in other metas it might be a good idea to run both.

Tormod, the Desecrator - If you're playing a creature-based deck or if you want a more drawn-out win con this card is pretty decent. However in this deck, it doesn't quite fit the theme. With a lack of sac outlets, the card doesn't synergize with most of the deck either.

Insidious Dreams - You're absolutely right about the synergy with Windfall , it's very powerful in most metas. My one gripe with the card, and the reason why I can't run it in my meta, is discarding is part of the cost. Unfortunately, there is way too much counter magic for me to play this reliably. Paying four mana to One with Nothing myself would be too common an occurrence.

Forgotten Creation - A good alternative to Jace's Archivist . I can't really justify running both though, I don't find myself needing wheels all that often. The reason I run Archivist instead of this is flexibility. Archivist can be used anytime rather than just at your upkeep, it can interrupt your opponents' hands at instant speed, and it shuts down your opponents when combined with Narset, Parter of Veils or Notion Thief . Otherwise, Forgotten Creation is a great card and is perfectly viable for Muldrotha.

Skull Prophet - I can't say I'm a fan of ramp spells that require decent fixing to cast. Simply because of that, I feel all the ramp I'm currently running is good enough to make up for the mill. I will admit though that at the time of this comment I have Coiling Oracle in the deck, which is somewhat hypocritical. I hope to revise the deck soon though, and I plan to take Oracle out.

Night Incarnate - Another card I've been on the fence about for a while. As I've mentioned, there isn't necessarily a whole lot of combat in my meta, and of the decks that do use combat, none of them use a "go wide" strategy. The impact of Night Incarnate then is not as big as I usually would like. That being said, there are still a number of value engines and mana dorks that this card does remove. I can certainly imagine adding the card to the deck in the future if I start encountering more small creatures in my meta.

Tunnel Vision - Tunnel Vision is certainly a fun card, but it's a little too slow for my taste. This is especially clear when you compare it to Hermit Druid . Hermit Druid can be used repeatedly, can mill my whole library so long as I fetch all my basics, and can be immediately useful even if I don't have Muldrotha (since the basic land goes to my hand rather than the top of my library). Hermit Druid also costs 2 mana and can be replayed with Muldrotha if need be. In more casual metas, Tunnel Vision can be used more effectively, but I would still recommend Hermit Druid over it if you're not including both.

Sewer Nemesis - I don't like this card for a few reasons. For four mana, I think the card is overcosted. The mill effect is not very substantial, requiring you to cast several spells to make good use of it (and if you have the ability to cast that many spells, you're probably in a really good place anyway). Probably the biggest problem I have with it is that it doesn't have any form of evasion, so opponents can easily chump block it. Also, in a meta with plenty of graveyard hate, this creature can be removed from the board very efficiently. For your own deck, I would actually recommend Splinterfright as a replacement. It only gets bigger from creature cards, but I think the addition of trample more than makes up for it.

Raven's Crime - Now here's a card I haven't actually considered before. Looking at it now though, I really like it. The only potential downside is that my meta (especially with that Kaalia player I mentioned before), has a habit of running lots of recursion effects like Reanimate and Animate Dead that greatly benefit from being able to discard large creatures from hand. In spite of that, Raven's Crime is low costed, has great synergy with the rest of the deck, and can disrupt opponents effectively. I'll have to pick myself up a copy and playtest it. It's not really a clear upgrade to any one card in the deck, so I'd have to think about what to take out for it.

Magus of the Will - I like Magus, but not for the reason you specified. I feel like I have enough recursion effects for my X spells as is. What I like about Magus though, is that it provides an earlier, cheaper alternative to Muldrotha for a turn. It's not uncommon that I have to go a while without casting Muldrotha because I can't afford to dump 6 mana into her. The reason I haven't included it thus far is because of the exile clause for cards entering your graveyard that turn, and that it is still rather expensive to use this card. It's still a 6 mana investment, just split across two different turns. As it stands, it's a good tech card, but in practice it's a bit of an awkward card to set up. Spending 3 mana with no immediate effect is usually bad, but if you don't do that, you can't use the card immediately for an emergency. For that reason I haven't included it, but I would still recommend it for other Muldrotha players.

spellshaper.quixote on Exploding Waifu Simulator

1 month ago

The big players in the deck are definitely Bonus Round and Finale of Promise , either of which is usually enough to completely change the direction of the game. Pulling off the Brash Taunter and Blazing Sunsteel combo is also funny whenever it happens, but the playgroup's started to catch wise to the idea that they shouldn't let Taunter or Stuffy Doll hang around unmolested. Though one of my favorite plays actually led to a draw--a Xantcha player had thrown Phyresis onto her and there was no way I was going to win...so I hit her with Arcbond and then dropped Blasphemous Act to take everyone else with me.

While I get the idea behind both Glacial Chasm and Fortune Thief , the reality has been that I'm rarely setting off a symmetrical explosion large enough to take me out of the game. In those cases when Ashling does get sizeable, lifelink from Basilisk Collar or Shadowspear has always been enough to solve the issue. Since lifelink isn't a triggered ability any more since M10, you gain that life at the exact same time damage is dealt, so your life total is never seen to hit zero.

I actually did have Leyline Tyrant in a prior version of the list, but didn't really feel like it was pulling its weight. It was never the card in hand that I most wanted to cast, and after it resolved I rarely had so little to do with my mana that there was much left to bank. Obviously, it pairs very nicely with Braid of Fire , but that was never a consistent enough occurrence to make up for the number of times that it was a dead card that died to Ashling herself half of the time. Because of that, I never really considered Horizon Stone , but the stone not being a creature may make it worth revisiting.

Toralf, God of Fury  Flip is a possible inclusion that I've gone back and forth on. On the one hand, he could add up to a decent chunk of additional damage over the course of a game (assuming he doesn't himself die to Ashling too early), and could possibly just wipe out the rest of the table if onboard for a Blasphemous Act . On the other hand, so much of what the deck focuses on is the spellslinging angle, with Ashling serving more as a deterrent and repeatable boardwipe than a win condition. He's definitely on my short list, but I'll need to get in a few more games to feel out whether the latest changes leave any obvious cuts for him.

Birgi, God of Storytelling  Flip is in a similar boat to Toralf, albeit with more of the uncertainty tied up in her lower toughness. Both of her sides are useful, both for the effective cost reduction on her front face and the card cash-in from Harnfel, but I simply haven't been able to figure out what to cut.

Load more