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Can You Smell What Yarok Is Cooking?

Commander / EDH BUG (Sultai) Horror Landfall Tokens

MTGBurgeoning


YAROK, THE DESECRATED

Elemental Horror

Deathtouch, lifelink

If a permanent entering the battlefield causes a triggered ability of a permanent we control to trigger, that ability triggers an additional time.

3/5

This Sultai deck takes advantage of numerous enter the battlefield triggers. There is a landfall theme included in this deck, and such, there will be various manners of getting lands onto the battlefield. Let's begin with creatures that have enter the battlefield triggers:

Reclamation Sage: When Reclamation Sage enters the battlefield, we can destroy target artifact or enchantment. We can copy this trigger with Yarok, the Desecrated as well as other cards in the deck. As it is a creature, we can recur it quite easily from our graveyard and we have the ability of fetching Reclamation Sage from our library to the battlefield with Woodland Bellower. The majority of our spot removal is represented by our creatures entering the battlefield. Reclamation Sage is our first example, and definitely not our last.

Spellseeker: When Spellseeker enters the battlefield, we may search our library for an instant or sorcery card with converted mana cost two or less, reveal it and put it into our hand. Admittedly, we do not have a lot of instant and sorcery cards with converted mana cost two or less. However, the spells we do have that fit this category are very powerful: a tutor, targeted permanent removal and mass nonland permanent bouncing. Demonic Tutor puts any card from our library into our hand. Assassin's Trophy destroys any permanent an opponent controls. Cyclonic Rift does, well, overloaded Cyclonic Rifty things. These are the preferred targets for a Spellseeker trigger. Additionally, Essence Flux and Siren's Ruse were added in place of Displace and Ghostly Flicker from the original construction of this deck in order to be fetched-out by Spellseeker if needed. Either of these spells can blink one of our creatures in order to reap the benefits of some enter the battlefield triggers.

Grave Titan: Grave Titan is one of our best creatures to curve into after casting Yarok, the Desecrated. If this scenario transpires, then we net five bodies with total power and toughness of 14 for just . As a bonus, Grave Titan also triggers when it attacks, creating more zombie creature tokens. Grave Titan can amass a high number of zombies in a short amount of time, particularly if Yarok, the Desecrated or any other of our trigger copiers are on the battlefield under our control.

Plaguecrafter: When Plaguecrafter enters the battlefield, each player has to sacrifice a creature or a planeswalker (waving fist in the air and shouting, Sigarda, Host of Herons!!). Each player who can't discards a card. Here's a great piece of removal that can dance around hexproof, shroud, protection and indestructible. We have many small creatures in our deck, including several ways to create creature tokens. It will not be a burden to sacrifice multiple creatures if we have Yarok, the Desecreated, Panharmonicon and/or Strionic Resonator on the battlefield under our control when Plaguecrafter hits the 'field. Removing multiple creatures from our opponents' battlefield for is great value.

Woodland Bellower: With Yarok, the Desecrated or any other way to copy a triggered ability, Woodland Bellower can ramp us ahead of our opponents big-time. Imagine this scenario: We curve into Woodland Bellower and cast it the turn after casting Yarok, the Desecrated. When Woodland Bellower enters the battlefield, its enter the battlefield trigger triggers an additional time because of Yarok, the Desecrated. We search our library for two nonlegendary green creature cards with converted mana cost three or less and put them onto the battlefield. We select two of the following creatures: Farhaven Elf, Elvish Rejuvenator, Springbloom Druid, Risen Reef or Coiling Oracle. Then these two creatures enter the battlefield, and their enter the battlefield triggers trigger an additional time. We can easily net two creatures and four basic lands by casting Woodland Bellower in this fashion. Do we want to cast something the same turn? We can substitute one of the previously mentioned creatures with Lotus Cobra and reap the benefits of four mana of any color(s) we desire. Or maybe we can play some fetch lands from our graveyard. Ramunap Excavator and Dryad of the Ilysian Grove or Wayward Swordtooth can help with that. Do we want our hand replenished? Maybe we fetch-out Eternal Witness and Llanowar Visionary. Woodland Bellower is an engine of value in this deck.

Ulvenwald Hydra: Ulvenwald Hydra is another fantastic creature to curve into after casting Yarok, the Desecrated. If this scenario transpires, Ulvenwald Hydra will fetch-out any two lands in our deck. Any. Two. Lands. Unfortunately, they enter the battlefield tapped, but with the number of landfall-sensitive permanents we have in this deck, that's not an overburdensome hurdle to jump and merely provides additional value.

Elvish Rejuvenator: This elf druid from Core 2019 should get a little more love. When Elvish Rejuvenator enters the battlefield, we look at the top five cards of our library. We may put a land card from among them onto the battlefield tapped. Notice that the text does not say BASIC LAND. It says LAND CARD. As in, ANY LAND. Yes, the possibility exists that this enter the battlefield trigger whiffs, even though the deck is nearly 40% lands, which, percentage-wise, signifies that two out of every five cards are lands. We only need one in five. I like those odds.

Llanowar Visionary: What happens when Llanowar Elves and Elvish Visionary get together? Naturally, they produce Llanowar Visionary. Well, they weren't going to produce Elvish Elves!! Llanowar Visionary is the best from both of these worlds. It draws us a card when it enters the battlefield, like Elvish Visionary, and we can tap it for , like Llanowar Elves.

Solemn Simulacrum: I'm still pushing the nickname Melancholy Automaton, but it's a losing battle. Anyway, one of the most valuable spells in our format, Solemn Simulacrum fetches a basic land when it enters the battlefield and draws us a card when it dies. The ability to blink and recur Solemn Simulacrum makes it even more valuable, especially if Yarok, the Desecrated is on the battlefield under our control.

Avenger of Zendikar: Avenger of Zendikar can be a finisher in this deck, as both its enter the battlefield trigger and landfall abilities can be triggered additional times. Winning the game with an army of plants is not unreasonable considering the various ways to trigger Avenger of Zendikar's multiple triggers.

Acidic Slime: Here is a form of removal on the body of 2/2 ooze with deathtouch. When Acidic Slime enters the battlefield, we destroy target artifact, enchantment, or land. This becomes even more valuable if we are able to copy the trigger with Yarok, the Desecrated, Strionic Resonator or Panharmonicon. Blinking it. Copying it. Creating tokens of it. Acidic Slime is a powerfully versatile piece of recursive removal.

Uro, Titan of Nature's Wrath: Reaping the benefits of multiple Uro, Titan of Nature's Wrath's enter the battlefield triggers can get out of hand for our opponents very quickly. Each time Uro, Titan of Nature's Wrath enters the battlefield, we draw a card, gain three life and may put a land card from our hand onto the battlefield. Imagine if Yarok, the Desecrated, Panharmonicon or Strionic Resonator also is on the battlefield under our control. Just one of them equates to drawing two cards, gaining six life and putting two land cards from our hand onto the battlefield, for just . Even better, if we escape it from our graveyard by paying and exiling five cards from our graveyard, then we can do it all over again. If we time it correctly, we can always use Crystal Shard on Uro, Titan of Nature's Wrath and return it to our hand prior to its forced sacrifice, and STILL reap the benefits of its enter the battlefield trigger!!

End-Raze Forerunners: Here we have Craterhoof Behemoth lite. Actually, is End-Raze Forerunners in the same conversation as Craterhoof Behemoth? If the topic of the conversation is game-enders, then End-Raze Forerunners is worthy of discussion. For the same converted mana cost as Craterhoof Behemoth, he gives other creatures we control +2 +2, vigilance and trample until the end of turn. It's reasonable to assume that we will be able to copy this trigger at least once upon End-Raze Forerunners entering the battlefield. So what we're really looking at is a probable +4 +4, vigilance and trample for our other creatures. End-Raze Forerunners itself has haste, vigilance and trample on a 7/7 body. Yes, End-Raze Forerunners belongs in the conversation of game-ending creatures, but we'll always think of Craterhoof Behemoth first.

Risen Reef: Whenever Risen Reef or another elemental enters the battlefield under our control, we can look at the top card of our library and if it's a land card, we may put it onto the battlefield tapped. If we don't put the card onto the battlefield, we can put it into our hand. Basically, when Risen Reef enters the battlefield, the top card of our library either goes to the battlefield if it's a land or into our hand if it isn't. This is a great way to draw some cards or ramp-up our lands.

Sidisi, Undead Vizier: NOTICE: Sidisi, Undead Vizier can exploit herself when she enters the battlefield. When Sidisi, Undead Vizier exploits a creature, we can search our library for a card and put it into our hand. With a casting cost of , it is not optimal to sacrifice Sidisi, Undead Vizier to her own exploit trigger. There are a lot of dorks and token creatures that should be inundating our battlefield, and one of those creatures is much easier to sacrifice. A 4/6 body with deathtouch is strong. Having the ability to Demonic Tutor by sacrificing a creature when Sidisi, Undead Vizier enters the battlefield is strong. With Yarok, the Desecrated on the battlefield, exchanging a couple of scrub creatures for a couple of tutored cards from our library is really, really strong.

Eternal Witness: Eternal Witness is our ultimate graveyard recursion target, particularly if we can copy her triggered ability. If we can, then when Eternal Witness enters the battlefield we can return as many target cards from our graveyard as the number of times Eternal Witness triggered. Strong with the force, she is.

Necromancy: The long-winded text on this card can be dizzying. If we choose to cast Necromancy with flash, then we sacrifice it at the beginning of the end step. Or, we simply cast it during our main phase. When Necromancy enters the battlefield, if it's on the battlefield, it becomes an aura with "enchant creature put onto the battlefield with Necromancy." Then we can put a target creature card from a graveyard onto the battlefield under our control and attach Necromancy to it. When Necromancy leaves the battlefield, that creature's controller sacrifices it. WOTC!!! Let's try to dial this down a bit. If we cast Necromancy as though it had flash, we have it and the creature it targeted until the beginning of the next end step. If we cast Necromancy during our main phase, then we have it and the creature it targeted until either the creature or Necromancy leaves the battlefield. We can copy this triggered ability and recur multiple creatures. CAUTION: When Necromancy leaves the battlefield we lose all creatures recurred by it. The headache is worth playing it, trust me. The headache you have now after reading this card's description, maybe not.

Farhaven Elf: Farhaven Elf is a descendant of the classic Wood Elves. Instead of searching for a forest card as per Wood Elves's enter the battlefield trigger, we can search for any basic land with Farhaven Elf. Farhaven Elf has more than twice the number of targets Wood Elves would have in this deck. Due to this, Farhaven Elf is preferred over Wood Elves, particularly because we plan to recur, blink and copy the enter the battlefield trigger of this land-fetcher as much as possible.

Greenwarden of Murasa: This elemental from Battle For Zendikar is a hefty version of Eternal Witness. For we get a 5/4 body that allows us to return a card from our graveyard to our hand after it enters the battlefield. When Greenwarden of Murasa dies, if we exile it, we can return a card from our graveyard to our hand. Greenwarden of Murasa's second ability is situational, of course. There may be a need to return a card from our graveyard to our hand when it dies, so exiling it is preferable. However, stashing it in the graveyard for later recursion will allow us to recur another card upon Greenwarden of Murasa's return to the battlefield. Got that?

Phantasmal Image: Do you know what's better than the combination of all of our enter the battlefield triggers from all of our creatures? All of the enter the battlefield triggers from all of our creatures...plus one! When Phantasmal Image enters the battlefield, we may have it enter the battlefield as a copy of any creature on the battlefield. Unfortunately, it is also an illusion in addition to its other creature types and has "when this creature becomes the target of a spell or ability, sacrifice it." Phantasmal Image is fragile after it enters the battlefield, but that's okay with us. By the time we need to worry about the illusion part of this creature, we already would have reaped the benefit of its enter the battlefield trigger.

Venser, Shaper Savant: We can be tricky with Venser, Shaper Savant. Having flash and returning a target spell or target permanent upon entering the battlefield is what makes this human wizard so versatile. We must make an important distinction about Venser, Shaper Savant. If we return a spell to its owner’s hand, it’s removed from the stack and will not resolve. The spell isn’t countered; it just no longer exists. This works against a spell that can’t be countered. Granted, the spell is returned to its owner's hand, which means that the opponent can cast it again. Buying time can be valuable. Additionally, we can return target permanent to its owner's hand when Venser, Shaper Savant enters the battlefield. This is improved if we have Yarok, the Desecrated or an equivalent on the battlefield under our control.

Springbloom Druid: For the purposes of this deck, and its landfall-laden theme, Springbloom Druid may be the most valuable land-fetcher we have. When Springbloom Druid enters the battlefield, we may sacrifice a land. If we do, we search our library for up to two basic land cards and put them onto the battlefield tapped. This is a creature version of Harrow. Not only do we reap the benefits of two lands entering our battlefield, but we get a land into the graveyard. We have multiple ways of playing lands from our graveyard, so this is win-win!

Coiling Oracle: Coiling Oracle was coiling around oracles well before Risen Reef was raising reefs. Or something. Sure. Anyway, when Coiling Oracle enters the battlefield we look at the top card of library. If it's a land card, we put it onto the battlefield. If it's not a land, we put the card into our hand. So, basically, play a land or draw a card. Coiling Oracle is a great target for multiple triggers as we can ramp-up our lands and/or fill our hand with cards.

Hornet Queen: Under the right circumstances, Hornet Queen can bring with her a swarm of deathtouching and flying insect creature tokens that act as combat deterrents for our opponents, or an aerial assault squad. The 1/1 flying deathtouchers are very valuable as few opponents want to lose precious creatures to some stinkin' 1/1 bugs. As we are light in the air, Hornet Queen offers protection from any winged adversaries hiding in the clouds. With the ability to copy triggered abilities and the presence of blink and recursion in this deck, creating a vast army of insects is not unreasonable.

Rune-Scarred Demon: Do you know what's better than a 6/6 flying demon that when it enters the battlefield we can Demonic Tutor? How about a 6/6 flying demon that when it enters the battlefield we can Demonic Tutor multiple times? Yarok, the Desecrated, Panharmonicon and Strionic Resonator approve.

Ravenous Chupacabra: When Ravenous Chupacabra enters the battlefield we can destroy target creature an opponent controls. Notice the text. It says DESTROY TARGET CREATURE. It doesn't say destroy target NONBLACK creature. It doesn't say destroy target NONTOKEN creature. It doesn't say destroy target NONLEGENDARY creature. Destroy. Target. Creature. The 2/2 body is weak at , but its trigger is strong. It's a trigger that we can, and will, copy. Destroy. Any. Creature. That is all.

Mulldrifter: Casting Mulldrifter for will be as rare as winter roses for this deck, particularly with the amount of recursion we have throughout this list. When Mulldrifter enters the battlefield, we draw two cards. We will pay Mulldrifter's evoke cost of and if we have Yarok, the Desecrated or Panharmonicon on the battlefield under our control, we're essentially drawing four cards for . Four cards. Three mana. I'm in!

Craterhoof Behemoth: The show-stopper. The curtain-caller. The walk-off. Craterhoof Behemoth is a finisher. This is the Mariano Rivera of our deck. We set-up the game and 'field, Craterhoof Behemoth finishes it. When Craterhoof Behemoth enters the battlefield, creatures we control gain trample and get +X/+X until end of turn, where X is the number of creatures we control. With a plethora of ways to create creature tokens, Craterhoof Behemoth will almost always have an army awaiting is arrival. Our ultimate finisher can be an army himself if targeted with a kicked Rite of Replication. That's six 35/35 hasty tramplers!

Tatyova, Benthic Druid: Is Tatyova, Benthic Druid the best uncommon legendary creature in the history of Magic: the Gathering? Whenever a land enters the battlefield under our control (why couldn't the text just say landfall?), we gain one life and we draw a card. If Yarok, the Desecrated is on the battlefield under our control, we draw two cards and gain two life. If we play a fetch land? We draw four cards and gain four life after activating and sacrificing the fetch land for another land. Can we play more than one land this turn? You see where we're going with this. Tatyova, Benthic Druid is a powerful value engine and has my vote as best uncommon legendary creature in Magic: the Gathering's history. Sorry Syr Konrad, the Grim.

Retreat to Hagra: Here is another landfall mechanic that will drain our opponents' life while boosting our own. Whenever a land enters the battlefield under our control, we can choose to have each opponent lose one life and we can gain one life. As mentioned throughout this deck list, there are so many ways to get multiple lands onto the battlefield under our control through fetches, creatures and from our graveyard. Additionally, if Yarok, the Desecrated is under our control, it's reasonable to conclude that we can set a clock on our opponents' life totals. With Yarok, the Desecrated and Retreat to Hagra under our control and ability to play two fetch lands from our graveyard each turn results in our opponents losing eight life each turn. Retreat to Hagra is an underrated landfall card and can be considered one of our win conditions.

The Great Henge: Drawing cards and making creatures bigger. These are two of the best things Magic: the Gathering has to offer. With The Great Henge, we get both of these features in one mythic rare artifact from Throne of Eldraine. For starters, we're NEVER casting this for . The ability to reduce this spell's mana cost is one of The Great Henge's benefits. Once it's on the battlefield and under our control, we can tap it for and gain two life. Whenever a nontoken creature enters the battlefield under our control, we put a +1 +1 counter on it and draw a card. However, if we have Yarok, the Desecrated or Panharmonicon under our control, then we're putting two +1 +1 counters on that creature and drawing two cards. We can even tap The Great Henge in order to activate Strionic Resonator when a creature enters the battlefield under our control to copy the triggers. Drawing cards and making creatures bigger. Living the dream!

Lotus Cobra: If left unchecked, Lotus Cobra can accelerate our game plan big-time. Whenever a land enters the battlefield under our control, we add one mana of any color to our mana pool. We can generate a lot of "free mana" because we have so many ways of getting lands onto the battlefield. Additionally, if we can trigger Lotus Cobra's ability multiple times, imagine the value. Consider this scenario: Under our control we have Lotus Cobra, Ramunap Excavator, Yarok, the Desecrated, Wayward Swordtooth and a fetch land in our graveyard. We play our land for turn by playing a fetch land from our graveyard through Ramunap Excavator's ability. It enters the battlefield and gives us two mana of any color, one through Lotus Cobra and another through Yarok, the Desecrated. We crack the fetch land and search for another land to put onto the battlefield. When this land enters play, it gives us two mana of any color again, one through Lotus Cobra and another through Yarok, the Desecrated. Then, because of Wayward Swordtooth's ability, we can repeat this process all over again. We end up netting eight mana of any color JUST FOR PLAYING AND CRACKING A FETCH LAND TWICE. This scenario becomes more enticing if we include any of our other landfall triggers such as Field of the Dead (eight 2/2 zombie creature tokens as long as we control seven lands with different names), Retreat to Hagra (an eight point life swing), Tatyova, Benthic Druid (gain eight life and draw eight cards) or Tireless Tracker (create eight clue tokens). Lotus Cobra is awesome in this deck.

Tireless Tracker: Whenever a land enters the battlefield under our control (LANDFALL!), we can investigate. We investigate by creating a clue artifact token which allows us to tap and sacrifice it in order to draw a card. Each time we sacrifice a clue, we can put a +1 +1 counter on Tireless Tracker. As we investigate, Tireless Tracker becomes bigger. We can also double the number of clues we create if Yarok, the Desecrated is on the battlefield under our control.

Roil Elemental: Roil Elemental is a very fragile 3/2 flier that costs . Not good. It's landfall ability says whenever a land enters the battlefield under our control, we may gain control of target creature for as long as we control Roil Elemental. Really good. Hopefully, up to this point, this deck list has demonstrated its propensity for getting lands into play. In doing so, we want to reap as many landfall abilities as possible, and Roil Elemental provides us with the ability to gain control of creatures. As previously mentioned, Roil Elemental sports a weak 3/2 body and is susceptible to a lot of forms of removal. Proceed with caution. Roil Elemental is included because it provides an additional element to this deck: Stealing creatures.

Guardian Project: Guardian Project and Yarok, the Desecrated are like peanut butter and jelly. Curve into Yarok, the Desecreated after casting Guardian Project in order to begin reaping the benefits of double-triggered card draw right away. Then, each time a nontoken creature enters the battlefield under our control we draw two cards. It is tempting to include Aluren in this deck and focus a little bit more on creatures with three converted mana cost or less. Under this scenario, each time we cast a creature with converted mana cost three or less through Aluren, when it enters the battlefield we draw two cards. Alas, however, Aluren is a pricey reserved list card and its presence is needed in a different EDH/Commander deck. We can dream about it though!

Rampaging Baloths: Let's create some creature tokens! Whenever a land enters the battlefield under our control, we create a 4/4 green beast creature token. With our ability to get multiple lands into play each turn, creating a stable 4/4 beast creature tokens is not difficult.

Panharmonicon: Panharmonicon is a more selective version of Yarok, the Desecrated. It does not recognize landfall (d'oh!), so any of our spells or permanents that will trigger landfall will not trigger it an additional time with Panharmonicon. This is a bummer for sure. However, we have a lot of creatures that enter the battlefield with their own triggers in addition to there own abilities to trigger other permanents. Even with Panharmonicon's limitations, at a converted mana cost of it is still a valuable artifact for this deck as we have a high number of creatures with enter the battlefield triggers.

Essence Flux: This is simply a blink spell for the purposes of enabling an enter the battlefield trigger from one of our creatures. For we can exile a creature we control and then return to the battlefield under its owner's control. If needed, this can be a target for Spellseeker. We can use this for removal, card draw, bouncing permanents or returning spells to their owners' hand, life gain, land ramp, graveyard-to-hand recursion, tutoring, etc. etc. etc.

Equilibrium: Equilibrium is a wonderfully versatile card. Whenever we cast a creature spell, we may pay . When we do we can return target creature to its owner's hand. Notice the text. RETURN TARGET CREATURE. It doesn't say return target creature YOU CONTROL. It doesn't say return target NONTOKEN creature. It doesn't say return target creature AN OPPONENT CONTROLS. RETURN ANY CREATURE. Whenever we cast a creature spell. For an additional . The creature spell can be countered and we can STILL return a creature to its owner's hand. Does an opponent have a troublesome creature? Bounce it to their hand. Does an opponent have a threatening token creature under their control? Bounce it to their hand and watch it get exiled. Do we want to cast one of our creatures again in order to take advantage of its enter the battlefield trigger? Bounce it to our hand. Equilibrium is criminally underplayed.

Temur Sabertooth: Temur Sabertooth has a 4/3 body for . Meh. However, if we tap we can return another creature we control to its owner's hand and Temur Sabertooth will gain indestructible until end of turn. Although the cost is more than Crystal Shard's , we don't have to tap Temur Sabertooth in order to activate its ability. Additionally, the presence of Temur Sabertooth on the battlefield opens the door to combat chicanery. Declare Temur Sabertooth and another creature as blockers. Then, before the combat damage step, tap in order to return the other creature blocking to our hand. This gives Temur Sabertooth indestructible and prevents damage to our other blocker, safely transporting it back to our hand for another round of enter the battlefield triggers. With indestructible until the end of turn, Temur Sabertooth also survives.

Strionic Resonator: Strionic Resonator is our one-shot-a-turn version of Yarok, the Desecrated. For , we can tap Strionic Resonator and copy any triggered ability we control. So each round of turns, we've got one shot to copy the best triggered ability we control. Land ramp? Card draw? Creature tokens? Tutoring? We better make it count! Even though we can only activate it once each turn, Strionic Resonator is too valuable to omit from this deck.

Crystal Shard: The versatility of Crystal Shard is so attractive, particularly for this type of deck. For starters, we're NEVER tapping and tapping it. We will always and only use to activate Crystal Shard. So, did one of our opponents completely tap out? Well, let's return a creature to their hand. Are we mismatched in combat? After blockers are declared but before the combat damage step let's return our blocker to our hand, keeping our opponent's creature from assigning combat damage and preserving our creature for a brighter future of re-entering our battlefield and re-triggering things. Crystal Shard is great because it can be a nuisance to our opponents and their creatures as well as a boon for the preservation and further use of our own creatures.

Thassa, Deep-Dwelling: Set it and forget it. Honestly, that's true. I can't remember how many times I've forgotten about Thassa, Deep-Dwelling's ability to tap a creature for when it would have been beneficial to do so. Well, hopefully, we'll never forget about her primary ability, and that is at the beginning of our end step we can exile another creature we control and then return it to the battlefield under our control. Thassa, Deep-Dweller allows us to benefit from another enter the battlefield trigger from one of our creatures. Just don't forget it!

Siren's Ruse: Siren's Ruse is another spell we can use to exile a creature we control in order for it to return to the battlefield, hopefully to reap the rewards of some entering the battlefield triggers, to ward off combat damage after the blocking step of combat, or both!

Ramunap Excavator: Ramunap Excavator is our living and breathing version of Crucible of Worlds. We have a number of fetch lands in the deck, and thus, they will be hitting the 'yard in order to find us other lands. Ramunap Excavator allows us to replay those fetch lands from our graveyard, gaining more and more value through land accumulation and mana-fixing. As a bonus, Ramunap Excavator can be fetched-out of our library by Woodland Bellower and right onto the battlefield under our control.

Crucible of Worlds: It is a common philosophy to think of our graveyard as an extension of our hand, and if we have lands in our graveyard then we have lands in "our hand," and we should play them accordingly. Unfortunately, we need something to allow us to do this, and Crucible of Worlds is one of those options. Crucible of Worlds let's us play lands from our graveyard. We have a number of cards that allows us to plan additional lands each turn. Imagine this scenario: Fabled Passage is in our graveyard and we have Azusa, Lost but Seeking on the battlefield under our control. From our graveyard, we can play Fabled Passage, sacrifice it for a basic land, and then repeat that process two additional times. Imagine the benefits we reap if we have any landfall triggers. What if we have landfall triggers in addition to Yarok, the Desecrated!? Crucible of Worlds is an auto-include.

Rhystic Study: Are you going to pay for that? Are you going to pay for that? Are you going to pay for that? Are you going to pay for that? Are you going to pay for that? Are you going to pay for that? Are you going to pay for that? Are you going to pay for that? Seriously, can't Wizards develop a keyword or mechanic that can replace this awful question? Something like, "mana tax " or something?

Arcane Signet: For we can cast Arcane Signet and tap it for one mana of any color from our General/Commander's color identity. For the purposes of our deck, that's , or . No other artifact in the history of Magic: the Gathering can do what Arcane Signet does in our format without restriction, limitation or drawback.

Exploration: Exploration permits us to play an additional land each turn. For an investment of , we can play an additional land every turn. It's not a creature. It's an enchantment. As creatures are much easier to remove from the battlefield, such as Wayward Swordtooth, Dryad of the Ilysian Grove and Azusa, Lost but Seeking, Exploration has greater staying power as an enchantment. Very powerful. Very valuable. I can just hear Yarok, the Desecrated adding up the landfall triggers!

Wayward Swordtooth: Wayward Swordtooth allows us to play an additional land on each of our turns. This is significant because we have several landfall-sensitive triggers in our deck and Yarok, the Desecrated triggers these abilities an additional time. If we have The City's Blessing by controlling at least ten permanents, an easily achievable feat, then Wayward Swordtooth can attack and block. With a 5/5 body and the ability to play an additional land each turn, Wayward Swordtooth's presence in the deck is justified.

Dryad of the Ilysian Grove: What happens when we pair Exploration with Prismatic Omen? The answer is Dryad of the Ilysian Grove. With a 2/4 body for , this nymph from Theros Beyond Death can block mana dorks easily. However, let's not mistake the presence of Dryad of the Ilysian Grove as a combat veteran in this deck. Being able to play an additional land each turn is very valuable in this deck. There are many landfall-sensitive triggers of which we want to take advantage. Additionally, when Dryad of Ilysian Grove is on the battlefield under our control, lands we control are every basic land type in addition to their other types. There is an equitable distribution of mana in this deck in addition to multiple fetch lands that can color-fix when needed. Still, this is Magic: the Gathering and sometimes we can get color-screwed. Dryad of Ilysian Groves helps with this potential problem. Lastly, we are running the Throne of Eldraine check lands (Mystic Sanctuary, Witch's Cottage, Gingerbread Cabin) and would like to reap the benefits of their enter the battlefield triggers. Dryad of the Ilysian Grove helps to ensure that we have the land types necessary to do so.

Azusa, Lost but Seeking: What's better than playing an extra land each turn? How about playing TWO extra lands each turn! Azusa, Lost but Seeking increases the number of available land drops from one to three each turn. With multiple ways to play land cards from our graveyard, we can ensure that Azusa, Lost but Seeking's ability will not be wasted. Be prepared and act quickly because Azusa, Lost but Seeking is an attention-magnet!

Sol Ring: This is the best artifact in our format. Sol Ring costs to cast and gives us when we tap it. No other artifact in Magic: the Gathering's history can do what Sol Ring does in our format without limitation, restriction or drawback. Best artifact in EDH/Commander.

Beast Within: A lot of our targeted removal comes from our creatures' enter the battlefield triggers. Beast Within is included in this deck because we can destroy any permanent at instant speed for . The controller of this destroyed permanent receives a 3/3 green beast creature token for their troubles. This is almost always a favorable swap.

Living Death: This is a great mass removal spell for us if the battlefield becomes too intense. This is also a great recursion spell for us if our graveyard is filled with a bunch of enter-the-battlefield-triggers just waiting to happen. DISCLOSURE: The end results of casting Living Death in this deck can be messy when ordering and stacking triggers. Prepare for a game-within-the-game scenario. Seeing our trigger-happy creatures return to our battlefield is so good. Watching an opponent cast Gather Specimens is not. It hurts. It hurts a lot.

Assassin's Trophy: As mentioned, we have multiple forms of targeted removal from our creatures. Assassin's Trophy's presence in this deck is justified because of its ability to destroy any permanent an opponent controls in exchange for a basic land. Although providing an opponent with a free land is not optimal, destroying any permanent at instant speed for is.

Cyclonic Rift: This is our obligatory inclusion of a hated opponent-disruption spell. Cyclonic Rift is powerful. It is potentially game-ending. It's legal. We have blue in our deck. We're playing it. DISCLOSURE: When Spellseeker enters the battlefield, Cyclonic Rift or Demonic Tutor are generally targets #1a and #1b. Hopefully Yarok, the Desecrated is on the battlefield under our control so we don't have to choose.

Demonic Tutor: For we can put any card from our library into our hand. Demonic Tutor is generally target #1a or #1b of a Spellseeker trigger. We also have ways to get this sorcery back from our graveyard. Best tutor in the game.

Rite of Replication: Getting ahead of our opponents in order to cast a kicked Rite of Replication much earlier than turn eight or nine is a very achievable goal in this deck. Creating five token copies of a creature is powerful. This becomes even more salient when the creature has valuable enter the battlefield triggers. A kicked Rite of Replication can become back-breaking for our opponents if Yarok, the Desecrated is under the battlefield under our control. Imagine creating five token copies of Acidic Slime, Grave Titan, Risen Reef, Ulvenwald Hydra or Rune-Scarred Demon. Now imagine each of the enter the battlefield triggers of these creature tokens doubling. Destroy any combination of ten artifacts, enchantments and/or lands. Create 20 2/2 zombie creature tokens. Enjoy 60 Risen Reef triggers. Search for ten lands and put them onto the battlefield tapped. Demonic Tutor ten times. This is just a freshly landed snowflake on the iceberg of Rite of Replication in this deck.

Tooth and Nail: Similar to a kicked Rite of Replication, getting to nine mana in our deck quickly is not inordinately difficult. Casting an entwined Tooth and Nail should end the game or create a formidable defense from our opponents' armies. If we're in need of defense against a large army, putting Avenger of Zendikar and Woodland Bellower into play will accomplish this feat. When ordering the enter the battlefield triggers onto the stack, be sure to place Avenger of Zendikar's on the stack last so it resolves prior to Woodland Bellower's. If we have Yarok, the Desecrated on the battlefield under our control, then Avenger of Zendikar will create X 0/1 plant tokens where X is equal to twice the number of lands we control (because of Yarok, the Desecrated). Then Woodland Bellower will fetch-out two land-fetching creatures (because of Yarok, the Desecrated) like Springbloom Druid and Farhaven Elf. When these creatures enter the battlefield, Springbloom Druid will fetch-out four basic lands from our library (if we sacrifice two lands) and Farhaven Elf will fetch-out two basic lands from our library. Then each of these lands enter the battlefield and trigger Avenger of Zendikar's landfall ability twice (because of Yarok, the Desecrated). When the dust settles, we created X 12/13 plant creature tokens where X is equal to twice the number of lands we control, in addition to Avenger of Zendikar, Woodland Bellower, Springbloom Druid and Farhaven Elf. NOW who's on the defensive!? We can go offensive as well by putting into play End-Raze Forerunners and Craterhoof Behemoth. Either way, an entwined Tooth and Nail should bring eventual victory one way or another.

Muldrotha, the Gravetide: Graveyards have evolved into a second hand. Muldrotha, the Gravetide allows us to play a land and cast a permanent spell of each permanent type from our graveyard during each of our turns. Unfortunately, we can't cast instants or sorceries. Muldrotha, the Gravetide is still valuable because of the open accessibility of our graveyard . Play land from our graveyard, cast a creature, artifact and/or enchantment spell from our graveyard and preserve the cards in our hand. This represents great value.

Vedalken Orrery: Along with haste and split second, flash seems underappreciated in our format. Granting flash to all of our spells is so advantageous. The strategic inclusion of this mechanic allows to play reactively, holding up our mana each turn and await the actions of our opponents. If we make it around the table, then we splash a bunch of spells on our last opponent's end step, untap, draw, and do it all over again. CAUTION: Remember earlier when I included split second as an underappreciated mechanic? Well, appreciating its power is never more evident than when an opponent casts Krosan Grip or Wipe Away targeting our Vedalken Orrery. It hurts. It hurts a lot.

Swamp: There are five Swamps in the deck.

Forest: There are five Forests in the deck.

Island: There are five Islands in the deck.

Command Tower: Command Tower is the best land in our format. Without restriction, limitation or drawback, Command Tower can tap for one mana of any color of our commander's color identity. No land in the history of Magic: the Gathering can do what Command Tower does.

Field of the Dead: After Yarok, the Desecrated, Field of the Dead may be the most valuable card in the deck. Whenever Field of the Dead or another land enters the battlefield under our control, if we control seven or more lands with different names then we create a 2/2 black zombie creature token. There are over two dozen lands with different names in this deck, and once we get to seven lands (a feat easily accomplished) we begin creating 2/2 zombie creature tokens whenever a land enters the battlefield under our control. What if we have Yarok, the Desecrated under our control? Two 2/2 zombies. Imagine playing a fetch land and netting four 2/2 zombie creature tokens JUST FOR PLAYING AND FETCHING A LAND. What if we can play additional lands each turn? Additional zombies. Field of the Dead acts a win condition for this deck.

There are five fetch lands in the deck: Verdant Catacombs, Misty Rainforest, Polluted Delta, Prismatic Vista and Fabled Passage. Yes! Fabled Passage and Prismatic Vista are SO counted as fetch lands. How dare you!? Anyway, these lands are the driving force of our landfall abilities, and when we can play them from our graveyard, at times more than once per turn, we get even more value from our landfall triggers. Field of the Dead approves.

There are three check lands in the deck: Drowned Catacomb, Hinterland Harbor and Woodland Cemetery:

There are three shock lands in the deck: Watery Grave, Breeding Pool and Overgrown Tomb

There are two horizon lands in the deck: Waterlogged Grove and Nurturing Peatland. These lands are terrific inclusions in our deck. With so many ways to play land cards from our graveyard, we can tap and sacrifice a horizon land in order to draw a card. Then, we can just play it from our graveyard.

Morphic Pool is included in the deck as a place-setter for the eventual Dimir horizon land. This is not a bad consolation prize.

There are three Throne of Eldraine check lands in the deck: Mystic Sanctuary, Witch's Cottage and Gingerbread Cabin. These lands are included because they have enter the battlefield triggers as long as they enter the battlefield untapped. When Mystic Sanctuary enters the battlefield untapped, we can put target instant or sorcery card from our graveyard on top of our library. When Witch's Cottage enters the battlefield untapped, we can put target creature card from our graveyard on top of our library. When Gingerbread Cabin enters the battlefield untapped, we create a food token. Mystic Sanctuary and Witch's Cottage can bring return instants, sorceries and creatures from our graveyard to the top of our library. Gingerbread Cabin gains us life. We receive these benefits just for playing the lands, as long as we meet the untapped requirements. Also, we can fetch these with Polluted Delta, Misty Rainforest and Verdant Catacombs. If we have Tatyova, Benthic Druid on the battlefield and under our control, then we can draw the card that we place on top of our library. If we have Yarok, the Desecrated on the battlefield and under our control, then each of these abilities triggers again. Value!

Alchemist's Refuge: This is another flash enabler. Flash is just so good!

Temple of the False God: Everyone knows the story with Temple of the False God. For the purposes of this deck, we will be playing a lot of lands and have a lot of ways to get lands onto the battlefield quickly. Playing a useless Temple of the False God is barely a blip on this deck's radar.

Reliquary Tower: We have the propensity of drawing a lot of cards in this deck. In so doing, there will be times that we have TOO MANY cards in hand. Well, not too many for me, but too many for those who enforce the seven-card maximum hand size rule. I don't know about you, but I love my cards. I don't want to discard them unless it's the deck's strategy. #NotThisDeck'sStrategy. Including Reliquary Tower allows us to keep those cards in our hand, and not discarded like unworthy rectangles of cardboard!

And that's the way the news goes. Below is an MTG Burgeoning YouTube video discussing this deck in greater detail.

Can you smell what Yarok is cooking?!?

This is MTG Burgeoning's EDH/Commander Deck Tech for Yarok, the Desecrated:

This is MTG Burgeoning play-testing this Yarok, the Desecrated EDH/Commander deck:

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81% Casual

Competitive

Top Ranked
Date added 1 year
Last updated 6 months
Legality

This deck is Commander / EDH legal.

Rarity (main - side)

13 - 0 Mythic Rares

43 - 0 Rares

14 - 0 Uncommons

10 - 0 Commons

Cards 100
Avg. CMC 3.94
Tokens C Token Artifact Food, Clue, 4/4 Beast, Insect 1/1 G w/ Flying, Deathtouch, 3/3 G Token Creature Beast, C Emblem City's Blessing, 0/1 Plant, Zombie 2/2 B, Copy Clone
Folders MTG Burgeoning's EDH/Commander Decks, Good and interesting things, Imported decks
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