Time Stop

Time Stop

Instant

End the turn. (Remove all spells and abilities on the stack from the game, including this card. The player whose turn it is discards down to his or her maximum hand size. Damage wears off, and "this turn" and "until end of turn" effects end.)

Browse Alters View at Gatherer

Printings View all

Set Rarity
Tenth Edition (10E) Rare
Champions of Kamigawa (CHK) Rare

Combos Browse all

Legality

Format Legality
Tiny Leaders Legal
Noble Legal
Leviathan Legal
Magic Duels Legal
Canadian Highlander Legal
Vintage Legal
Modern Legal
Block Constructed Legal
Vanguard Legal
Legacy Legal
Archenemy Legal
Planechase Legal
1v1 Commander Legal
Duel Commander Legal
Oathbreaker Legal
Unformat Legal
Casual Legal
Commander / EDH Legal

Time Stop occurrence in decks from the last year

Commander / EDH:

All decks: 0.01%

Time Stop Discussion

ThoAlmighty on Mishra's Workshop

2 weeks ago

I feel like Praetor's Grasp is a solid include, and I don’t think they typing of the totem makes up for how much cheaper PG is, and that you can hold onto it makes it a lot better IMO. I’d at least try and find space for both. I don’t see a lot of draw, so good old Vedalken Archmage might be worth a slot. Also, how well does Time Stop play for you? I used to run it in a deck but cut it because it was too hard to hold up the mana.

Tzefick on Pattern Recognition #136 - Counters

1 month ago

I think counter magic is perfectly fine as a concept. It's a way to deal with issues, before they actually become an issue and it examplifies one of blue's main weaknesses: Difficulty in dealing with the board. I used to hate counterspells when I got into Magic again (during Lorwyn, damn Faeries), as they simply seem like a disability to play the game; "I want to play something." - "You may not". I have since accepted their place in the game and their importance.

The reason I still do dislike counter magic is because it exists to provide a strength to cover a weakness. A weakness that since then has been partially filled out by strong answers to the board over the course of Magic's history. One of the main offenders is Cyclonic Rift , especially present in Commander and other multiplayer formats that are significantly slower than Duel Magic (1 on 1). Other offenders are cards that really should be enchantments, but opted for a more nefarious although simpler route: Curse of the Swine and Reality Shift , and their predecessors; Pongify and Rapid Hybridization .

As said by Berry in the article; Blue has the ability to change something from one thing to another. We have also seen various types of such polymorphing done in enchantment form; Darksteel Mutation , Lignify , Frogify . All of this makes perfect sense in what blue is capable of doing.

However doing a change irreversibly like the Curse of the Swine or Reality Shift, is giving hard answers to a color whose weakness is hard answers - at least on the board. Yeah, you replace them with a creature, but a much weaker creature and if a token, one you can permanently remove by having it change zone.


Another issue with counter magic is the tempo shift. The opponent casts a 5 mana spell, you cast a 2-3 mana counter spell. Suddenly there's a disparity of 2-3 mana in the counterspeller's favor. It is mainly equalized because the blue player must have ready mana, resulting in that player not developing their own board state. However that can again be offset by utilizing instant speed spells or abilities that either advance board state or card draw for the blue player.

If the blue player didn't have these chances to apply disparity in mana spent and benefit, the color would struggle to have meaningful strengths, I know that. However the issue is in finding the fine line between how much mana disparity is acceptable. The cat is out of the bag on this one, as there have already been printed numerous versions of unconditional counterspells that have set a precedent for what blue counterspells are allowed to do and how cheaply.


If you compare a counterspell to a destroy spell, the main difference is obviously zone of application and also timing of application. One proactive, one reactive (well actually both are reactive, but you probably know why I have to make a distinction). Reactive spells provide a lot more flexibility in when you're required to use them. Their main problem is that sometimes reactive spells are too late to cause the same mana disparity that a counterspell does. As soon as that permanent hits the battlefield, an ability may come into effect, be it triggered, static or active. A reactive spell cannot avoid that.

Also take into account that blue can deal with any spell in existence, with the possible exception of spells with Split Second, specifically designed to be uninteractive - and still they can be interacted with . If there's a spell that is uncounterable, you can get creative with Venser, Shaper Savant , Time Stop , Mindbreak Trap , Ashiok's Erasure , there's load of ways to get around "uncounterable". Blue is also the color that will straight up see a threat on the board and simply take it for themselves, with Control Magic , Gather Specimens , Blatant Thievery , Expropriate . Effectively a removal, card draw and threat all in one.

No other color can boast the same catch all mechanic. White comes close for something in the same ballpark, but it is still just a bleak imitation - as countermagic goes. And evidently look at that price tag.


In the earlier days of Magic, blue was not the only user of countermagic. I feel like you could provide other colors with more conditional types of countermagic, to better even it out. And not just anti countermagic like Guttural Response . Blue would still be the best, but not the sole user. - White is a color that protects itself, so something like Hindering Light is the most likely avenue to take White Countermagic, anything that touches my stuff - go away. Think Equinox in terms of templating but not necessarily that specific. Giving their spells on the stack protection from a color or supertype or plain "old" Hexproof. - Green already has an affinity to provide hexproof to their stuff, Heroic Intervention and Veil of Summer , so expanding on that seems reasonable. - Red could go the Fork / Shunt route but is unlikely to get countermagic that straight up nullifies other types of spells than spells with targets. - Black is kinda difficult. The usual is just to tack an alternative payment of life, cards or permanents on an otherwise Blue card. Black already have an indirect proactive answer through selective discard, like Duress . The issue is these are all sorcery speed, so if an opponent suddenly starts drawing a lot of cards, it can be difficult for black to be proactive in time. So perhaps just providing Duress at instant speed through a condition would be acceptable. Something like "Instant Duress may be cast as an instant if an opponent has drawn two or more cards this turn." / "Instant Duress may be cast as an instant if the target opponent has 5 or more cards in hand". Any kind of variation on that.

Of course some would talk about color pie bleeding/breaking, but ain't that already happening by giving blue hard removal (by proxy) and large scale soft board removal? I know some of these issues are mainly aimed at multiplayer formats, but we cannot ignore that Magic has grown to be something else than only Duel Magic (1 on 1). Blue's counter magic is here to stay, but is it too much to ask that the other colors can get even slightly in on the action if not directly, then indirectly by interacting more with the stack?

Green has one of the best palettes available to them for a slightly slower format; mana ramp, card draw, large threats, ability to scale well, protective measures, explosive finishers and a hell lot of combo potential and pieces.

I think Green is only beaten slightly by Black in terms of Commander due to tutors in a singleton format. And because Black can cheat mana costs or pays differently, has access to card draw and good finishers, along many more combo pieces.

Blue is one of the only colors that reliably can stop combo or finishers dead in their tracks. Reversibly, they are the color best suited to keep those combos or finishers uninterrupted. They have the best access to card advantage and resource manipulation. And extra turns.

There's a reason that many cEDH decks are mainly some variation of Sultai colors (Green, black and blue) with maybe one added color or full WUBRG. I think this picture would be more diverse, if more colors became able to interact better. The ability to interact is one of the core foundations and strengths of Magic. Counter magic is a pillar of this interaction, more colors should find a way to do it or something similar.

theThane on riku of two reflections edh

1 month ago

Now we get to the hard part. What to cut. Let's start with what doesn't mesh with the theme of spell copying; Teferi, Mage of Zhalfir and Glen Elendra Archmage are both better served in a combo/control shell where you need to protect a specific series of cards, the benefit of spell copying is the flexibility and resilience to allow some things to miss because everything becomes a game ender once its been copied a couple of times; Brudiclad, Telchor Engineer and Second Harvest are designed for HEAVY token decks where you're making ALOT of small tokens in concert with a few threatening ones; Animar, Soul of Elements , Fathom Mage , Temur Ascendancy , and Warstorm Surge are all good for a creature focused strategy, but for a SPELL copy deck most of our creatures exist to accelerate our mana ( dorks , Goblin Electromancer , and STE ) or as silver bullets for specific problems ( Terastodon , Acidic Slime , and Bane of Progress ) which tend to be too small of a portion of our deck or too small stat-wise to use these effects to their fullest; Krosan Grip cannot be copied because of split second; Time Stop is so niche you're better off running Counterflux ; Melek, Izzet Paragon is just bad,I love him but he's too inconsistent and without alot of top-deck manipulation ( Sensei's Divining Top , Sylvan Library , Mirri's Guile , Scroll Rack ) you can't reliably get the spells you want to copy; Verdant Confluence is easily the weakest of the confluences in these colors and none of its effects are particularly spectacular even after one or two copies; Starstorm is a very expensive Blasphemous Act with cycling; Brainstorm is the weakest card draw spell you have and never feels good unless it's setting up a Kefnet combo.

Tzefick on Pattern Recognition #134 - Mercadian ...

2 months ago

Surprised I haven't seen Rhystic Study mentioned already or that Rhystic was a theme in Prophecy experimenting with getting an effect cheaply or repeatably at the expense of giving your opponent a simple countermeasure of a mana tax.

I first experienced MtG in the Onslaught block, but I was too young and English is not my mother tongue, so I quickly dipped out again, having only gotten a handful of booster packs (although I kept them, including a Polluted Delta ). I came back and found new joy during the Lorwyn mini-blocks and stuck to it afterwards, but mainly as a casual player.

I have no relationship with Masques as a block and only know pieces of the sets. As such I'm largely indifferent to the set as constructed goes, but there definitely are quite a few gems between the cards. As a block, I'd say Kamigawa is more forgettable for me, as there are very few cards from that block that I have seen used in other formats - both Extended (predecessor of Modern) and in EDH/Commander. And that said even knowing that Sakura-Tribe Elder , Kodama's Reach , Sensei's Divining Top , Azusa, Lost but Seeking , Azami, Lady of Scrolls , Kiki-Jiki, Mirror Breaker and Umezawa's Jitte were all from Kamigawa. I just don't associate Kamigawa with most of these cards.

Huh, Ghostly Prison , Gifts Ungiven , Glimpse of Nature , Heartbeat of Spring , Nature's Will , Pithing Needle , Time Stop and Tomorrow, Azami's Familiar are likewise from Kamigawa. That block really didn't stick much with me. But that's actually a substantial amount of cards used in multiple formats. I guess I just never associated them with their original printing block.

Anyway, Masques have a few interesting utility choices and I don't consider it the worst block/set. The gems are mostly utility though and not power houses nor build-arounds.

Fellin22 on Just sit back and relax

3 months ago

Time Stop . thats all.

SynergyBuild on Worst Format Ever

5 months ago

Go ahead and replace Merchant Scroll with Enter the Infinite , I am sorry I missed that, in my last post. BTW use Time Stop when you used it to go off, and forget the cantrip part!

Rhadamanthus on Sundial of the infinite interactions

7 months ago

dragonstryke58 already gave the details, but here they are again: The End Phase has two steps - the end step and the cleanup step. When you use an effect like Sundial of the Infinite or Time Stop to end the turn, the game skips straight to the beginning of the cleanup step. Effects that last "until end of turn" or "this turn" wear off at the beginning of the cleanup step, meaning the last ability on Neheb, Dreadhorde Champion ends. The mana won't stay in your pool after the cleanup step ends.

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