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Said on How does double ......

#1

Not sure if this is more elegant, but according to the rules:

If there are any creatures with first strike or double strike at the beginning of the combat damage step, the only creatures that will deal damage in that combat damage step will be those creatures with first strike or double strike.

Then after that (first) combat damage step, instead of going to the end of combat step, a second combat damage step happens. During this step, only remaining creatures with double strike and remaining creatures that did not have first or double strike as the first combat damage step began will do damage during this step.

After the second combat damage step, you proceed to the end of combat step.

702.4b If at least one attacking or blocking creature has first strike (see rule 702.7) or double strike as the combat damage step begins, the only creatures that assign combat damage in that step are those with first strike or double strike. After that step, instead of proceeding to the end of combat step, the phase gets a second combat damage step. The only creatures that assign combat damage in that step are the remaining attackers and blockers that had neither first strike nor double strike as the first combat damage step began, as well as the remaining attackers and blockers that currently have double strike. After that step, the phase proceeds to the end of combat step.

TL;DR: Double strike creates two combat damage steps where the creature with double strike will assign damage in both those steps (if it had double strike as the first combat damage step occurs).

Also, if there is a creature with last strike or triple strike, there will be a third combat damage step, but unless you are using Un-sets, you won't need to worry about this.

July 17, 2019 5:43 p.m.

Please link all cards in your question using double brackets.

Finale of Eternity

Cabal Paladin

Finale of Eternity is not affected by Cabal Paladin 's triggered ability. The trigger ability cares if a historic spell is cast. A historic spell is any artifact, legendary, or saga spell. Finale of Eternity is not historic.

700.6. The term historic refers to an object that has the legendary supertype, the artifact card type, or the Saga subtype.

Even if Finale of Eternity was a historic spell, you are correct in assuming that it would not cause Cabal Paladin to trigger because the spell was already cast and is in the process of resolution.

701.4. Cast

  • 701.4a To cast a spell is to take it from the zone it’s in (usually the hand), put it on the stack, and pay its costs, so that it will eventually resolve and have its effect. A player may cast a spell if they have priority. See rule 601, “Casting Spells.”
  • 701.4b To cast a card is to cast it as a spell.
July 11, 2019 7:20 p.m. Edited.

Said on Karn, the great ......

#3

On a related note: The Ixalan transform lands like Primal Wellspring will not die as they have a CMC of their front face.

July 8, 2019 3:33 p.m.

Said on Gorm the Great ......

#4

@Sarkhan420X: Please reread the rules I referenced. Both Flying and Menace are restrictions on what can block them.

Creatures without flying do not have an ability that says that they can't block flying creatures. It is the restriction of the flying creature which prevents them from blocking.

Also, your example of Reflecting Pool and Vivid Crag does not apply to this situation. Vivid Crag has two abilities, one which can produce red and one which can produce any color. Just because you do not have a counter, doesn't mean the second ability can't produce any color of mana. It means you just can't activate the ability.

July 6, 2019 3:37 p.m.

Said on Gorm the Great ......

#5

The reason (and it may be a bad reason) I said that Camouflage doesn't skip the declare blockers step and instead modifies it is because the turn does not go directly from the declare attackers step to the combat damage step. You still have to finish the declare attacker step, passing priority to move to the next step or phase. However, the next step is not the combat damage step as would happen if you skipped the declare blockers step. You would need to apply the replacement ability created by Camouflage .

506.1. The combat phase has five steps, which proceed in order: beginning of combat, declare attackers, declare blockers, combat damage, and end of combat. The declare blockers and combat damage steps are skipped if no creatures are declared as attackers or put onto the battlefield attacking (see rule 508.8). There are two combat damage steps if any attacking or blocking creature has first strike (see rule 702.7) or double strike (see rule 702.4).

You cannot say that you apply the effect of Camouflage on either the declare attackers or combat damage step because that is not the step you would declare blockers.

Also, like one of the most used explanations in MTG says: "Things in Magic do exactly what they say." In this case, I reason that Camouflage does not skip the declare blockers step since it does not say "skip". It uses "instead" which is a replacement effect that modifies the event occurring. Camouflage replaces the declaration of blocker with another event not skips the declare blockers step altogether.

614.1a Effects that use the word “instead” are replacement effects. Most replacement effects use the word “instead” to indicate what events will be replaced with other events.

614.1b Effects that use the word “skip” are replacement effects. These replacement effects use the word “skip” to indicate what events, steps, phases, or turns will be replaced with nothing.

July 6, 2019 3:24 p.m.

Said on Gorm the Great ......

#6

@Sarkhan420X: Flying and Menace are comparable. According to the MTG Comprehensive Rules:

702.9b A creature with flying can’t be blocked except by creatures with flying and/or reach. A creature with flying can block a creature with or without flying. (See rule 509, “Declare Blockers Step,” and rule 702.17, “Reach.”)

702.110b A creature with menace can’t be blocked except by two or more creatures. (See rule 509, “Declare Blockers Step.”)

As I said before, both are keyword abilities that restrict what can block them. When checking the legality of any blocks, both set restrictions on what can block them. That means NO, any creature CANNOT block a creature with menace except if there's another creature blocking it along with it.

July 6, 2019 2:54 p.m.

Said on Gorm the Great ......

#7

I'm not disputing that you can have Gorm be blocked by one creature. His Gatherer entry says he can.

However, I still think that creatures with menace can't be blocked with only one creature. Therefore, if a pile randomly (sorry I missed the randomly in the last post--I thought I put it in there) assigned to a creature with menace has only one creature in it, it will result in an illegal block and end up with the attacking creature unblocked. No matter if normal declarations are skipped, the game should still follow the rules on blocking in section 509.

Flying and Menace are both keyword abilities that restrict what can block them. If when camouflage is played, the game checks the legality of blockers for flying, it should do the same for menace as well.

July 4, 2019 4:12 p.m.

Said on Gorm the Great ......

#8

@Rhadamanthus But you're not skipping the declare blockers step. Camouflage modifies how blockers are declared. Instead of the defender declaring blockers, they make piles of any number of creatures they control equal to the number of creatures attacking them. Then the attacking player assigns a pile to an attacking creature he controls. Whether or not a block is legal should still follow the rules in 509 (which should include menace).

I also looked into it more and I guess the Oracle Ruling helped.

It's not that you can't block Gorm the Great with less than two creatures, just that if it's possible to block him with two or more creatures, you must do so. If there's only one creature that can block him, that creature does so.

From the Gatherer on Gorm the Great :

6/8/2018: If only one creature can block Gorm the Great, that creature does so.

July 3, 2019 6:12 p.m. Edited.

Said on Gorm the Great ......

#9

If Gorm the Great unluckily/luckily got assigned a pile with less than two creatures, wouldn't he end up unblocked? Since the oracle text for Camouflage reads "...Each creature in a pile that can block the creature that pile is assigned to does so.", wouldn't normal blocking restrictions apply?

July 3, 2019 2:31 p.m.

Said on Helm of the ......

#10

No. Transform only applies to double-faced cards and a card being double-faced is not a copiable value. Making tokens that are copies of a creature only copy the shown "face" of an object, therefore they are not double-faced and cannot be transformed. If an ability instructs you to transform them, nothing happens.

From the Rules:

701.27a To transform a permanent, turn it over so that its other face is up. Only permanents represented by double-faced cards can transform. (See rule 711, “Double-Faced Cards.”)

and

701.27c If a spell or ability instructs a player to transform a permanent that isn’t represented by a double-faced card, nothing happens.

July 3, 2019 2:04 p.m.

Just to add a little to Boza's answer:

The reason tokens don't work is because state-based actions will be checked when the trigger goes on the stack and before it resolves. One of the state-based actions is that tokens will cease to exist if they are located anywhere other than the battlefield. Since that happens, when the trigger starts to resolve, there is no Academy Rector or Arena Rector to exile for the intervening if clause.

From the list of state-based actions:

704.5d If a token is in a zone other than the battlefield, it ceases to exist.

July 2, 2019 2:45 p.m.

Also, the Changeling ability does not cause a creature to enter as all creature types. The changeling ability is a characteristic defining ability that makes the card all creature types at all times.

702.72a Changeling is a characteristic-defining ability. “Changeling” means “This object is every creature type.” This ability works everywhere, even outside the game.

July 1, 2019 3:54 p.m.

That is correct.

Mothdust Changeling has both human and wizard subtypes thanks to the Changeling ability. Champion of the Parish will trigger due to Mothdust Changeling being a human, and Naban, Dean of Iteration will cause Champion of the Parish to trigger twice due to Mothdust Changeling being a wizard. It is the same as if any other human wizard (like Prodigal Sorcerer ) entered the battlefield.

July 1, 2019 3:51 p.m.

Sorry, I just re-read the card carefully. The base P/T of Eldrazi Mimic is the new creature's P/T not base P/T. sigh RTFC me...

Gidgetimer is correct.

June 30, 2019 1:46 a.m. Edited.

@Gidgetimer

Eldrazi Mimic 's triggered ability changes its base power and toughness to the entering creature's base power and toughness. Even though there's never a time that Walker of the Wastes is not a 6/6 in the scenario, it doesn't change that the base power and toughness of Walker of the Wastes is 4/4 and is modified by a continuous effect provided by the static ability.

June 30, 2019 1:36 a.m. Edited.

Eldrazi Mimic will be a 4/4. The base power and toughness of a creature is the values printed on the card without any modifiers.

302.4c To determine a creature’s power and toughness, start with the numbers printed in its lower right corner, then apply any applicable continuous effects. (See rule 613, “Interaction of Continuous Effects.”)

The base power and toughness is what you start with when determining a creature’s power and toughness. In this case Walker of the Wastes has a base power and toughness of 4/4, then it is modified by the number of Wastes you control.

June 30, 2019 12:12 a.m. Edited.

If there were other vampires on board, they would each get 2 +1/+1 counters.

Like I mentioned before, SBA's are performed all at once, so both Cordial Vampire and Gifted Aetherborn will die at the same time. Cordial Vampire will trigger twice putting two instances of its ability on the stack. Objects on the stack exist independently of their sources, so if both instances resolve, your vampires will get 2 +1/+1 counters.

June 29, 2019 8:10 p.m.

No. Neither Cordial Vampire nor Gifted Aetherborn will be saved in this situation.

When resolving spells and abilities, you resolve them fully before anything else can be put to the stack. In this case, Conflagrate will deal its damage to both Cordial Vampire and Gifted Aetherborn at the same time.

For Reference: 608.2j If an instant spell, sorcery spell, or ability that can legally resolve leaves the stack once it starts to resolve, it will continue to resolve fully.

Then, before anything else can happen, State-based actions will be checked and all SBA's happen simultaneously. Due to this, SBA's will move both Cordial Vampire and Gifted Aetherborn to the graveyard as they will both die to lethal damage.

For Reference: 704.3. Whenever a player would get priority (see rule 116, “Timing and Priority”), the game checks for any of the listed conditions for state-based actions, then performs all applicable state-based actions simultaneously as a single event. If any state-based actions are performed as a result of a check, the check is repeated; otherwise all triggered abilities that are waiting to be put on the stack are put on the stack, then the check is repeated. Once no more state-based actions have been performed as the result of a check and no triggered abilities are waiting to be put on the stack, the appropriate player gets priority. This process also occurs during the cleanup step (see rule 514), except that if no state-based actions are performed as the result of the step’s first check and no triggered abilities are waiting to be put on the stack, then no player gets priority and the step ends.

June 29, 2019 7:01 p.m.

Said on Sundial of the ......

#19

No, your mana pool would still empty at the end of your turn. The wording you are concerned with means that all effects that last until "end of turn" end.

From the Gatherer: 9/22/2011: Ending the turn this way means the following things happen in order: 1) All spells and abilities on the stack are exiled. This includes spells and abilities that can't be countered. 2) All attacking and blocking creatures are removed from combat. 3) State-based actions are checked. No player gets priority, and no triggered abilities are put onto the stack. 4) The current phase and/or step ends. The game skips straight to the cleanup step. The cleanup step happens in its entirety.

Basically, what Sundial of the Infinite 's ability does is skip your turn directly to the clean up step.

The end phase of a turn consists of the end step and the cleanup step. During the cleanup step, you discard down to your max hand size, then all damage and "until end of turn" effects wear off.

Comprehensive Rules for the Cleanup Step: 514.1. First, if the active player’s hand contains more cards than their maximum hand size (normally seven), they discard enough cards to reduce their hand size to that number. This turn-based action doesn’t use the stack.

514.2. Second, the following actions happen simultaneously: all damage marked on permanents (including phased-out permanents) is removed and all “until end of turn” and “this turn” effects end. This turn-based action doesn’t use the stack.

What you are probably thinking of is that Sundial of the Infinite can get rid of and prevent triggered abilities that trigger at the beginning of your end step. The "until end of turn" effect of the mana provided by Neheb, Dreadhorde Champion is not a triggered ability.

June 27, 2019 11:59 p.m.

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